libreboot

Unnamed repository; edit this file 'description' to name the repository.
Log | Files | Refs | README

commit 1eb5130a1c70a7238548d977e9c6f371c007eed7
parent b62dbec1e23f03ae944b51fc4b510dc56ed9b83e
Author: Alyssa Rosenzweig <alyssa@rosenzweig.io>
Date:   Fri, 17 Mar 2017 23:15:09 -0700

It wasn't me, I swear!

Diffstat:
docs/archive_old.md | 18++++++++++++------
docs/bsd/freebsd.md | 30++++++++++++++++++++----------
docs/bsd/index.md | 3++-
docs/bsd/netbsd.md | 39++++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------
docs/bsd/openbsd.md | 39++++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------
docs/depthcharge/index.md | 63++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------
docs/distros/index.md | 6++++--
docs/fsf-distros/index.md | 3++-
docs/future/index.md | 81+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------
docs/future/old.md | 12++++++++----
docs/git/index.md | 78++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------------------
docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md | 255+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------
docs/gnulinux/encrypted_debian.md | 42++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------
docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md | 309+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------
docs/gnulinux/grub_boot_installer.md | 87+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------
docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md | 48++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++----------------
docs/gnulinux/grub_hardening.md | 3++-
docs/gnulinux/index.md | 3++-
docs/grub/index.md | 30++++++++++++++++++++----------
docs/hardware/dock.md | 3++-
docs/hardware/index.md | 3++-
docs/hardware/t60_heatsink.md | 42++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------
docs/hardware/t60_lcd_15.md | 27++++++++++++++++++---------
docs/hardware/t60_security.md | 150+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------
docs/hardware/x60_heatsink.md | 54++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++------------------
docs/hardware/x60_keyboard.md | 15++++++++++-----
docs/hardware/x60_lcd_change.md | 3++-
docs/hardware/x60_security.md | 98++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------
docs/hcl/c201.md | 3++-
docs/hcl/d510mo.md | 3++-
docs/hcl/d945gclf.md | 63++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------
docs/hcl/ga-g41m-es2l.md | 6++++--
docs/hcl/gm45_remove_me.md | 54++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++------------------
docs/hcl/imac52.md | 3++-
docs/hcl/index.md | 24++++++++++++++++--------
docs/hcl/kcma-d8.md | 3++-
docs/hcl/kfsn4-dre.md | 3++-
docs/hcl/kgpe-d16.md | 3++-
docs/hcl/r400.md | 3++-
docs/hcl/t400.md | 3++-
docs/hcl/t500.md | 6++++--
docs/hcl/x200.md | 9++++++---
docs/index.md | 30++++++++++++++++++++----------
docs/install/bbb_setup.md | 42++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------
docs/install/c201.md | 42++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------
docs/install/d510mo.md | 9++++++---
docs/install/d945gclf.md | 6++++--
docs/install/ga-g41m-es2l.md | 15++++++++++-----
docs/install/index.md | 39++++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------
docs/install/kcma-d8.md | 3++-
docs/install/kgpe-d16.md | 3++-
docs/install/r400_external.md | 114+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------
docs/install/rpi_setup.md | 12++++++++----
docs/install/t400_external.md | 102+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------
docs/install/t500_external.md | 117+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------
docs/install/t60_unbrick.md | 138+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------
docs/install/x200_external.md | 72++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++------------------------
docs/install/x60_unbrick.md | 159+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------
docs/install/x60tablet_unbrick.md | 72++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++------------------------
docs/misc/bbb_ehci.md | 21++++++++++++++-------
docs/misc/index.md | 36++++++++++++++++++++++++------------
docs/misc/patch.md | 45++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------
docs/release.md | 3++-
63 files changed, 1873 insertions(+), 937 deletions(-)

diff --git a/docs/archive_old.md b/docs/archive_old.md @@ -424,7 +424,8 @@ Changes for this release (latest changes first, earliest changes last) - build: Only generate the GRUB configurations once (re-use on all images) - Only build 2 GRUB payload executables, re-use on all boards. -- resources/utilities/grub-assemble/gen.txtmode.sh: Use GNU BASH\ +- resources/utilities/grub-assemble/gen.txtmode.sh: Use GNU BASH + resources/utilities/grub-assemble/gen.vesafb.sh: Use GNU BASH - scripts (error handling): Replace exit with exit 1 (make debugging easier) @@ -627,7 +628,8 @@ Revisions for r20140903 (6th beta) (3rd September 2014) - Added gcry\_serpent and gcry\_whirlpool to the GRUB module list in the 'build' script (for luks users) - **Libreboot is now based on a new coreboot version from August 23rd, - 2014:\ + 2014: + Merged commits (relates to boards that were already supported in libreboot):** - <http://review.coreboot.org/#/c/6697/> @@ -748,10 +750,13 @@ Revisions for r20140903 (6th beta) (3rd September 2014) ohci, uhci, usb, usbserial\_pl2303, usbserial\_ftdi, usbserial\_usbdebug - set prefix=(memdisk)/boot/grub - - For native graphics (recommended by coreboot wiki):\ - gfxpayload=keep\ + - For native graphics (recommended by coreboot wiki): + + gfxpayload=keep + terminal\_output \--append gfxterm - - Play a beep on startup:\ + - Play a beep on startup: + play 480 440 1 - Documentation: updated gnulinux/grub\_cbfs.html to make it safer (and easier) to follow. @@ -1340,7 +1345,8 @@ Development notes -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/bsd/freebsd.md b/docs/bsd/freebsd.md @@ -61,17 +61,21 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in LibertyBSD or OpenBSD) If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or OpenBSD system, here is how to create the bootable FreeBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + $ dmesg | tail -Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ +Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3: + $ disklabel sd3 Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ +example: + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the -FreeBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ +FreeBSD installer to it with dd. For example: + $ doas dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. @@ -84,18 +88,22 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in GNU+Linux) If you downloaded your ISO on a GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable FreeBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + $ dmesg -Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ +Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is: + $ lsblk Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ +example: + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX* # umount /dev/sdX* dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your -distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ +distro ISO to it with dd. For example: + $ sudo dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync # dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync @@ -165,8 +173,10 @@ numbers may differ. Use TAB completion. -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ -Copyright © 2016 Scott Bonds <scott@ggr.com>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + +Copyright © 2016 Scott Bonds <scott@ggr.com> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/bsd/index.md b/docs/bsd/index.md @@ -17,7 +17,8 @@ instructions have yet to be written.** -Copyright © 2016 Scott Bonds <scott@ggr.com>\ +Copyright © 2016 Scott Bonds <scott@ggr.com> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/bsd/netbsd.md b/docs/bsd/netbsd.md @@ -57,17 +57,21 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in LibertyBSD or NetBSD) If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or NetBSD system, here is how to create the bootable NetBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + $ dmesg | tail -Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ +Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3: + $ disklabel sd3 Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ +example: + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the -NetBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ +NetBSD installer to it with dd. For example: + $ doas netbsd.iso of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. @@ -80,18 +84,22 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in GNU+Linux) If you downloaded your ISO on a GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable NetBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + $ dmesg -Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ +Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is: + $ lsblk Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ +example: + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX* # umount /dev/sdX* dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your -distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ +distro ISO to it with dd. For example: + $ sudo dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync # dd if=netbsd.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync @@ -149,9 +157,12 @@ On your NetBSD root partition, create the **/grub** directory and add the file **libreboot\_grub.cfg** to it. Inside the **libreboot\_grub.cfg** add these lines: -**default=0 timeout=3 menuentry "NetBSD" {\ -    knetbsd -r wd0a (ahci0,netbsd1)/netbsd\ -}\ +**default=0 timeout=3 menuentry "NetBSD" { + +    knetbsd -r wd0a (ahci0,netbsd1)/netbsd + +} + ** The next time you boot, you'll see the old Grub menu for a few seconds, @@ -182,8 +193,10 @@ numbers may differ. Use TAB completion. -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ -Copyright © 2016 Scott Bonds <scott@ggr.com>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + +Copyright © 2016 Scott Bonds <scott@ggr.com> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/bsd/openbsd.md b/docs/bsd/openbsd.md @@ -39,17 +39,21 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in LibertyBSD or OpenBSD) If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or OpenBSD system, here is how to create the bootable LibertyBSD/OpenBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + $ dmesg | tail -Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ +Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3: + $ disklabel sd3 Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ +example: + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the -OpenBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ +OpenBSD installer to it with dd. For example: + $ doas dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. @@ -79,18 +83,22 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in GNU+Linux) If you downloaded your ISO on a GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable OpenBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + $ dmesg -Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ +Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is: + $ lsblk Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ +example: + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX* # umount /dev/sdX* dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your -distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ +distro ISO to it with dd. For example: + $ sudo dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync # dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync @@ -170,9 +178,12 @@ On your OpenBSD root partition, create the **/grub** directory and add the file **libreboot\_grub.cfg** to it. Inside the **libreboot\_grub.cfg** add these lines: -**default=0 timeout=3 menuentry "OpenBSD" {\ -    kopenbsd -r sd0a (ahci0,openbsd1)/bsd\ -}\ +**default=0 timeout=3 menuentry "OpenBSD" { + +    kopenbsd -r sd0a (ahci0,openbsd1)/bsd + +} + ** The next time you boot, you'll see the old Grub menu for a few seconds, @@ -203,8 +214,10 @@ numbers may differ. Use TAB completion. -Copyright © 2016 Scott Bonds <scott@ggr.com>\ -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2016 Scott Bonds <scott@ggr.com> + +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/depthcharge/index.md b/docs/depthcharge/index.md @@ -42,7 +42,8 @@ Developer mode screen {#developer_mode_screen} ===================== The developer mode screen can be accessed in depthcharge when developer -mode is enabled.\ +mode is enabled. + Developer mode can be enabled from the [recovery mode screen](#recovery_mode_screen). @@ -65,7 +66,8 @@ Booting normally {#booting_normally} ---------------- As instructed on the developer mode screen, a regular boot will happen -after **3 seconds** (if developer mode screen is not held).