libreboot

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commit 18d527d4fc5d6287ed316f3447f2dabceaca67ff
parent 55ed48f4cba726b7e83c1f0bb5873e8678eee76f
Author: Swift Geek <swiftgeek@gmail.com>
Date:   Thu,  5 Oct 2017 23:15:15 +0000

Merge branch 'master' of csh/libreboot into master

Diffstat:
docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md | 41+++++++++++++++++++++--------------------
docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md | 30+++++++++++++++++-------------
docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md | 6+++---
docs/install/bbb_setup.md | 2+-
docs/install/x200_external.md | 2+-
docs/misc/bbb_ehci.md | 4++--
www/download.md | 4++--
www/faq.md | 4++--
www/index.md | 2+-
www/news/new-mailing-lists.md | 4++--
10 files changed, 52 insertions(+), 47 deletions(-)

diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md b/docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md @@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ Paradoxically, as you get more advanced, Parabola can actually become compared to what most distributions provide. You will find over time that other distributions tend to *get in your way*. -A lot of the steps in this guide will refer to the Arch wiki. Arch is +A lot of the steps in this guide will refer to ArchWiki. Arch is the upstream distribution that Parabola uses. Most of this guide will also tell you to read wiki articles, other pages, manuals, and so on. In general, it tries to cherry-pick the most useful information, but @@ -33,10 +33,10 @@ nonetheless, you are encouraged to learn as much as possible. **NOTE: It might take you a few days to fully install your system how you like, depending on how much you need to read. Patience is key, especially for new users.** -The Arch wiki will sometimes use bad language, such as calling the whole +The ArchWiki will sometimes use bad language, such as calling the whole system Linux, using the term **open-source**/**closed-source**, and it will sometimes recommend the use of proprietary software. -You need to be careful about this when reading anything on the Arch wiki. +You need to be careful about this when reading anything on ArchWiki. Some of these steps require internet access. To get initial access for setting up the system (I'll go into networking later), @@ -121,14 +121,14 @@ before. In general, keeping notes (such as what I have done with this page) can be very useful as a reference in the future (e.g, if you wanted to re-install it, or install the distro on another computer). -You should also read the Arch wiki article on [System Maintenance](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/System_maintenance), +You should also read the ArchWiki article on [System Maintenance](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/System_maintenance), before continuing. Also, read their article on [enhancing system stability](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Enhance_system_stability). This is important, so make sure to read them both!* Install `smartmontools`; it can be used to check smart data. HDDs use non-free firmware inside; it's transparent to you, but the smart data comes from it. Therefore, don't rely on it too much), and then read -the Arch wiki [article](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/S.M.A.R.T.) on it, to learn how to use it: +the ArchWiki [article](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/S.M.A.R.T.) on it, to learn how to use it: # pacman -S smartmontools @@ -195,7 +195,7 @@ for generating secure passphrases. ### Configure sudo Now that we have a normal user account, we'll want to configure `sudo`, so that user is able to run commands as **root** (e.g., installing software); -this will be necessary to flash the ROM later on. Refer to the Arch wiki's [sudo](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Sudo) documentation. +this will be necessary to flash the ROM later on. Refer to ArchWiki's [sudo](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Sudo) documentation. The first step is to install the `sudo` package: @@ -237,8 +237,8 @@ a sound manager (to make sure you can hear sound through speakers or headphones) or DHCP (which allows you to get an IP address, to connect to the internet). These are just a few examples; there are countless others. -`systemd` is a controversial init system; [here](https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?pid=1149530#p1149530) -is an explanation behind the Arch development team's decision to use it. +`systemd` is a controversial init system; A [forum post](https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?pid=1149530#p1149530) +has an explanation behind the Arch development team's decision to use it. The **manpage** should also help: @@ -280,7 +280,7 @@ To delete the temporary files, you can use the `clean` option: # systemd-tmpfiles --clean According to the **manpage**, this *"cleans all files and directories with -an age parameter"*. According