libreboot

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commit 131c5f4ca35db3ca96f1b2fc503af7e57cbe7263
parent aec9b977b3ea17cdcc0638e418e58b5033abff9b
Author: Francis Rowe <info@gluglug.org.uk>
Date:   Sun, 21 Feb 2016 06:42:56 +0000

grub docs: recommend coreboot_grub.cfg instead

Diffstat:
docs/src/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.texi | 8++++----
docs/src/gnulinux/grub_config.texi | 2+-
2 files changed, 5 insertions(+), 5 deletions(-)

diff --git a/docs/src/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.texi b/docs/src/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.texi @@ -82,13 +82,13 @@ There are several advantages to modifying the GRUB configuration stored in CBFS, @node 1st option don't re-flash @section 1st option: don't re-flash @anchor{#st-option-dont-re-flash} -By default, GRUB in libreboot is configured to scan all partitions on the main storage for /boot/grub/libreboot_grub.cfg or /grub/libreboot_grub.cfg(for systems where /boot is on a dedicated partition), and then use it automatically. +By default, GRUB in libreboot is configured to scan all partitions on the main storage for /boot/grub/coreboot_grub.cfg or /grub/coreboot_grub.cfg(for systems where /boot is on a dedicated partition), and then use it automatically. -Simply create your custom GRUB configuration and save it to @strong{/boot/grub/libreboot_grub.cfg} on the running system. The next time you boot, GRUB (in libreboot) will automatically switch to this configuration file. @strong{This means that you do not have to re-flash, recompile or otherwise modify libreboot at all!} +Simply create your custom GRUB configuration and save it to @strong{/boot/grub/coreboot_grub.cfg} on the running system. The next time you boot, GRUB (in libreboot) will automatically switch to this configuration file. @strong{This means that you do not have to re-flash, recompile or otherwise modify libreboot at all!} -Ideally, your distribution should automatically generate a libreboot_grub.cfg file that is written specifically under the assumption that it will be read and used on a libreboot system that uses GRUB as a payload. If your distribution does not do this, then you can try to add that feature yourself or politely ask someone involved with or otherwise knowledgeable about the distribution to do it for you. The libreboot_grub.cfg could either contain the full configuration, or it could chainload another GRUB ELF executable (built to be used as a coreboot payload) that is located in a partition on the main storage. +Ideally, your distribution should automatically generate a coreboot_grub.cfg file that is written specifically under the assumption that it will be read and used on a libreboot system that uses GRUB as a payload. If your distribution does not do this, then you can try to add that feature yourself or politely ask someone involved with or otherwise knowledgeable about the distribution to do it for you. The coreboot_grub.cfg could either contain the full configuration, or it could chainload another GRUB ELF executable (built to be used as a coreboot payload) that is located in a partition on the main storage. -If you want to adapt a copy of the existing @emph{libreboot} GRUB configuration and use that for the libreboot_grub.cfg file, then follow @ref{#tools,#tools}, @ref{#rom,#rom} and @ref{#extract_testconfig,#extract_testconfig} to get the @strong{@emph{grubtest.cfg}}. Rename @strong{@emph{grubtest.cfg}} to @strong{@emph{libreboot_grub.cfg}} and save it to @strong{@emph{/boot/grub/}} on the running system where it is intended to be used. Modify the file at that location however you see fit, and then stop reading this guide (the rest of this page is irrelevant to you); @strong{in libreboot_grub.cfg on disk, if you are adapting it based on grub.cfg from CBFS then remove the check for libreboot_grub.cfg otherwise it will loop.}. +If you want to adapt a copy of the existing @emph{libreboot} GRUB configuration and use that for the coreboot_grub.cfg file, then follow @ref{#tools,#tools}, @ref{#rom,#rom} and @ref{#extract_testconfig,#extract_testconfig} to get the @strong{@emph{grubtest.cfg}}. Rename @strong{@emph{grubtest.cfg}} to @strong{@emph{coreboot_grub.cfg}} and save it to @strong{@emph{/boot/grub/}} on the running system where it is intended to be used. Modify the file at that location however you see fit, and then stop reading this guide (the rest of this page is irrelevant to you); @strong{in coreboot_grub.cfg on disk, if you are adapting it based on grub.cfg from CBFS then remove the check for coreboot_grub.cfg otherwise it will loop.}. This is all well and good, but what should you actually put in your GRUB configuration file? Read @uref{grub_config.html,grub_config.html} for more information. diff --git a/docs/src/gnulinux/grub_config.texi b/docs/src/gnulinux/grub_config.texi @@ -54,7 +54,7 @@ These are some common examples of ways in which the grubtest.cfg file can be mod @anchor{#obvious-option-dont-even-modify-the-built-in-grub.cfg} Use the menuentry that says something like @emph{Search for GRUB outside CBFS}. Assuming that you have a grub.cfg file at /boot/grub/ in your installed distro, this will generate a new menuentry in the GRUB menu. Use that to boot. -Then do this as root:@* $ @strong{cd /boot/grub/}@* $ @strong{ln -s grub.cfg libreboot_grub.cfg} +Then do this as root:@* $ @strong{cd /boot/grub/}@* $ @strong{ln -s grub.cfg coreboot_grub.cfg} After that, your system should then boot automatically.