\ +after **3 seconds** (if developer mode screen is not held). + The default boot medium (internal storage, external media, legacy payload) is shown on screen. @@ -77,7 +79,8 @@ Booting from different mediums {#booting_different_mediums} Depthcharge allows booting from different mediums, when they are allowed (see [configuring verified boot parameters](#configuring_verified_boot_parameters) to enable or disable -boot mediums).\ +boot mediums). + As instructed on the developer mode screen, booting from various mediums can be triggered by pressing various key combinations: @@ -91,9 +94,11 @@ Showing device information {#showing_device_information} -------------------------- As instructed on the developer mode screen, showing device information -can be triggered by pressing **Ctrl + I** or **Tab**.\ +can be triggered by pressing **Ctrl + I** or **Tab**. + Various information is shown, including vboot non-volatile data, TPM -status, GBB flags and key hashes.\ +status, GBB flags and key hashes. + @@ -125,19 +130,22 @@ Recovering from a bad state {#recovering_bad_state} When the device fails to verify the signature of a piece of the boot software or when an error occurs, it is considered to be in a bad state -and will instruct the user to reboot to recovery mode.\ +and will instruct the user to reboot to recovery mode. + Recovery mode boots using only software located in write-protected memory, that is considered to be trusted and safe. Recovery mode then allows recovering the device by booting from a trusted recovery media, that is automatically detected when recovery mode starts. When no external media is found or when the recovery media -is invalid, instructions are shown on screen.\ +is invalid, instructions are shown on screen. + Trusted recovery media are external media (USB drives, SD cards, etc) that hold a kernel signed with the recovery key. Google provides images of such recovery media for Chrome OS (which are -not advised to users as they contain proprietary software).\ +not advised to users as they contain proprietary software). + They are signed with Google's recovery keys, that are pre-installed on the device when it ships. @@ -152,7 +160,8 @@ Enabling developer mode {#enabling_developer_mode} ----------------------- As instructed on the recovery mode screen, developer mode can be enabled -by pressing **Ctrl + D**.\ +by pressing **Ctrl + D**. + Instructions to confirm enabling developer mode are then shown on screen. @@ -164,7 +173,8 @@ Configuring verified boot parameters {#configuring_verified_boot_parameters} Depthcharge's behavior relies on the verified boot (vboot) reference implementation, that can be configured with parameters stored in the -verified boot non-volatile storage.\ +verified boot non-volatile storage. + These parameters can be modified with the **crossystem** tool, that requires sufficient privileges to access the verified boot non-volatile storage. @@ -174,7 +184,8 @@ boot non-volatile storage on some devices. **crossystem** and **mosys** are both free software and their source code is made available by Google: [crossystem](https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromiumos/platform/vboot_reference/). -[mosys](https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromiumos/platform/mosys/).\ +[mosys](https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromiumos/platform/mosys/). + These tools are not distributed along with Libreboot yet. However, they are preinstalled on the device, with ChromeOS. @@ -187,32 +198,42 @@ security of the device. The following parameters can be configured: - Kernels signature verification: - - Enabled with:\ + - Enabled with: + # **crossystem dev\_boot\_signed\_only=1** - - Disabled with:\ + - Disabled with: + # **crossystem dev\_boot\_signed\_only=0** - External media boot: - - Enabled with:\ + - Enabled with: + # **crossystem dev\_boot\_usb=1** - - Disabled with:\ + - Disabled with: + # **crossystem dev\_boot\_usb=0** - Legacy payload boot: - - Enabled with:\ + - Enabled with: + # **crossystem dev\_boot\_legacy=1** - - Disabled with:\ + - Disabled with: + # **crossystem dev\_boot\_legacy=0** - Default boot medium: - - Internal storage:\ + - Internal storage: + # **crossystem dev\_default\_boot=disk** - - External media:\ + - External media: + # **crossystem dev\_default\_boot=usb** - - Legacy payload:\ + - Legacy payload: + # **crossystem dev\_default\_boot=legacy** -Copyright © 2015 Paul Kocialkowski <contact@paulk.fr>\ +Copyright © 2015 Paul Kocialkowski <contact@paulk.fr> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/distros/index.md b/docs/distros/index.md @@ -20,7 +20,8 @@ FSF-endorsed distros Many FSF-endorsed GNU+Linux distributions are considered unfit for general use by the libreboot project. You can read about their problems -here:\ +here: + [Why we can't endorse many FSF-endorsed distributions](../fsf-distros/). @@ -100,7 +101,8 @@ We recommend using the *MATE* desktop. -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/fsf-distros/index.md b/docs/fsf-distros/index.md @@ -74,7 +74,8 @@ It's a dead project. -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/future/index.md b/docs/future/index.md @@ -71,39 +71,60 @@ i945 VRAM size {#i945_vram_size} ============== Apparently, only 8MB VRAM is available on i945 GPUs (though it could do -64MB):\ +64MB): + phcoder: No. Hardware default is 8 MiB. When I wanted to make it configurable, I saw that docs mention only one other alternative: 1MiB. Later isn't event enough for 1024x768 at 24bpp without any acceleration or double buffering. It's possible that there are undocumented values. Which options do you have in vendor BIOS? How to find out how much vram -you have:\ -phcoder: TOM - BSM\ -phcoder: check what vendor BIOS offers as options\ -vimuser: I thought it could do 64MB usually\ -phcoder: not accorging to doc.\ -phcoder: see mobile-945-express-chipset-datasheet page 93\ +you have: + +phcoder: TOM - BSM + +phcoder: check what vendor BIOS offers as options + +vimuser: I thought it could do 64MB usually + +phcoder: not accorging to doc. + +phcoder: see mobile-945-express-chipset-datasheet page 93 + phcoder: see also -src/northbridge/intel/i945/{early\_init,northbridge,gma}.c\ -vimuser: "011 = DVMT (UMA) mode, 8 MB of memory pre-allocated for\ -vimuser: frame buffer."\ -vimuser: "Others - reserved"\ +src/northbridge/intel/i945/{early\_init,northbridge,gma}.c + +vimuser: "011 = DVMT (UMA) mode, 8 MB of memory pre-allocated for + +vimuser: frame buffer." + +vimuser: "Others - reserved" + phcoder: the easiest way is a loop at this position which tries -different values and reads (and prints) BSM with them\ +different values and reads (and prints) BSM with them + stefanct: vimuser: they suggest that you change the value and look how -BSM reacts to that\ -stefanct: as they pointed out earlier vram size = TOM - BSM\ -stefanct: different values of GMS\ +BSM reacts to that + +stefanct: as they pointed out earlier vram size = TOM - BSM + +stefanct: different values of GMS + stefanct: phcoder: hm... this could be a hint. look at the text -description of TOLUD at page 103\ -stefanct: it mentions 64 MB in the text about BSM as well\ -stefanct: table 18...\ +description of TOLUD at page 103 + +stefanct: it mentions 64 MB in the text about BSM as well + +stefanct: table 18... + phcoder: stefanct: I have a guess which value make is 64 but I will not -tell to avoid skewing test results\ +tell to avoid skewing test results + stefanct: phcoder: sure... i assumed you were not sure if it supports -it at all. testing it properly is of course a good idea :)\ +it at all. testing it properly is of course a good idea :) + stefanct: test the various possible (but reserved) values of GMS and see -what the resulting VRAM size is\ +what the resulting VRAM size is + vimuser: so, TOM - BSM [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -146,7 +167,8 @@ Original getregs.py script can be found at <http://hg.mtjm.eu/scripts/file/tip/intel-regs.py> written by Michał Masłowski. -About fixing remaining LCD panels on 5345:\ +About fixing remaining LCD panels on 5345: + 'polarity' is mentioned in coreboot log (cbmem -c). compare output (with working and non-working panel). (and see the other notes in docs/future/) @@ -162,9 +184,11 @@ How to dump EDID: # apt-get install i2c-tools # modprobe i2c-dev -Find out the correct ID to use:\ +Find out the correct ID to use: + # i2cdetect -l -Example:\ +Example: + # **i2cdump -y 2 0x50** Working panel: EDID dump from LG-Philips LP150E05-A2K1: @@ -324,8 +348,10 @@ Get intelvbttool here: <http://review.coreboot.org/#/c/5842> (util/intelvbttool). Now dump a copy of the running VGA BIOS: **$ sudo dd if=/dev/mem bs=64k -of=runningvga.bin skip=12 count=1**\ -Then do (and record the output):\ +of=runningvga.bin skip=12 count=1** + +Then do (and record the output): + $ ./intelvbttool runningvga.bin > intelvbttool\_out Backup both files (runningvga.bin and intelvbttool\_out), renaming them @@ -406,7 +432,8 @@ Other - unlisted (low priority) {#other} -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/future/old.md b/docs/future/old.md @@ -45,7 +45,8 @@ That's all! **This has also been backported into libreboot 5th release (line 1233 in src/mainboard/lenovo/x60/i915io.c)**. GNUtoo (Denis Carikli) told me about the register **BLC\_PWM\_CTL** and that you could set it to control backlight. I read that address using devmem2 while -running the VBIOS:\ +running the VBIOS: + # devmem2 0xe4361254 w The change is also included in libreboot 6. @@ -200,8 +201,10 @@ For historical purposes, here is a collection of IRC logs that once existed on this page, related to the issue: [kernel312\_irc](dumps/kernel312_irc). -PGETBL\_CTL differs between VBIOS (-) and native graphics init (+).\ -- PGETBL\_CTL: 0x3ffc0001\ +PGETBL\_CTL differs between VBIOS (-) and native graphics init (+). + +- PGETBL\_CTL: 0x3ffc0001 + + PGETBL\_CTL: 0x3f800001 GTT (graphics translation table) size is PGETBL\_save, max 256 KiB. BSM @@ -225,7 +228,8 @@ GTT (graphics translation table) size is PGETBL\_save, max 256 KiB. BSM -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/git/index.md b/docs/git/index.md @@ -32,13 +32,16 @@ statically compiled executables for the utilities are included.** For Debian Stretch (may also work on Debian Jessie), you can run the -following command:\ +following command: + $ sudo ./oldbuild dependencies debian (this will also work in Devuan) -For Parabola, you can run the following command:\ +For Parabola, you can run the following command: + $ sudo ./oldbuild dependencies parabola -or:\ +or: + # **./oldbuild dependencies parabola** @@ -62,21 +65,24 @@ First, [install the build dependencies](#build_dependencies). Since libreboot makes extensive use of git, you need to configure git properly. If you have not yet configured git, then the minimum -requirement is:\ +requirement is: + $ git config \--global user.name "Your Name" $ git config \--global user.email your@emailaddress.com This is what will also appear in git logs if you ever commit your own changes to a given repository. For more information, see <http://git-scm.com/doc>. -Another nice config for you (optional, but recommended):\ +Another nice config for you (optional, but recommended): + $ git config \--global core.editor nano $ git config \--global color.status auto $ git config \--global color.branch auto $ git config \--global color.interactive auto $ **git config \--global color.diff auto** -After that, run the script:\ +After that, run the script: + $ **./download all** What this did was download everything (grub, coreboot, memtest86+, @@ -122,7 +128,8 @@ the mainboard. Removing that battery removes power to BUC.TS, resetting the bit back to 0 (if you previously set it to 1). BUC.TS utility is included in libreboot\_src.tar.xz and -libreboot\_util.tar.xz.\ +libreboot\_util.tar.xz. + **If you downloaded from git, follow [#build\_meta](#build_meta) before you proceed.** @@ -135,10 +142,12 @@ If you have the binary release archive, you'll find executables under First, [install the build dependencies](#build_dependencies). -To build bucts, do this in the main directory:\ +To build bucts, do this in the main directory: + $ **./oldbuild module bucts** -To statically compile it, do this:\ +To statically compile it, do this: + $ **./oldbuild module bucts static** The "builddeps" script in libreboot\_src also makes use of @@ -155,7 +164,8 @@ Flashrom is the utility for flashing/dumping ROM images. This is what you will use to install libreboot. Flashrom source code is included in libreboot\_src.tar.xz and -libreboot\_util.tar.xz.\ +libreboot\_util.tar.xz. + **If you downloaded from git, follow [#build\_meta](#build_meta) before you proceed.