to the Arch wiki, this reads information +an age parameter"*. According to ArchWiki, this reads information in **/etc/tmpfiles.d** and **/usr/lib/tmpfiles.d**, to know what actions to perform. Therefore, it is a good idea to read what's stored in these locations, to get a better understanding. @@ -319,7 +319,7 @@ In the end, I decided not to install anything from it, but I kept the repository enabled regardless. ## Setup a Network Connection in Parabola -Read the Arch wiki guide to [Configuring the Network](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Configuring_Network). +Read the ArchWiki guide to [Configuring the Network](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Configuring_Network). ### Set the Hostname This should be the same as the hostname that you set in **/etc/hostname**, @@ -348,7 +348,7 @@ The `hostname` utility is part of the `inetutils` package, and is in the **core* installed by default (as part of the **base** package). ### Network Status -According to the Arch wiki, [udev](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Udev) should already detect +According to ArchWiki, [udev](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Udev) should already detect the ethernet chipset, and automatically load the driver for it at boot time. You can check this in the **Ethernet controller** section, when running the `lspci` command: @@ -366,7 +366,7 @@ In my case, I did: # dmesg | grep e1000e ### Network Device Names -According to the Arch wiki guide on [Configuring Network Device Names](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Configuring_Network#Device_names), +According to the ArchWiki guide on [Configuring Network Device Names](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Configuring_Network#Device_names), it is important to note that the old interface names that you might be used to (e.g., `eth0`, `wlan0`, `wwan0`, etc.), if you come from a distribution like Debian or Trisquel, are no longer applicable. Instead, `systemd` creates device names @@ -375,7 +375,7 @@ with a fixed identifier that it automatically generates. An example device name for your ethernet chipset would be `enp0s25`, and is never supposed to change. -If you want to enable the old names, the Arch wiki recommends adding `net.ifnames=0` +If you want to enable the old names, ArchWiki recommends adding `net.ifnames=0` to your kernel parameters (in Libreboot context, this would be accomplished by following the instructions in [How to replace the default GRUB configuration file](grub_cbfs.md)). @@ -401,7 +401,7 @@ that you could use. Since we are going with the *MATE Desktop Environment*, we will primarily be following the instructions on the [Arch Linux Package Repository](https://wiki.mate-desktop.org/archlinux_custom_repo) page, but will also refer to the [General Recommendations](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/General_recommendations#Graphical_user_interface) -on the Arch wiki. +on ArchWiki. ### Installing Xorg The first step is to install [**Xorg**](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Xorg); @@ -433,14 +433,14 @@ Other drivers (not just video) can be found by looking at the `xorg-drivers` gro so you will notice that the layout you set in **/etc/vconsole.conf** earlier might not actually be the same in `xorg`. -Check the Arch wiki's article on [Xorg's keyboard configuration](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Keyboard_configuration_in_Xorg), for more information. +Check ArchWiki's article on [Xorg's keyboard configuration](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Keyboard_configuration_in_Xorg), for more information. To see what layout you currently use, try this on a terminal emulator in `xorg`: # setxkbmap -print -verbose 10 I'm simply using the default Qwerty (US) keyboard, so there isn't anything I need -to change here; if you do need to make any changes, the Arch wiki recommends two ways +to change here; if you do need to make any changes, ArchWiki recommends two ways of doing it: manually updating [configuration files](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Keyboard_configuration_in_Xorg#Using_X_configuration_files) or using the [localectl](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Keyboard_configuration_in_Xorg#Using_localectl) command. ### Installing MATE @@ -450,7 +450,7 @@ if we want all of the MATE Desktop, we need to install two packages: # pacman -Syy mate mate-extra The last step is to install a Display Manager; for MATE, we will be using `lightdm` -(it's the recommended Display Manager for the MATE Desktop); for this, we'll follow the insructions [here](https://wiki.mate-desktop.org/archlinux_custom_repo#display_manager_recommended), +(it's the recommended Display Manager for the MATE Desktop); for this, we'll folow the instructions [on the MATE wiki](https://wiki.mate-desktop.org/archlinux_custom_repo#display_manager_recommended), with one small change: the `lightdm-gtk3-greeter` package