** @@ -166,10 +176,12 @@ flashrom from source, continue reading. First, [install the build dependencies](#build_dependencies). -To build it, do the following in the main directory:\ +To build it, do the following in the main directory: + $ **./oldbuild module flashrom** -To statically compile it, do the following in the main directory:\ +To statically compile it, do the following in the main directory: + $ **./oldbuild module flashrom static** After you've done that, under ./flashrom/ you will find the following @@ -213,24 +225,29 @@ First, [install the build dependencies](#build_dependencies). If you downloaded libreboot from git, refer to [#build\_meta](#build_meta). -Build all of the components used in libreboot:\ +Build all of the components used in libreboot: + $ **./oldbuild module all** You can also build each modules separately, using *./oldbuild module -modulename*. To see the possible values for *modulename*, use:\ +modulename*. To see the possible values for *modulename*, use: + $ **./oldbuild module list** -After that, build the ROM images (for all boards):\ +After that, build the ROM images (for all boards): + $ ./oldbuild roms withgrub Alternatively, you can build for a specific board or set of boards. For -example:\ +example: + $ ./oldbuild roms withgrub x60 $ ./oldbuild roms withgrub x200\_8mb $ ./oldbuild roms withgrub x60 x200\_8mb The list of board options can be found by looking at the directory names in **resources/libreboot/config/grub/**. -To clean (reverse) everything, do the following:\ +To clean (reverse) everything, do the following: + $ **./oldbuild clean all** The ROM images will be stored under **bin/*payload*/**, where *payload* @@ -258,23 +275,29 @@ ${version} string on the directory under *release/oldbuildsystem/*, and in the file names of the archives. Otherwise, whatever git uses for *git describe \--tags HEAD* will be used. -Utilities (static executables):\ +Utilities (static executables): + $ **./oldbuild release util** -Archive containing flashrom and bucts source code:\ +Archive containing flashrom and bucts source code: + $ **./oldbuild release tobuild** Documentation archive (**does not work on \_src release archive, only -git**):\ +git**): + $ **./oldbuild release docs** -ROM image archives:\ +ROM image archives: + $ **./oldbuild release roms** -Source code archive:\ +Source code archive: + $ **./oldbuild release src** -SHA512 sums of all other release archives that have been generated:\ +SHA512 sums of all other release archives that have been generated: + $ **./oldbuild release sha512sums** If you are building on an i686 host, this will build statically linked @@ -303,7 +326,8 @@ libreboot\_util, for: - flashrom If you are building binaries on a live system or chroot (for -flashrom/bucts), you can use the following to statically link them:\ +flashrom/bucts), you can use the following to statically link them: + $ ./oldbuild module flashrom static $ **./oldbuild module bucts static** @@ -314,7 +338,8 @@ an X60/T60 while lenovo bios is present, working around the security restrictions). The command that you used for generating the release archives will also -run the following command:\ +run the following command: + $ ./oldbuild release tobuild The archive **tobuild.tar.xz** will have been created under **release/oldbuildsystem/**, containing bucts, flashrom and all other @@ -331,7 +356,8 @@ under **release/oldbuildsystem/rom/**. -Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md b/docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md @@ -96,12 +96,15 @@ careful about this when reading anything on the Arch wiki. Some of these steps require internet access. I'll go into networking -later but for now, I just connected my system to a switch and did:\ +later but for now, I just connected my system to a switch and did: + # systemctl start dhcpcd.service -You can stop it later by running:\ +You can stop it later by running: + # systemctl stop dhcpcd.service For most people this should be enough, but if you don't have DHCP on -your network then you should setup your network connection first:\ +your network then you should setup your network connection first: + [Setup network connection in Parabola](#network) @@ -128,12 +131,15 @@ Updating Parabola {#pacman_update} ----------------- In the end, I didn't change my configuration for pacman. When you are -updating, resync with the latest package names/versions:\ +updating, resync with the latest package names/versions: + # pacman -Syy (according to the wiki, -Syy is better than Sy because it refreshes the package list even if it appears to be up to date, which can be useful -when switching to another mirror).\ -Then, update the system:\ +when switching to another mirror). + +Then, update the system: + # **pacman -Syu** **Before installing packages with 'pacman -S', always update first, @@ -191,14 +197,16 @@ re-install it or install the distro on another computer, for example). ### Cleaning the package cache {#pacman_cacheclean} **The following is very important as you continue to use, update and -maintain your Parabola system:\ +maintain your Parabola system: + <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Pacman#Cleaning_the_package_cache>. Essentially, this guide talks about a directory that has to be cleaned once in a while, to prevent it from growing too big (it's a cache of old package information, updated automatically when you do anything in pacman).** -To clean out all old packages that are cached:\ +To clean out all old packages that are cached: + # **pacman -Sc** The wiki cautions that this should be used with care. For example, since @@ -207,7 +215,8 @@ want to revert back to an older package then it's useful to have the caches available. Only do this if you are sure that you won't need it. The wiki also mentions this method for removing everything from the -cache, including currently installed packages that are cached:\ +cache, including currently installed packages that are cached: + # pacman -Scc This is inadvisable, since it means re-downloading the package again if you wanted to quickly re-install it. This should only be used when disk @@ -218,7 +227,8 @@ space is at a premium. ### pacman command equivalents {#pacman_commandequiv} The following table lists other distro package manager commands, and -their equivalent in pacman:\ +their equivalent in pacman: + <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Pacman_Rosetta> [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -253,9 +263,11 @@ access to the entire operating system. Read the entire document linked to above, and then continue. -Add your user:\ +Add your user: + # useradd -m -G wheel -s /bin/bash *yourusername* -Set a password:\ +Set a password: + # **passwd *yourusername*** Use of the *diceware method* is recommended, for generating secure @@ -281,7 +293,8 @@ sshd (openssh), dhcp, etc. There are countless others. the background behind the decision by Arch (Parabola's upstream supplier) to use systemd. -The manpage should also help:\ +The manpage should also help: + # man systemd The section on 'unit types' is especially useful. @@ -292,16 +305,20 @@ implications later when the log gets too big. Based on instructions from the wiki, I will reduce the total size of the journal to 50MiB (the wiki recommends 50MiB). -Open /etc/systemd/journald.conf and find the line that says:\ -*#SystemMaxUse=*\ -Change it to say:\ +Open /etc/systemd/journald.conf and find the line that says: + +*#SystemMaxUse=* + +Change it to say: + *SystemMaxUse=50M* The wiki also recommended a method for forwarding journal output to TTY 12 (accessible by pressing ctrl+alt+f12, and you use ctrl+alt+\[F1-F12\] to switch between terminals). I decided not to enable it. -Restart journald:\ +Restart journald: + # **systemctl restart systemd-journald** The wiki recommends that if the journal gets too large, you can also @@ -312,9 +329,11 @@ delete older records when the journal size reaches it's limit (according to systemd developers). Finally, the wiki mentions 'temporary' files and the utility for -managing them.\ +managing them. + # man systemd-tmpfiles -The command for 'clean' is:\ +The command for 'clean' is: + # systemd-tmpfiles \--clean According to the manpage, this *"cleans all files and directories with an age parameter"*. According to the Arch wiki, this reads information @@ -324,7 +343,8 @@ locations to get a better understanding. I looked in /etc/tmpfiles.d/ and found that it was empty on my system. However, /usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/ contained some files. The first one was -etc.conf, containing information and a reference to this manpage:\ +etc.conf, containing information and a reference to this manpage: + # man tmpfiles.d Read that manpage, and then continue studying all the files. @@ -344,14 +364,18 @@ default base. It might be worth looking into what is available there, depending on your use case. I enabled it on my system, to see what was in it. Edit /etc/pacman.conf -and below the 'extra' section add:\ -*\[kernels\]\ +and below the 'extra' section add: + +*\[kernels\] + Include = /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist* -Now sync with the repository:\ +Now sync with the repository: + # **pacman -Syy** -List all available packages in this repository:\ +List all available packages in this repository: + # **pacman -Sl kernels** In the end, I decided not to install anything from it but I kept the @@ -372,16 +396,20 @@ Read <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Configuring_Network>. This should be the same as the hostname that you set in /etc/hostname when installing Parabola. You can also do it with systemd (do so now, if -you like):\ +you like): + # hostnamectl set-hostname *yourhostname* This writes the specified hostname to /etc/hostname. More information -can be found in these manpages:\ +can be found in these manpages: + # man hostname # info hostname # **man hostnamectl** -Add the same hostname to /etc/hosts, on each line. Example:\ -*127.0.0.1 localhost.localdomain localhost myhostname\ +Add the same hostname to /etc/hosts, on each line. Example: + +*127.0.0.1 localhost.localdomain localhost myhostname + ::1 localhost.localdomain localhost myhostname* You'll note that I set both lines; the 2nd line is for IPv6. More and @@ -399,16 +427,20 @@ According to the Arch wiki, [udev](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Udev) should already detect the ethernet chipset and load the driver for it automatically at boot time. You can check this in the *"Ethernet controller"* section when -running this command:\ +running this command: + # **lspci -v** Look at the remaining sections *'Kernel driver in use'* and *'Kernel -modules'*. In my case it was as follows:\ -*Kernel driver in use: e1000e\ +modules'*. In my case it was as follows: + +*Kernel driver in use: e1000e + Kernel modules: e1000e* Check that the driver was loaded by issuing *dmesg | grep module\_name*. -In my case, I did:\ +In my case, I did: + # **dmesg | grep e1000e** ### Network device names {#network_devicenames} @@ -430,10 +462,12 @@ instructions in [grub\_cbfs.html](grub_cbfs.html)). For background information, read [Predictable Network Interface Names](http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd/PredictableNetworkInterfaceNames/) -Show device names:\ +Show device names: + # **ls /sys/class/net** -Changing the device names is possible (I chose not to do it):\ +Changing the device names is possible (I chose not to do it): + <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Configuring_Network#Change_device_name> [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -442,7 +476,8 @@ Changing the device names is possible (I chose not to do it):\ I actually chose to ignore most of Networking section on the wiki. Instead, I plan to set up LXDE desktop with the graphical -network-manager client. Here is a list of network managers:\ +network-manager client. Here is a list of network managers: + <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/List_of_applications/Internet#Network_managers>. If you need to, set a static IP address (temporarily) using the networking guide and the Arch wiki, or start the dhcpcd service in @@ -462,7 +497,8 @@ is important, so make sure to read them!** Install smartmontools (it can be used to check smart data. HDDs use non-free firmware inside, but it's transparent to you but the smart -data comes from it. Therefore, don't rely on it too much):\ +data comes from it. Therefore, don't rely on it too much): + # pacman -S smartmontools Read <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/S.M.A.R.T.> to learn how to use it. @@ -487,38 +523,49 @@ provide LXDE by default. Based on <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Xorg>. -Firstly, install it!\ +Firstly, install it! + # pacman -S xorg-server I also recommend installing this (contains lots of useful tools, -including *xrandr*):\ +including *xrandr*): + # **pacman -S xorg-server-utils** Install the driver. For me this was *xf86-video-intel* on the ThinkPad -X60. T60 and macbook11/21 should be the same.\ +X60. T60 and macbook11/21 should be the same. + # pacman -S xf86-video-intel -For other systems you can try:\ +For other systems you can try: + # pacman -Ss xf86-video- | less Combined with looking at your *lspci* output, you can determine which driver is needed. By default, Xorg will revert to xf86-video-vesa which is a generic driver and doesn't provide true hardware acceleration. Other drivers (not just video) can be found by looking at the -*xorg-drivers* group:\ +*xorg-drivers* group: + # pacman -Sg xorg-drivers Mostly you will rely on a display manager, but in case you ever want to -start X without one:\ +start X without one: + # **pacman -S xorg-xinit** -<optional>\ -   Arch wiki recommends installing these, for testing that X works:\ +<optional> + +   Arch wiki recommends installing these, for testing that X works: +     # pacman -S xorg-twm xorg-xclock xterm -   Refer to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Xinitrc>. and test X:\ +   Refer to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Xinitrc>. and test X: +     # startx    When you are satisfied, type ***exit*** in xterm, inside the X -session.\ +session. +    Uninstall them (clutter. eww): # **pacman -S xorg-xinit xorg-twm -xorg-xclock xterm**\ +xorg-xclock xterm** + </optional> [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -535,7 +582,8 @@ will notice that the layout you set in /etc/vconsole.conf earlier might not actually be the same in X. To see what layout you currently use, try this on a terminal emulator in -X:\ +X: + # **setxkbmap -print -verbose 10** In my case, I wanted to use the Dvorak (UK) keyboard which is quite @@ -549,20 +597,30 @@ X60, with a 105-key UK keyboard). If you use an American keyboard *dvorak*. The Arch wiki recommends two different methods for setting the keyboard -layout:\ +layout: + <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Keyboard_configuration_in_Xorg#Using_X_configuration_files> -and\ +and + <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Keyboard_configuration_in_Xorg#Using_localectl>. -In my case, I chose to use the *configuration file* method:\ +In my case, I chose to use the *configuration file* method: + Create the file /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/10-keyboard.conf and put this -inside:\ -*Section "InputClass"\ -        Identifier "system-keyboard"\ -        MatchIsKeyboard "on"\ -        Option "XkbLayout" "gb"\ -        Option "XkbModel" "pc105"\ -        Option "XkbVariant" "dvorak"\ +inside: + +*Section "InputClass" + +        Identifier "system-keyboard" + +        MatchIsKeyboard "on" + +        Option "XkbLayout" "gb" + +        Option "XkbModel" "pc105" + +        Option "XkbVariant" "dvorak" + EndSection* For you, the steps above may differ if you have a different layout. If @@ -582,27 +640,34 @@ would like to try something different, refer to Refer to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/LXDE>. -Install it, choosing 'all' when asked for the default package list:\ +Install it, choosing 'all' when asked for the default package list: + # **pacman -S lxde obconf** -I didn't want the following, so I removed them:\ +I didn't want the following, so I removed them: + # **pacman -R lxmusic lxtask** -I also lazily installed all fonts:\ +I also lazily installed all fonts: + # **pacman -S $(pacman -Ssq ttf-)** -And a mail client:\ +And a mail client: + # **pacman -S icedove** In IceCat, go to *Preferences :: Advanced* and disable *GNU IceCat Health Report*. -I also like to install these:\ +I also like to install these: + # **pacman -S xsensors stress htop** -Enable LXDM (the default display manager, providing a graphical login):\ +Enable LXDM (the default display manager, providing a graphical login): + # systemctl enable lxdm.service -It will start when you boot up the system. To start it now, do:\ +It will start when you boot up the system. To start it now, do: + # **systemctl start lxdm.service** Log in with your standard (non-root) user that you created earlier. It @@ -610,18 +675,28 @@ is advisable to also create an xinitrc rule in case you ever want to start lxde without lxdm. Read <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Xinitrc>. -Open LXterminal:\ +Open LXterminal: + $ cp /etc/skel/.xinitrc \~ Open .xinitrc and add the following plus a line break at the bottom of -the file.\ -*# Probably not needed. The same locale info that we set before\ -# Based on advice from the LXDE wiki export LC\_ALL=en\_GB.UTF-8\ -export LANGUAGE=en\_GB.UTF-8\ -export LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8\ -\ -# Start lxde desktop\ -exec startlxde\ -* Now make sure that it is executable:\ +the file. + +*# Probably not needed. The same locale info that we set before + +# Based on advice from the LXDE wiki export LC\_ALL=en\_GB.UTF-8 + +export LANGUAGE=en\_GB.UTF-8 + +export LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8 + + + +# Start lxde desktop + +exec startlxde + +* Now make sure that it is executable: + $ **chmod +x .xinitrc** [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -647,7 +722,8 @@ NOTE TO SELF: come back to this later. ### LXDE - screenlock {#lxde_screenlock} -Arch wiki recommends to use *xscreensaver*:\ +Arch wiki recommends to use *xscreensaver*: + # **pacman -S xscreensaver** Under *Preferences :: Screensaver* in the LXDE menu, I chose *Mode: @@ -698,30 +774,38 @@ cursor over it, it'll show information about the battery. Refer to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/LXDE#Network_Management>. Then I read: <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/NetworkManager>. -Install Network Manager:\ +Install Network Manager: + # **pacman -S networkmanager** -You will also want the graphical applet:\ +You will also want the graphical applet: + # pacman -S network-manager-applet Arch wiki says that an autostart rule will be written at */etc/xdg/autostart/nm-applet.desktop* I want to be able to use a VPN at some point, so the wiki tells me to -do:\ +do: + # **pacman -S networkmanager-openvpn** -LXDE uses openbox, so I refer to:\ +LXDE uses openbox, so I refer to: + <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/NetworkManager#Openbox>. -It tells me for the applet I need:\ +It tells me for the applet I need: + # pacman -S xfce4-notifyd gnome-icon-theme -Also, for storing authentication details (wifi) I need:\ +Also, for storing authentication details (wifi) I need: + # **pacman -S gnome-keyring** -I wanted to quickly enable networkmanager:\ +I wanted to quickly enable networkmanager: + # systemctl stop dhcpcd # systemctl start NetworkManager -Enable NetworkManager at boot time:\ +Enable NetworkManager at boot time: + # **systemctl enable NetworkManager** Restart LXDE (log out, and then log back in). @@ -735,7 +819,8 @@ theme, in *lxappearance*. -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_debian.md b/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_debian.md @@ -22,15 +22,24 @@ tampering by someone with physical access to the system. This guide is written for Debian net installer. You can download the ISO from the homepage on [debian.org](https://www.debian.org/). Use this on -the GRUB terminal to boot it from USB (for 64-bit Intel or AMD):\ -**set root='usb0'\ -linux /install.amd/vmlinuz\ -initrd /install.amd/initrd.gz\ -boot\ -** If you are on a 32-bit system (e.g. X60):\ -**set root='usb0'\ -linux /install.386/vmlinuz\ -initrd /install.386/initrd.gz\ +the GRUB terminal to boot it from USB (for 64-bit Intel or AMD): + +**set root='usb0' + +linux /install.amd/vmlinuz + +initrd /install.amd/initrd.gz + +boot + +** If you are on a 32-bit system (e.g. X60): + +**set root='usb0' + +linux /install.386/vmlinuz + +initrd /install.386/initrd.gz + boot** [This guide](grub_boot_installer.html) shows how to create a boot USB @@ -186,11 +195,13 @@ Booting your system At this point, you will have finished the installation. At your GRUB payload, press C to get to the command line. -Do that:\ +Do that: + grub> cryptomount -a grub> set root='lvm/matrix-rootvol' grub> **linux /vmlinuz root=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol -cryptdevice=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol:root**\ +cryptdevice=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol:root** + grub> initrd /initrd.img grub> **boot** @@ -202,7 +213,8 @@ ecryptfs If you didn't encrypt your home directory, then you can safely ignore this section. -Immediately after logging in, do that:\ +Immediately after logging in, do that: + $ **sudo ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase** This will be needed in the future if you ever need to recover your home @@ -225,7 +237,8 @@ Operating System' to say this inside: cryptomount -a set root='lvm/matrix-rootvol' **linux /vmlinuz root=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol -cryptdevice=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol:root**\ +cryptdevice=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol:root** + **initrd /initrd.img** Without specifying a device, the *-a* parameter tries to unlock all @@ -328,7 +341,8 @@ problems. Removing that worked around the issue. -Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md b/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md @@ -70,12 +70,14 @@ article](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Solid_State_Drives). Edit /etc/fstab later on when chrooted into your install. Also, read the whole article and keep all points in mind, adapting them for this guide. -Securely wipe the drive:\ +Securely wipe the drive: + # dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sda; sync NOTE: If you have an SSD, only do this the first time. If it was already LUKS-encrypted before, use the info below to wipe the LUKS header. Also, check online for your SSD what the recommended erase block size is. For -example if it was 2MiB:\ +example if it was 2MiB: + # **dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sda bs=2M; sync** If your drive was already LUKS encrypted (maybe you are re-installing @@ -84,7 +86,8 @@ header. <https://www.lisenet.com/2013/luks-add-keys-backup-and-restore-volume-header/> showed me how to do this. It recommends doing the first 3MiB. Now, that guide is recommending putting zero there. I'm going to use urandom. Do -this:\ +this: + # head -c 3145728 /dev/urandom > /dev/sda; sync (Wiping the LUKS header is important, since it has hashed passphrases and so on. It's 'secure', but 'potentially' a risk). @@ -95,7 +98,8 @@ Change keyboard layout ---------------------- Parabola live shell assumes US Qwerty. If you have something different, -list the available keymaps and use yours:\ +list the available keymaps and use yours: + # localectl list-keymaps # loadkeys LAYOUT For me, LAYOUT would have been dvorak-uk. @@ -124,7 +128,8 @@ dm-mod ------ device-mapper will be used - a lot. Make sure that the kernel module is -loaded:\ +loaded: + # **modprobe dm-mod** Create LUKS partition @@ -138,28 +143,34 @@ prepared cryptsetup command below. Note that the iteration time is for security purposes (mitigates brute force attacks), so anything lower than 5 seconds is probably not ok. -I am using MBR partitioning, so I use cfdisk:\ +I am using MBR partitioning, so I use cfdisk: + # **cfdisk /dev/sda** I create a single large sda1 filling the whole drive, leaving it as the default type 'Linux' (83). Now I refer to -<https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Dm-crypt/Drive_preparation#Partitioning>:\ +<https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Dm-crypt/Drive_preparation#Partitioning>: + I am then directed to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Dm-crypt/Device_encryption>. Parabola forces you to RTFM. Do that. -It tells me to run:\ +It tells me to run: + # **cryptsetup benchmark** (for making sure the list below is -populated)\ -Then:\ +populated) + +Then: + # cat /proc/crypto This gives me crypto options that I can use. It also provides a representation of the best way to set up LUKS (in this case, security is a priority; speed, a distant second). To gain a better understanding, I -am also reading:\ +am also reading: + # **man cryptsetup** Following that page, based on my requirements, I do the following based @@ -168,7 +179,8 @@ on Reading through, it seems like Serpent (encryption) and Whirlpool (hash) is the best option. -I am initializing LUKS with the following:\ +I am initializing LUKS with the following: + # **cryptsetup -v \--cipher serpent-xts-plain64 \--key-size 512 \--hash whirlpool \--iter-time 500 \--use-random \--verify-passphrase luksFormat /dev/sda1** Choose a **secure** passphrase here. Ideally lots of @@ -186,31 +198,40 @@ Create LVM Now I refer to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/LVM>. -Open the LUKS partition:\ +Open the LUKS partition: + # cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda1 lvm (it will be available at /dev/mapper/lvm) -Create LVM partition:\ +Create LVM partition: + # pvcreate /dev/mapper/lvm -Show that you just created it:\ +Show that you just created it: + # **pvdisplay** Now I create the volume group, inside of which the logical volumes will -be created:\ +be created: + # vgcreate matrix /dev/mapper/lvm (volume group name is 'matrix' - choose your own name, if you like) -Show that you created it:\ +Show that you created it: + # **vgdisplay** -Now create the logical volumes:\ +Now create the logical volumes: + # **lvcreate -L 2G matrix -n swapvol** (2G swap partition, named -swapvol)\ +swapvol) + Again, choose your own name if you like. Also, make sure to choose a swap size of your own needs. It basically depends on how much RAM you have installed. I refer to -<http://www.linux.com/news/software/applications/8208-all-about-linux-swap-space>.