doesn't exist in Parabola's repositories. So, instead we will install the `lightdm-gtk-greeter` package; it performs the same function. @@ -466,14 +466,15 @@ as well as the service that will prompt us with a login window, `accounts-daemon # systemctl enable accounts-daemon Now you have installed the *MATE Desktop Environment*,If you wanted -to install another desktop environment, check out some [other options](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Desktop_environment) on the the Arch wiki. +to install another desktop environment, check out some [other options](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Desktop_environment) on ArchWiki. ### Configuring Network Manager in MATE Now that we have installed the Mate Desktop environment, and booted into it, we need to set up the network configuration in our graphical environment. -The MATE Desktop wiki recommends that we use Network Manager; the Arch wiki article -about it can be found [here](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/NetworkManager). +The MATE Desktop wiki recommends that we use Network Manager; an +article about Network Manager can be found +[on ArchWiki](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/NetworkManager). We need to install the NetworkManager package: diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md b/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md @@ -20,12 +20,15 @@ This guide borrows heavily from the Parabola wiki, and will constantly link to i For those new to Parabola GNU+Linux-Libre, check their [Beginner section](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Beginners) for an overview. ## Minumum Requirements -You can find the minimum requirements to run Parabola GNU+Linux [here](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Minimum_system_requirements). +You can find the minimum requirements to run Parabola GNU+Linux +[on the Parabola wiki](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Minimum_system_requirements). ## Preparation ### Download the latest ISO -For this guide, I used the *2016.11.03* ISO; the most current image is available [here](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Get_Parabola#Main_live_ISO). +For this guide, I used the *2016.11.03* ISO; the most current image is +available on Parabola's +[downloads page](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Get_Parabola#Main_live_ISO). If you are a complete beginner with GNU+Linux, choose the *Mate Desktop ISO*. it is easier to install Parabola with this version, because it allows you @@ -251,7 +254,7 @@ The setup of the drive and partitions is now complete; it's time to actually ins The first step of the actual installation is to choose the server from where we will need to download the packages; for this, we will again refer to the [Parabola Wiki](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Select_a_mirror). For beginners, I recommend that the edit the file using `nano` (a command-line text editor); -you can learn more about it [here](https://www.nano-editor.org/); for non-beginners, +you can learn more about it on [their website](https://www.nano-editor.org/); for non-beginners, simply edit it with your favorite text editor. ## Install the Base System @@ -261,7 +264,7 @@ refer to [Install the Base System](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#I ## Generate an fstab The next step in the process is to generate a file known as an **fstab**; the purpose of this file is for the operating system to identify the storage device -used by your installation. [Here](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Generate_an_fstab) are the instructions to generate that file. +used by your installation. [On the Parabola beginner's guide](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Generate_an_fstab) are the instructions to generate that file. ## Chroot into and Configure the System Now, you need to `chroot` into your new installation, to complete the setup @@ -270,29 +273,30 @@ of an operating system to a different one; in this instance, it means changing directory to the one you created in the previous steps, so that you can modify files and install software onto it, as if it were the host operating system. -To `chroot` into your installation, follow the instructions [here](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Chroot_and_configure_the_base_system). +To `chroot` into your installation, follow the instructions [on the +Prabola beginner's guide](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Chroot_and_configure_the_base_system). ### Setting up the Locale Locale refers to the language that your operating system will use, as well as some other considerations related to the region in which you live. To set this up, -follow the instructions [here](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Locale). +follow the instructions [in the Parabola beginner's guide](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Locale). ### Setting