\ +<http://www.linux.com/news/software/applications/8208-all-about-linux-swap-space>. + # **lvcreate -l +100%FREE matrix -n root** (single large partition in -the rest of the space, named root)\ +the rest of the space, named root) + You can also be flexible here, for example you can specify a /boot, a /, a /home, a /var, a /usr, etc. For example, if you will be running a web/mail server then you want /var in its own partition (so that if it @@ -218,7 +239,8 @@ fills up with logs, it won't crash your system). For a home/laptop system (typical use case), a root and a swap will do (really). Verify that the logical volumes were created, using the following -command:\ +command: + # **lvdisplay** @@ -226,15 +248,19 @@ command:\ Create / and swap partitions, and mount --------------------------------------- -For the swapvol LV I use:\ +For the swapvol LV I use: + # mkswap /dev/mapper/matrix-swapvol -Activate swap:\ +Activate swap: + # **swapon /dev/matrix/swapvol** -For the root LV I use:\ +For the root LV I use: + # **mkfs.btrfs /dev/mapper/matrix-root** -Mount the root (/) partition:\ +Mount the root (/) partition: + # **mount /dev/matrix/root /mnt** @@ -249,7 +275,8 @@ Now I am following the rest of <https://wiki.parabolagnulinux.org/Installation_Guide>. I also cross referenced <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Installation_guide>. -Create /home and /boot on root mountpoint:\ +Create /home and /boot on root mountpoint: + # mkdir -p /mnt/home # **mkdir -p /mnt/boot** @@ -258,50 +285,68 @@ devices are ready to install Parabola. In **/etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist**, comment out all lines except the Server line closest to where you are (I chose the UK Parabola server (main -server)) and then did:\ +server)) and then did: + # pacman -Syy # pacman -Syu # **pacman -Sy pacman** (and then I did the other 2 steps above, -again)\ +again) + In my case I did the steps in the next paragraph, and followed the steps in this paragraph again. -<troubleshooting>\ +<troubleshooting> +    The following is based on 'Verification of package signatures' in -the Parabola install guide.\ -   Check there first to see if steps differ by now.\ +the Parabola install guide. + +   Check there first to see if steps differ by now. +    Now you have to update the default Parabola keyring. This is used for -signing and verifying packages:\ +signing and verifying packages: +     # pacman -Sy parabola-keyring    It says that if you get GPG errors, then it's probably an expired -key and, therefore, you should do:\ +key and, therefore, you should do: +     # pacman-key \--populate parabola     # pacman-key \--refresh-keys     # pacman -Sy parabola-keyring    To be honest, you should do the above anyway. Parabola has a lot of -maintainers, and a lot of keys. Really!\ -   If you get an error mentioning dirmngr, do:\ +maintainers, and a lot of keys. Really! + +   If you get an error mentioning dirmngr, do: +     # dirmngr </dev/null    Also, it says that if the clock is set incorrectly then you have to -manually set the correct time\ -   (if keys are listed as expired because of it):\ +manually set the correct time + +   (if keys are listed as expired because of it): +     # date MMDDhhmm\[\[CC\]YY\]\[.ss\] -   I also had to install:\ +   I also had to install: +     # pacman -S archlinux-keyring     # pacman-key \--populate archlinux    In my case I saw some conflicting files reported in pacman, stopping -me from using it.\ +me from using it. +    I deleted the files that it mentioned and then it worked. -Specifically, I had this error:\ -   *licenses: /usr/share/licenses/common/MPS exists in filesystem*\ +Specifically, I had this error: + +   *licenses: /usr/share/licenses/common/MPS exists in filesystem* +    I rm -Rf'd the file and then pacman worked. I'm told that the -following would have also made it work:\ +following would have also made it work: +     # pacman -Sf licenses -</troubleshooting>\ +</troubleshooting> + I also like to install other packages (base-devel, compilers and so on) and wpa\_supplicant/dialog/iw/wpa\_actiond are needed for wireless after -the install:\ +the install: + # **pacstrap /mnt base base-devel wpa\_supplicant dialog iw wpa\_actiond** @@ -312,21 +357,26 @@ Configure the system Generate an fstab - UUIDs are used because they have certain advantages (see <https://wiki.parabola.nu/Fstab#Identifying_filesystems>. If you -prefer labels instead, replace the -U option with -L):\ +prefer labels instead, replace the -U option with -L): + # genfstab -U -p /mnt >> /mnt/etc/fstab -Check the created file:\ +Check the created file: + # cat /mnt/etc/fstab (If there are any errors, edit the file. Do **NOT** run the genfstab command again!) -Chroot into new system:\ +Chroot into new system: + # **arch-chroot /mnt /bin/bash** -It's a good idea to have this installed:\ +It's a good idea to have this installed: + # **pacman -S linux-libre-lts** It was also suggested that you should install this kernel (read up on -what GRSEC is):\ +what GRSEC is): + # **pacman -S linux-libre-grsec** This is another kernel that sits inside /boot, which you can use. LTS @@ -334,35 +384,43 @@ means 'long-term support'. These are so-called 'stable' kernels that can be used as a fallback during updates, if a bad kernel causes issues for you. -Parabola does not have wget. This is sinister. Install it:\ +Parabola does not have wget. This is sinister. Install it: + # **pacman -S wget** -Locale:\ +Locale: + # vi /etc/locale.gen Uncomment your needed localisations. For example en\_GB.UTF-8 (UTF-8 is -highly recommended over other options).\ +highly recommended over other options). + # locale-gen # echo LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8 > /etc/locale.conf # **export LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8** -Console font and keymap:\ +Console font and keymap: + # vi /etc/vconsole.conf In my case: KEYMAP=dvorak-uk FONT=lat9w-16 -Time zone:\ +Time zone: + # ln -s /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/London /etc/localtime (Replace Zone and Subzone to your liking. See /usr/share/zoneinfo) -Hardware clock:\ +Hardware clock: + # **hwclock \--systohc \--utc** Hostname: Write your hostname to /etc/hostname. For example, if your -hostname is parabola:\ +hostname is parabola: + # echo parabola > /etc/hostname -Add the same hostname to /etc/hosts:\ +Add the same hostname to /etc/hosts: + # vi /etc/hosts #<ip-address> <hostname.domain.org> <hostname> @@ -376,7 +434,8 @@ Mkinitcpio: Configure /etc/mkinitcpio.conf as needed (see <https://wiki.parabola.nu/Mkinitcpio>). Runtime modules can be found in /usr/lib/initcpio/hooks, and build hooks can be found in /usr/lib/initcpio/install. (# **mkinitcpio -H hookname** gives -information about each hook.) Specifically, for this use case:\ +information about each hook.) Specifically, for this use case: + # vi /etc/mkinitcpio.conf Then modify the file like so: @@ -401,18 +460,23 @@ Then modify the file like so: Now using mkinitcpio, you can create the kernel and ramdisk for booting with (this is different from Arch, specifying linux-libre instead of -linux):\ +linux): + # mkinitcpio -p linux-libre -Also do it for linux-libre-lts:\ +Also do it for linux-libre-lts: + # mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-lts -Also do it for linux-libre-grsec:\ +Also do it for linux-libre-grsec: + # **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-grsec** Set the root password: At the time of writing, Parabola used SHA512 by default for its password hashing. I referred to -<https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/SHA_password_hashes>.\ +<https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/SHA_password_hashes>. + # vi /etc/pam.d/passwd -Add rounds=65536 at the end of the uncommented 'password' line.\ +Add rounds=65536 at the end of the uncommented 'password' line. + # passwd root Make sure to set a secure password! Also, it must never be the same as your LUKS password. @@ -427,17 +491,24 @@ Extra security tweaks Based on <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Security>. -Restrict access to important directories:\ +Restrict access to important directories: + # **chmod 700 /boot /etc/{iptables,arptables}** -Lockout user after three failed login attempts:\ -Edit the file /etc/pam.d/system-login and comment out that line:\ -*# auth required pam\_tally.so onerr=succeed file=/var/log/faillog*\ -Or just delete it. Above it, put:\ +Lockout user after three failed login attempts: + +Edit the file /etc/pam.d/system-login and comment out that line: + +*# auth required pam\_tally.so onerr=succeed file=/var/log/faillog* + +Or just delete it. Above it, put: + *auth required pam\_tally.so deny=2 unlock\_time=600 onerr=succeed -file=/var/log/faillog*\ +file=/var/log/faillog* + To unlock a user manually (if a password attempt is failed 3 times), -do:\ +do: + # **pam\_tally \--user *theusername* \--reset** What the above configuration does is lock the user out for 10 minutes, if they make 3 failed login attempts. @@ -451,18 +522,22 @@ don't really need sudo. Unmount, reboot! ---------------- -Exit from chroot:\ +Exit from chroot: + # **exit** -unmount:\ +unmount: + # umount -R /mnt # **swapoff -a** -deactivate the lvm lv's:\ +deactivate the lvm lv's: + # lvchange -an /dev/matrix/root # lvchange -an /dev/matrix/swapvol -Lock the encrypted partition (close it):\ +Lock the encrypted partition (close it): + # **cryptsetup luksClose lvm** # shutdown -h now @@ -480,7 +555,8 @@ underlines will boot lts kernel instead of normal). grub> cryptomount -a grub> set root='lvm/matrix-root' grub> **linux /boot/vmlinuz-linux-libre-lts root=/dev/matrix/root -cryptdevice=/dev/sda1:root**\ +cryptdevice=/dev/sda1:root** + grub> initrd /boot/initramfs-linux-libre-lts.img grub> boot @@ -520,16 +596,21 @@ possibility of bricking your device! I will go for the re-flash option here. Firstly, cd to the libreboot\_util/cbfstool/{armv7l i686 x86\_64} directory. Dump the current firmware - where *libreboot.rom* is an example: make sure to -adapt:\ +adapt: + # flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom If flashrom complains about multiple flash chips detected, add a *-c* -option at the end, with the name of your chosen chip is quotes.\ +option at the end, with the name of your chosen chip is quotes. + You can check if everything is in there (*grub.cfg* and *grubtest.cfg* -would be really nice):\ +would be really nice): + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom print -Extract grubtest.cfg:\ +Extract grubtest.cfg: + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg -And modify:\ +And modify: + $ **vi grubtest.cfg** In grubtest.cfg, inside the 'Load Operating System' menu entry, change @@ -558,18 +639,23 @@ detected LUKS volumes. You can also specify -u UUID or -a (device). hardening your GRUB configuration, for security purposes. Save your changes in grubtest.cfg, then delete the unmodified config -from the ROM image:\ +from the ROM image: + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grubtest.cfg -and insert the modified grubtest.cfg:\ +and insert the modified grubtest.cfg: + $ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg -t -raw**\ +raw** + Now refer to <http://libreboot.org/docs/install/#flashrom>. Cd (up) to -the libreboot\_util directory and update the flash chip contents:\ +the libreboot\_util directory and update the flash chip contents: + # ./flash update libreboot.rom Ocassionally, coreboot changes the name of a given board. If flashrom complains about a board mismatch, but you are sure that you chose the -correct ROM image, then run this alternative command:\ +correct ROM image, then run this alternative command: + # ./flash forceupdate libreboot.rom You should see "Verifying flash... VERIFIED." written at the end of the flashrom output. @@ -596,25 +682,31 @@ the main config still links (in the menu) to grubtest.cfg, so that you don't have to manually switch to it, in case you ever want to follow this guide again in the future (modifying the already modified config). Inside libreboot\_util/cbfstool/{armv7l i686 x86\_64}, we can do this -with the following command:\ +with the following command: + $ **sed -e 's:(cbfsdisk)/grub.cfg:(cbfsdisk)/grubtest.cfg:g' -e 's:Switch to grub.cfg:Switch to grubtest.cfg:g' < grubtest.cfg > -grub.cfg**\ -Delete the grub.cfg that remained inside the ROM:\ +grub.cfg** + +Delete the grub.cfg that remained inside the ROM: + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grub.cfg -Add the modified version that you just made:\ +Add the modified version that you just made: + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grub.cfg -f grub.cfg -t raw Now you have a modified ROM. Once more, refer to <http://libreboot.org/docs/install/#flashrom>. Cd to the libreboot\_util -directory and update the flash chip contents:\ +directory and update the flash chip contents: + # ./flash update libreboot.rom And wait for the "Verifying flash... VERIFIED." Once you have done that, shut down and then boot up with your new configuration. When done, delete GRUB (remember, we only needed it for the *grub-mkpasswd-pbkdf2* utility; GRUB is already part of libreboot, -flashed alongside it as a *payload*):\ +flashed alongside it as a *payload*): + # **pacman -R grub** @@ -635,23 +727,31 @@ fact that it is being loaded from an encrypted volume. Therefore, you will be asked to enter your passphrase a second time. A workaround is to put a keyfile inside initramfs, with instructions for the kernel to use it when booting. This is safe, because /boot/ is encrypted (otherwise, -putting a keyfile inside initramfs would be a bad idea).