up the Consolefont and Keymap -This will determine the keyboard layout of your new installation; follow the instructions [here](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Console_font_and_keymap). +This will determine the keyboard layout of your new installation; follow the instructions [in the Parabola beginner's guide](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Console_font_and_keymap). ### Setting up the Time Zone You'll need to set your current time zone in the operating system; this will enable applications that require accurate time to work properly (e.g., the web browser). -To do this, follow the instructions [here](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Time_zone). +To do this, follow the instructions [in the Parabola beginner's guide](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Time_zone). ### Setting up the Hardware Clock To make sure that your computer has the right time, you'll have to set the time in your computer's internal clock. -Follow the instructions [here](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Hardware_clock) to do that. +Follow the instructions [in the Parabola beginner's guide](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Hardware_clock) to do that. ### Setting up the Kernel Modules Now we need to make sure that the kernel has all the modules that it needs to boot the operating system. To do this, we need to edit a file called **mkinitcpio.conf**. -More information about this file can be found [here](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Mkinitcpio), +More information about this file can be found [in the Parabola beginner's guide](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Mkinitcpio), but for the sake of this guide, you simply need to run the following command. # nano /etc/mkinitcpio.conf @@ -334,7 +338,7 @@ Then, we update both kernels like this, using the `mkinitcpio` command: ### Setting up the Hostname Now we need to set up the hostname for the system; this is so that our device -can be identified by the network. Refer to [this section](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Hostname) +can be identified by the network. Refer to [the hostname section](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Hostname) of the Parabola wiki's Beginner's Guide. You can make the hostname anything you like; for example, if you wanted to choose the hostname **parabola**, you would run the `echo` command, like this: @@ -351,8 +355,8 @@ And then you would modify **/etc/hosts** like this, adding the hostname to it: ### Configure the Network Now that we have a hostname, we need to configure the settings for the rest of the network. -Instructions for setting up a wired connection are [here](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Wired), -and instructions for setting up a wireless connection are [here](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Wireless_2). +Instructions for setting up a wired connection are [in the Parabola beginner's guide](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Wired), +and instructions for setting up a wireless connection are [in the Parabola beginner's guide](https://wiki.parabola.nu/Beginners%27_guide#Wireless_2). ### Set the root Password The **root** account has control over all the files in the computer; for security, diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md b/docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md @@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ However, both ways will require us to download the Libreboot Utility Archive. ### Download the Libreboot Utility Archive The Libreboot Utility Archive contains the programs that we'll need to get our **grubtest.cfg** file. The latest release of the Libreboot Utility Archive -can be downloaded from libreboot.org, [here](https://www.mirrorservice.org/sites/libreboot.org/release/stable/20160907/libreboot_r20160907_util.tar.xz). +can be downloaded [from libreboot.org](https://www.mirrorservice.org/sites/libreboot.org/release/stable/20160907/libreboot_r20160907_util.tar.xz). The quickest way to download it would be to use the `wget` program, which (if you don't know) allows you to download files from the internet. @@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ image file is named **libreboot.rom**, so please make sure to adapt. There are two ways to get a pre-compiled ROM image: #### 1. Download a Pre-Compiled Image from the Libreboot Website -For the current release, **20160907**, they can be found [here](https://www.mirrorservice.org/sites/libreboot.org/release/stable/20160907/rom/grub/); +For the current release, **20160907**, they can be found [on a Libreboot mirror](https://www.mirrorservice.org/sites/libreboot.org/release/stable/20160907/rom/grub/); please adopt this guide, if using a different version of Libreboot. You also need to make sure that you select both the correct ROM for the device you're using, @@ -219,7 +219,7 @@ Or, replace