\ -Boot up and login as root or your user. Then generate the key file:\ +putting a keyfile inside initramfs would be a bad idea). + +Boot up and login as root or your user. Then generate the key file: + # **dd bs=512 count=4 if=/dev/urandom of=/etc/mykeyfile -iflag=fullblock**\ -Insert it into the luks volume:\ +iflag=fullblock** + +Insert it into the luks volume: + # cryptsetup luksAddKey /dev/sdX /etc/mykeyfile and enter your LUKS passphrase when prompted. Add the keyfile to the -initramfs by adding it to FILES in /etc/mkinitcpio.conf. For example:\ +initramfs by adding it to FILES in /etc/mkinitcpio.conf. For example: + # FILES="/etc/mykeyfile" -Create the initramfs image from scratch:\ +Create the initramfs image from scratch: + # mkinitcpio -p linux-libre # mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-lts # mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-grsec Add the following to your grub.cfg - you are now able to do that, see -above! -, or add it in the kernel command line for GRUB:\ +above! -, or add it in the kernel command line for GRUB: + # cryptkey=rootfs:/etc/mykeyfile -\ + + You can also place this inside the grub.cfg that exists in CBFS: [grub\_cbfs.html](grub_cbfs.html). @@ -660,7 +760,8 @@ You can also place this inside the grub.cfg that exists in CBFS: Further security tips --------------------- -<https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Security>.\ +<https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Security>. + <https://wiki.parabolagnulinux.org/User:GNUtoo/laptop> @@ -755,8 +856,10 @@ problems. Removing that worked around the issue. -Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ -Copyright © 2015 Jeroen Quint <jezza@diplomail.ch>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + +Copyright © 2015 Jeroen Quint <jezza@diplomail.ch> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/grub_boot_installer.md b/docs/gnulinux/grub_boot_installer.md @@ -30,18 +30,22 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in GNU+Linux) If you downloaded your ISO on an existing GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable GNU+Linux USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + $ dmesg -Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ +Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is: + $ lsblk Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ +example: + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX* # umount /dev/sdX* dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your -distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ +distro ISO to it with dd. For example: + $ sudo dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync # dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync @@ -72,17 +76,21 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in LibertyBSD or OpenBSD) If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or OpenBSD system, here is how to create the bootable GNU+Linux USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + $ dmesg | tail -Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ +Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3: + $ disklabel sd3 Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ +example: + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the -OpenBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ +OpenBSD installer to it with dd. For example: + $ doas dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. @@ -108,16 +116,26 @@ Debian or Devuan net install? Download the Debian or Devuan net installer. You can download the ISO from the homepage on [debian.org](https://www.debian.org/), or [the Devuan homepage](https://www.devuan.org/) for Devuan. Use this on the -GRUB terminal to boot it from USB (for 64-bit Intel or AMD):\ -**set root='usb0'\ -linux /install.amd/vmlinuz\ -initrd /install.amd/initrd.gz\ -boot\ -** If you are on a 32-bit system (e.g. X60):\ -**set root='usb0'\ -linux /install.386/vmlinuz\ -initrd /install.386/initrd.gz\ -boot**\ +GRUB terminal to boot it from USB (for 64-bit Intel or AMD): + +**set root='usb0' + +linux /install.amd/vmlinuz + +initrd /install.amd/initrd.gz + +boot + +** If you are on a 32-bit system (e.g. X60): + +**set root='usb0' + +linux /install.386/vmlinuz + +initrd /install.386/initrd.gz + +boot** + We recommend using the *MATE* desktop. @@ -142,13 +160,17 @@ distribution. You must adapt them appropriately, for whatever GNU+Linux distribution it is that you are trying to install.* If the ISOLINUX parser or *Search for GRUB configuration* options won't -work, then press C in GRUB to access the command line.\ +work, then press C in GRUB to access the command line. + grub> ls -Get the device from above output, eg (usb0). Example:\ +Get the device from above output, eg (usb0). Example: + grub> cat (usb0)/isolinux/isolinux.cfg Either this will show the ISOLINUX menuentries for that ISO, or link to -other .cfg files, for example /isolinux/foo.cfg.\ -If it did that, then you do:\ +other .cfg files, for example /isolinux/foo.cfg. + +If it did that, then you do: + grub> cat (usb0)/isolinux/foo.cfg And so on, until you find the correct menuentries for ISOLINUX. **The file */isolinux/foo.cfg* is a fictional example. Do not actually use @@ -165,11 +187,15 @@ options in txt.cfg. This is important if you want 64-bit booting on your system. Devuan versions based on Debian 8.x may also have the same issue. -Now look at the ISOLINUX menuentry. It'll look like:\ -**kernel /path/to/kernel\ -append PARAMETERS initrd=/path/to/initrd MAYBE\_MORE\_PARAMETERS\ +Now look at the ISOLINUX menuentry. It'll look like: + +**kernel /path/to/kernel + +append PARAMETERS initrd=/path/to/initrd MAYBE\_MORE\_PARAMETERS + ** GRUB works the same way, but in it's own way. Example GRUB -commands:\ +commands: + grub> set root='usb0' grub> linux /path/to/kernel PARAMETERS MAYBE\_MORE\_PARAMETERS grub> initrd /path/to/initrd @@ -207,7 +233,8 @@ When using the ROM images that use coreboot's "text mode" instead of the coreboot framebuffer, booting the Debian or Devuan net installer results in graphical corruption because it is trying to switch to a framebuffer which doesn't exist. Use that kernel parameter on the -'linux' line when booting it:\ +'linux' line when booting it: + **vga=normal fb=false** This forces debian-installer to start in text-mode, instead of trying to @@ -225,8 +252,10 @@ debian-installer (text mode) net install method. -Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ -Copyright © 2016 Scott Bonds <scott@ggr.com>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + +Copyright © 2016 Scott Bonds <scott@ggr.com> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md b/docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md @@ -50,7 +50,8 @@ Table of Contents Introduction ------------ -Download the latest release from <http://libreboot.org/>\ +Download the latest release from <http://libreboot.org/> + **If you downloaded from git, refer to [../git/#build\_meta](../git/#build_meta) before continuing.** @@ -124,7 +125,8 @@ Acquire the necessary utilities {#tools} Use ***cbfstool*** and ***flashrom***. There are available in the *libreboot\_util* release archive, or they can be compiled (see [../git/#build\_flashrom](../git/#build_flashrom)). Flashrom is also -available from the repositories:\ +available from the repositories: + # **pacman -S flashrom** [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -140,11 +142,13 @@ flashed. For the purpose of this tutorial it is assumed that your ROM image file is named *libreboot.rom*, so please make sure to adapt. ROM images are included pre-compiled in libreboot. You can also dump -your current firmware, using flashrom:\ +your current firmware, using flashrom: + $ sudo flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom # flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom If you are told to specify the chip, add the option **-c {your chip}** -to the command, for example:\ +to the command, for example: + # **flashrom -c MX25L6405 -p internal -r libreboot.rom** [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -154,7 +158,8 @@ to the command, for example:\ Extract grubtest.cfg from the ROM image {#extract_testconfig} --------------------------------------- -You can check the contents of the ROM image, inside CBFS:\ +You can check the contents of the ROM image, inside CBFS: + $ cd .../libreboot\_util/cbfstool** $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom print** @@ -163,7 +168,8 @@ loaded by default, with a menuentry for switching to grubtest.cfg. In this tutorial, you will first modify and test *grubtest.cfg*. This is to reduce the possibility of bricking your device, so DO NOT SKIP THIS! -Extract grubtest.cfg from the ROM image:\ +Extract grubtest.cfg from the ROM image: + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg Modify the grubtest.cfg accordingly. @@ -176,10 +182,12 @@ Re-insert the modified grubtest.cfg into the ROM image {#reinsert_modified_testc ------------------------------------------------------ Once your grubtest.cfg is modified and saved, delete the unmodified -config from the ROM image:\ +config from the ROM image: + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grubtest.cfg -Next, insert the modified version:\ +Next, insert the modified version: + **$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg -t raw** @@ -192,11 +200,13 @@ Testing **Now you have a modified ROM. Refer back to [../install/#flashrom](../install/#flashrom) for information on how to -flash it.\ +flash it. + $ cd /libreboot\_util** # **./flash update libreboot.rom Ocassionally, coreboot changes the name of a given board. If flashrom complains about a board mismatch, but you are sure that you chose the -correct ROM image, then run this alternative command:\ +correct ROM image, then run this alternative command: + # ./flash forceupdate libreboot.rom You should see **"Verifying flash... VERIFIED."** written at the end of the flashrom output. Once you have done that, shut down and then boot @@ -224,15 +234,19 @@ difference: the menuentry 'Switch to grub.cfg' will be changed to grubtest.cfg. This is so that the main config still links (in the menu) to grubtest.cfg, so that you don't have to manually switch to it, in case you ever want to follow this guide again in the future (modifying -the already modified config). From /libreboot\_util/cbfstool, do:\ +the already modified config). From /libreboot\_util/cbfstool, do: + $ **sed -e 's:(cbfsdisk)/grub.cfg:(cbfsdisk)/grubtest.cfg:g' -e 's:Switch to grub.cfg:Switch to grubtest.cfg:g' < grubtest.cfg > -grub.cfg**\ +grub.cfg** + + +Delete the grub.cfg that remained inside the ROM: -Delete the grub.cfg that remained inside the ROM:\ $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grub.cfg -Add the modified version that you just made:\ +Add the modified version that you just made: + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grub.cfg -f grub.cfg -t raw **Now you have a modified ROM. Again, refer back to @@ -244,8 +258,10 @@ boot up with your new configuration.** -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ -Copyright © 2015 Jeroen Quint <jezza@diplomail.ch>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + +Copyright © 2015 Jeroen Quint <jezza@diplomail.ch> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/grub_hardening.md b/docs/gnulinux/grub_hardening.md @@ -188,7 +188,8 @@ What remains now is to include the modifications into the image (rom): -Copyright © 2017 Fedja Beader <fedja@protonmail.ch>\ +Copyright © 2017 Fedja Beader <fedja@protonmail.ch> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/index.md b/docs/gnulinux/index.md @@ -25,7 +25,8 @@ instructions have yet to be written.