it with this, if you are using a Debian-based distribution (e.g., Tr initrd /initrd.img Remember, that these names come from the instructions to install GNU+Linux -on Libreboot systems, located [here](index.md). If you followed different instructions, +on Libreboot systems, located [in the docs](index.md). If you followed different instructions, (or for some other reason, used different names), simply put the names of your **root** and **swap** volumes, in place of the ones used here. diff --git a/docs/install/bbb_setup.md b/docs/install/bbb_setup.md @@ -40,7 +40,7 @@ Shopping list (pictures of this hardware is shown later): (rev. C) is highly recommended. You can buy one from [Adafruit](https://www.adafruit.com) (USA), [ElectroKit](http://electrokit.com) (Sweden) or any of the - distributors listed [here](http://beagleboard.org/black) (look below + distributors listed on [BeagleBoard's website](http://beagleboard.org/black) (look below 'Purchase'). We recommend this product because we know that it works well for our purposes and doesn't require any non-free software. diff --git a/docs/install/x200_external.md b/docs/install/x200_external.md @@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ Run this command on x200 to find out flash chip model and its size: The X200S and X200 Tablet will use a WSON-8 flash chip, on the bottom of the motherboard (this requires removal of the motherboard). Not all X200S/X200T are -supported; see [here](../hardware/x200.html#x200s). +supported; see the [hardware](../hardware/x200.html#x200s) page. MAC address =========== diff --git a/docs/misc/bbb_ehci.md b/docs/misc/bbb_ehci.md @@ -143,7 +143,7 @@ arm-linux-gnueabihf setup on your *host*. $ cp configs/beaglebone kernel/arch/arm/configs/beaglebone_defconfig - Download the patch from - [here](http://www.coreboot.org/images/8/88/Ehci-debug-gadget-patches.tar.gz) + [coreboot.org](http://www.coreboot.org/images/8/88/Ehci-debug-gadget-patches.tar.gz) - tar -xf Ehci-debug-gadget-patches.tar.gz (will create dir: usbdebug-gadget) - Note that there are two patches (patch\_1 and patch\_2) for each of @@ -228,7 +228,7 @@ one^[2](#___fn2)^ should be = y ^2^ The g\_dbgp module on BeagleBone Black (Rev. C) reports it self as Net20DC, the other options are for older BB(B) - ver1. This is documented -[here](https://johnlewis.ie/coreboot-ehci-debug-gadget-demonstration/) +[on John Lewis's blog](https://johnlewis.ie/coreboot-ehci-debug-gadget-demonstration/) (also tested/verified). Then:\ diff --git a/www/download.md b/www/download.md @@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ Do you have a mirror? --------------------- Let us know! We will add it here. Instructions for how to mirror -libreboot releases can be found [here](#rsync). +libreboot releases can be found [on the mirrors](#https). HTTPS mirrors {#https} ------------- @@ -108,4 +108,4 @@ Libreboot includes statically linked executables. If you need the sources for those statically linked dependencies inside the executables, then you can contact the libreboot project using the details on the home page; source code will be provided. You can download this source code -from [here](ccsource/). +from [the "ccsource" directory](ccsource/) on libreboot.org. diff --git a/www/faq.md b/www/faq.md @@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Important issues What version of libreboot do I have? ---------------------------------------------------------------- -[See here](../docs/#version) +See "Version" [in the documentation](../docs/#version) Flashrom complains about DEVMEM access -------------------------------------- @@ -89,7 +89,7 @@ Hardware compatibility What systems are compatible with libreboot? ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -[See here](docs/hardware/). +See the [hardware compatibility list](docs/hardware/). Will the Purism laptops be supported? ---------------------------------------------------------------------- diff --git a/www/index.md b/www/index.md @@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ operating system. It is also available preinstalled from We provide user support via [\#libreboot IRC](https://webchat.freenode.net/?channels=libreboot) on Freenode. Development discussion also occurs on IRC. Instructions for sending patches are -[here](git.md). +on the [git](git.md) page. Why use Libreboot? ------------------ diff --git a/www/news/new-mailing-lists.md b/www/news/new-mailing-lists.md @@ -9,8 +9,8 @@ The mailing list address is [development@libreboot.org](mailto:development@libreboot.org) Information about the mailing list and how to subscribe are -[here](../lists/). Archives of discussion threads -are [here](../pipermail/development/). +on the [lists page](../lists/). Archives of discussion threads +are in the [pipermail development directory](../pipermail/development/). This replaces the mailing lists that we had before. The mailing list software in use is [GNU Mailman](https://www.gnu.org/software/mailman/), which is also