** -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/grub/index.md b/docs/grub/index.md @@ -19,7 +19,8 @@ Changing the background image in GRUB {#grub_background} Use cbfstool from libreboot\_util, or libreboot\_src/coreboot/util/cbfstool/ if you want to build from source. -./cbfstool yourrom.rom remove background.png -n background.png\ +./cbfstool yourrom.rom remove background.png -n background.png + ./cbfstool yourrom.rom add -f background.png -n background.png -t raw When you've done this, re-flash your ROM and you should have a new @@ -48,20 +49,25 @@ This is a free font that is also contained in GNU+Linux distributions like Debian, Devuan or Parabola. $ cd libreboot\_src/grub -compile grub (the build scripts info on how to do this)\ -come back out into libreboot\_src/resources/grub:\ +compile grub (the build scripts info on how to do this) + +come back out into libreboot\_src/resources/grub: + $ cd ../libreboot\_src/resources/grub/font I took Dejavu Sans Mono from dejavu (included in this version of -libreboot) and did:\ +libreboot) and did: + **$ ../../../grub/grub-mkfont -o dejavusansmono.pf2 dejavu-fonts-ttf-2.34/ttf/DejaVuSansMono.ttf** I then added the instructions to 'gen.sh' script in grub-assemble to include resources/grub/dejavusansmono.pf2 in all of the ROM images, at -the root of the GRUB memdisk.\ +the root of the GRUB memdisk. + I then added that instructions to the grub.cfg files (to load the -font):\ +font): + **loadfont (memdisk)/dejavusansmono.pf2** @@ -76,10 +82,13 @@ Custom keyboard layout in GRUB (for reference) {#grub_custom_keyboard} Keymaps are stored in resources/utilities/grub-assemble/keymap/. -Example (French Azerty):\ +Example (French Azerty): + $ ckbcomp fr > frazerty -\ -Go in grub directory:\ + + +Go in grub directory: + **cat frazerty | ./grub/grub-mklayout -o frazerty.gkb** You must make sure that the files are named keymap and keymap.gkb (where @@ -110,7 +119,8 @@ file was created -Copyright © 2014 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hardware/dock.md b/docs/hardware/dock.md @@ -123,7 +123,8 @@ Notes about DMA and the docking station (X60/T60) -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hardware/index.md b/docs/hardware/index.md @@ -18,7 +18,8 @@ This section relates to hardware maintenance on supported targets. -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hardware/t60_heatsink.md b/docs/hardware/t60_heatsink.md @@ -28,21 +28,26 @@ Software requirements {#software_requirements} Disassembly {#recovery} =========== -Remove those screws and remove the HDD:\ +Remove those screws and remove the HDD: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0001.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0002.JPG) -Lift off the palm rest:\ +Lift off the palm rest: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0003.JPG) Lift up the keyboard, pull it back a bit, flip it over like that and -then disconnect it from the board:\ +then disconnect it from the board: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0004.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0005.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0006.JPG) -Gently wedge both sides loose:\ +Gently wedge both sides loose: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0007.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0008.JPG) -Remove that cable from the position:\ +Remove that cable from the position: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0009.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0010.JPG) Remove the bezel (sorry forgot to take pics). @@ -50,7 +55,8 @@ Remove the bezel (sorry forgot to take pics). On the CPU (and there is another chip south-east to it, sorry forgot to take pic) clean off the old thermal paste (with the alcohol) and apply new (Artic Silver 5 is good, others are good too) you should also clean -the heatsink the same way\ +the heatsink the same way + ![](../images/t60_dev/0051.JPG) This is also an opportunity to change the CPU to another one. For @@ -59,33 +65,41 @@ processor (higher speed, 64-bit support). A Core 2 Duo T7600 was installed here. Attach the heatsink and install the screws (also, make sure to install -the AC jack as highlighted):\ +the AC jack as highlighted): + ![](../images/t60_dev/0052.JPG) -Reinstall that upper bezel:\ +Reinstall that upper bezel: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0053.JPG) -Do that:\ +Do that: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0054.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0055.JPG) -Attach keyboard:\ +Attach keyboard: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0056.JPG) Place keyboard and (sorry, forgot to take pics) reinstall the palmrest -and insert screws on the underside:\ +and insert screws on the underside: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0058.JPG) -It lives!\ +It lives! + ![](../images/t60_dev/0071.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0072.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0073.JPG) Always stress test ('stress -c 2' and xsensors. below 90C is ok) when -replacing cpu paste/heatsink:\ +replacing cpu paste/heatsink: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0074.JPG) -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hardware/t60_lcd_15.md b/docs/hardware/t60_lcd_15.md @@ -13,44 +13,53 @@ the procedure is a bit more involved than on 15.1". Disassembly {#recovery} =========== -Remove those covers and unscrew:\ +Remove those covers and unscrew: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0059.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0060.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0061.JPG) Gently pry off the front bezel. -Remove inverter board:\ +Remove inverter board: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0064.JPG) -Disconnect LCD cable:\ +Disconnect LCD cable: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0065.JPG) -Remove the panel:\ +Remove the panel: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0066.JPG) Move the rails (left and right side) from the old panel to the new one -and then attach LCD cable:\ +and then attach LCD cable: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0068.JPG) Insert panel (this one is an LG-Philips LP150E05-A2K1, and there are others. See -[../hcl/#supported\_t60\_list](../hcl/#supported_t60_list)):\ +[../hcl/#supported\_t60\_list](../hcl/#supported_t60_list)): + ![](../images/t60_dev/0069.JPG) Insert new inverter board (see [../hcl/#supported\_t60\_list](../hcl/#supported_t60_list) for what is -recommended on your LCD panel):\ +recommended on your LCD panel): + ![](../images/t60_dev/0070.JPG) Now re-attach the front bezel and put all the screws in. -It lives!\ +It lives! + ![](../images/t60_dev/0071.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0072.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0073.JPG) -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hardware/t60_security.md b/docs/hardware/t60_security.md @@ -48,28 +48,36 @@ purely theoretical for the time being. Disassembly {#procedure} =========== -Remove those screws and remove the HDD:\ +Remove those screws and remove the HDD: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0001.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0002.JPG) -Lift off the palm rest:\ +Lift off the palm rest: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0003.JPG) Lift up the keyboard, pull it back a bit, flip it over like that and -then disconnect it from the board:\ +then disconnect it from the board: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0004.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0005.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0006.JPG) -Gently wedge both sides loose:\ +Gently wedge both sides loose: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0007.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0008.JPG) -Remove that cable from the position:\ +Remove that cable from the position: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0009.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0010.JPG) Now remove that bezel. Remove wifi, nvram battery and speaker connector -(also remove 56k modem, on the left of wifi):\ -![](../images/t60_dev/0011.JPG)\ +(also remove 56k modem, on the left of wifi): + +![](../images/t60_dev/0011.JPG) + Reason: has direct (and very fast) memory access, and could -(theoretically) leak data over a side-channel.\ +(theoretically) leak data over a side-channel. + **Wifi:** The ath5k/ath9k cards might not have firmware at all. They might safe but could have access to the computer's RAM trough DMA. If people have an intel card(most T60 laptops come with Intel wifi by @@ -77,41 +85,53 @@ default, until you change it),then that card runs a non-free firwamre and has access to the computer's RAM trough DMA! So the risk-level is very high. -Remove those screws:\ +Remove those screws: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0012.JPG) -Disconnect the power jack:\ +Disconnect the power jack: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0013.JPG) -Remove nvram battery (we will put it back later):\ +Remove nvram battery (we will put it back later): + ![](../images/t60_dev/0014.JPG) -Disconnect cable (for 56k modem) and disconnect the other cable:\ +Disconnect cable (for 56k modem) and disconnect the other cable: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0015.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0016.JPG) -Disconnect speaker cable:\ +Disconnect speaker cable: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0017.JPG) -Disconnect the other end of the 56k modem cable:\ +Disconnect the other end of the 56k modem cable: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0018.JPG) -Make sure you removed it:\ +Make sure you removed it: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0019.JPG) -Unscrew those:\ +Unscrew those: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0020.JPG) -Make sure you removed those:\ +Make sure you removed those: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0021.JPG) -Disconnect LCD cable from board:\ +Disconnect LCD cable from board: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0022.JPG) -Remove those screws then remove the LCD assembly:\ +Remove those screws then remove the LCD assembly: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0023.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0024.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0025.JPG) -Once again, make sure you removed those:\ +Once again, make sure you removed those: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0026.JPG) Remove the shielding containing the motherboard, then flip it over. @@ -119,14 +139,17 @@ Remove these screws, placing them on a steady surface in the same layout as they were in before you removed them. Also, you should mark each screw hole after removing the screw (a permanent marker pen will do), this is so that you have a point of reference when re-assembling the -system:\ +system: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0027.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0028.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0029.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0031.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0032.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0033.JPG) Remove microphone (soldering iron not needed. Just wedge it out -gently):\ -![](../images/t60_dev/0039.JPG)\ +gently): + +![](../images/t60_dev/0039.JPG) + Rationale: Another reason to remove the microphone: If your computer gets[\[1\]](#ref1) compromised, it can record what you say, and use it @@ -136,93 +159,118 @@ could theoretically be programmed to accept remote commands from some speaker somewhere (remote security hole). **In other words, the system could already be compromised from the factory.** -Remove infrared:\ +Remove infrared: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0040.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0042.JPG) Remove cardbus (it's in a socket, no need to disable. Just remove the -port itself):\ -![](../images/t60_dev/0041.JPG)\ +port itself): + +![](../images/t60_dev/0041.JPG) + Rationale: It has direct memory access and can be used to extract sensitive details (such as LUKS keys). See 'GoodBIOS' video linked at the end (speaker is Peter Stuge, a coreboot hacker). The video covers X60 but the same topics apply to T60. -Before re-installing the upper chassis, remove the speaker:\ -![](../images/t60_dev/0043.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0044.JPG)\ +Before re-installing the upper chassis, remove the speaker: + +![](../images/t60_dev/0043.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0044.JPG) + Reason: combined with the microphone issue, this could be used to leak -data.\ +data. + If your computer gets[\[1\]](#ref1) compromised, it can be used to transmit data to nearby compromised devices. It's unknown if it can be -turned into a microphone[\[2\]](#ref2).\ +turned into a microphone[\[2\]](#ref2). + Replacement: headphones/speakers (line-out) or external DAC (USB). -Remove the wwan:\ -![](../images/t60_dev/0045.JPG)\ +Remove the wwan: + +![](../images/t60_dev/0045.JPG) + **Wwan (3g modem):** They run proprietary software! It's like AMT but -over the GSM network which is probably even worse.\ +over the GSM network which is probably even worse. + Replacement: external USB wifi dongle. (or USB wwan/3g dongle; note, this has all the same privacy issues as mobile phones. wwan not recommended). This is where the simcard connector is soldered. See notes above about wwan. Remove simcard by removing battery and then it's accessible (so, -remember to do this when you re-assemble. or you could do it now?)\ +remember to do this when you re-assemble. or you could do it now?) + ![](../images/t60_dev/0046.JPG) -Put those screws back:\ +Put those screws back: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0047.JPG) -Put it back into lower chassis:\ +Put it back into lower chassis: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0048.JPG) -Attach LCD and insert screws (also, attach the lcd cable to the board):\ +Attach LCD and insert screws (also, attach the lcd cable to the board): + ![](../images/t60_dev/0049.JPG) -Insert those screws:\ +Insert those screws: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0050.JPG) On the CPU (and there is another chip south-east to it, sorry forgot to take pic) clean off the old thermal paste (with the alcohol) and apply new (Artic Silver 5 is good, others are good too) you should also clean -the heatsink the same way\ +the heatsink the same way + ![](../images/t60_dev/0051.JPG) Attach the heatsink and install the screws (also, make sure to install -the AC jack as highlighted):\ +the AC jack as highlighted): + ![](../images/t60_dev/0052.JPG) -Reinstall that upper bezel:\ +Reinstall that upper bezel: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0053.JPG) -Do that:\ +Do that: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0054.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0055.JPG) -Attach keyboard and install nvram battery:\ +Attach keyboard and install nvram battery: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0056.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0057.JPG) Place keyboard and (sorry, forgot to take pics) reinstall the palmrest -and insert screws on the underside:\ +and insert screws on the underside: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0058.JPG) -Remove those covers and unscrew:\ +Remove those covers and unscrew: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0059.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0060.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0061.JPG) Gently pry off the front bezel (sorry, forgot to take pics). -Remove bluetooth module:\ +Remove bluetooth module: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0062.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0063.JPG) Re-attach the front bezel and re-insert the screws (sorry, forgot to take pics). -It lives!\ +It lives! + ![](../images/t60_dev/0071.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0072.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0073.JPG) Always stress test ('stress -c 2' and xsensors. below 90C is ok) when -replacing cpu paste/heatsink:\ +replacing cpu paste/heatsink: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0074.JPG) @@ -250,7 +298,8 @@ half of the video to see how to do the above. Also not covered yet: --------------------- -- Intrusion detection: randomized seal on screws\ +- Intrusion detection: randomized seal on screws + Just put nail polish with lot of glider on the important screws, take some good pictures. Keep the pictueres and make sure of their integrity. Compare the nail polish with the pictures before powering @@ -352,7 +401,8 @@ transport), the spies probably already have that since a long time. -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hardware/x60_heatsink.md b/docs/hardware/x60_heatsink.md @@ -39,62 +39,79 @@ Software requirements (for CPU stress testing) {#software_requirements} Disassembly {#procedure} =========== -Remove those screws:\ +Remove those screws: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0000.jpg) -Push the keyboard forward (carefully):\ +Push the keyboard forward (carefully): + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0001.jpg) -Lift the keyboard up and disconnect it from the board:\ +Lift the keyboard up and disconnect it from the board: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0002.jpg) Grab the right-hand side of the chassis and force it off (gently) and -pry up the rest of the chassis:\ +pry up the rest of the chassis: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0003.jpg) -You should now have this:\ +You should now have this: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0004.jpg) -Disconnect the wifi antenna cables, the modem cable and the speaker:\ +Disconnect the wifi antenna cables, the modem cable and the speaker: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0005.jpg) Unroute the cables along their path, carefully lifting the tape that holds them in place. Then, disconnect the modem cable (other end) and power connection and unroute all the cables so that they dangle by the -monitor hinge on the right-hand side:\ +monitor hinge on the right-hand side: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0006.jpg) Disconnect the monitor from the motherboard, and unroute the grey -antenna cable, carefully lifting the tape that holds it into place:\ +antenna cable, carefully lifting the tape that holds it into place: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0008.jpg) Carefully lift the remaining tape and unroute the left antenna cable so -that it is loose:\ +that it is loose: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0009.jpg) -Remove those screws:\ +Remove those screws: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0011.jpg) -Remove those screws:\ +Remove those screws: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0012.jpg) -Carefully remove the plate, like so:\ +Carefully remove the plate, like so: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0013.jpg) -Remove the SATA connector:\ +Remove the SATA connector: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0014.jpg) -Now remove the motherboard (gently) and cast the lcd/chassis aside:\ +Now remove the motherboard (gently) and cast the lcd/chassis aside: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0015.jpg) -Look at that black tape above the heatsink, remove it:\ +Look at that black tape above the heatsink, remove it: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0016.jpg) -Now you have removed it:\ +Now you have removed it: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0017.jpg) Disconnect the fan and remove all the screws, heatsink will easily come -off:\ +off: + ![](../images/x60_heatsink/0018.jpg) Remove the old paste with a cloth (from the CPU and heatsink) and then @@ -109,7 +126,8 @@ Below 90C is ok. -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hardware/x60_keyboard.md b/docs/hardware/x60_keyboard.md @@ -16,15 +16,20 @@ same place, and it's the same procedure. Just follow these steps, and then reverse {#recovery} ========================================= -![](../images/x60_keyboard/1.JPG)\ -![](../images/x60_keyboard/2.JPG)\ -![](../images/x60_keyboard/3.JPG)\ -![](../images/x60_keyboard/4.JPG)\ +![](../images/x60_keyboard/1.JPG) + +![](../images/x60_keyboard/2.JPG) + +![](../images/x60_keyboard/3.JPG) + +![](../images/x60_keyboard/4.JPG) + ![](../images/x60_keyboard/5.JPG) -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hardware/x60_lcd_change.md b/docs/hardware/x60_lcd_change.md @@ -18,7 +18,8 @@ This tutorial is incomplete, and only pictures for now. -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hardware/x60_security.md b/docs/hardware/x60_security.md @@ -47,42 +47,59 @@ purely theoretical for the time being. Disassembly {#procedure} =========== -Firstly remove the bluetooth (if your X60 has this):\ +Firstly remove the bluetooth (if your X60 has this): + The marked screws are underneath those stickers (marked in those 3 -locations at the bottom of the LCD assembly):\ -![](../images/x60_security/0000_bluetooth0.jpg)\ +locations at the bottom of the LCD assembly): + +![](../images/x60_security/0000_bluetooth0.jpg) + Now gently pry off the bottom part of the front bezel, and the bluetooth -module is on the left (easily removable):\ -![](../images/x60_security/0000_bluetooth.jpg)\ - -If your model was WWAN, remove the simcard (check anyway):\ -Uncover those 2 screws at the bottom:\ -![](../images/x60_security/0000_simcard0.jpg)\ -SIM card (not present in the picture) is in the marked location:\ -![](../images/x60_security/0000_simcard1.jpg)\ +module is on the left (easily removable): + +![](../images/x60_security/0000_bluetooth.jpg) + + +If your model was WWAN, remove the simcard (check anyway): + +Uncover those 2 screws at the bottom: + +![](../images/x60_security/0000_simcard0.jpg) + +SIM card (not present in the picture) is in the marked location: + +![](../images/x60_security/0000_simcard1.jpg) + Replacement: USB dongle. Now get into the motherboard. -Remove those screws:\ +Remove those screws: + ![](../images/x60_security/0000.jpg) -Push the keyboard forward (carefully):\ +Push the keyboard forward (carefully): + ![](../images/x60_security/0001.jpg) -Lift the keyboard up and disconnect it from the board:\ +Lift the keyboard up and disconnect it from the board: + ![](../images/x60_security/0002.jpg) Grab the right-hand side of the chassis and force it off (gently) and -pry up the rest of the chassis:\ +pry up the rest of the chassis: + ![](../images/x60_security/0003.jpg) -You should now have this:\ +You should now have this: + ![](../images/x60_security/0004.jpg) The following is a summary of what you will remove (already done to this -system):\ -![](../images/x60_security/0001_overview.jpg)\ +system): + +![](../images/x60_security/0001_overview.jpg) + Note: the blue lines represent antenna cables and modem cables. You don't need to remove these, but you can if you want (to make it tidier after removing other parts). I removed the antenna wires, the modem @@ -91,8 +108,10 @@ part where the wwan antenna goes (wasn't sure what it was, but I knew it wasn't needed). **This is optional** Remove the microphone (can desolder it, but you can also easily pull it -off with you hands). Already removed here:\ -![](../images/x60_security/0001_microphone.jpg)\ +off with you hands). Already removed here: + +![](../images/x60_security/0001_microphone.jpg) + Rationale: Another reason to remove the microphone: If your computer gets[\[1\]](#ref1) compromised, it can record what you say, and use it @@ -102,31 +121,42 @@ could theoretically be programmed to accept remote commands from some speaker somewhere (remote security hole). **In other words, the system could already be compromised from the factory.** -Remove the modem:\ -![](../images/x60_security/0001_modem.jpg)\ +Remove the modem: + +![](../images/x60_security/0001_modem.jpg) + (useless, obsolete device) -Remove the speaker:\ -![](../images/x60_security/0001_speaker.jpg)\ +Remove the speaker: + +![](../images/x60_security/0001_speaker.jpg) + Reason: combined with the microphone issue, this could be used to leak -data.\ +data. + If your computer gets[\[1\]](#ref1) compromised, it can be used to transmit data to nearby compromised devices. It's unknown if it can be -turned into a microphone[\[2\]](#ref2).\ +turned into a microphone[\[2\]](#ref2). + Replacement: headphones/speakers (line-out) or external DAC (USB). -Remove the wlan (also remove wwan if you have it):\ -![](../images/x60_security/0001_wlan_wwan.jpg)\ +Remove the wlan (also remove wwan if you have it): + +![](../images/x60_security/0001_wlan_wwan.jpg) + Reason: has direct (and very fast) memory access, and could -(theoretically) leak data over a side-channel.\ +(theoretically) leak data over a side-channel. + **Wifi:** The ath5k/ath9k cards might not have firmware at all. They might safe but could have access to the computer's RAM trough DMA. If people have an intel card(most X60s come with Intel wifi by default, until you change it),then that card runs a non-free firwamre and has access to the computer's RAM trough DMA! So the risk-level is very -high.\ +high. + **Wwan (3g modem):** They run proprietary software! It's like AMT but -over the GSM network which is probably even worse.\ +over the GSM network which is probably even worse. + Replacement: external USB wifi dongle. (or USB wwan/3g dongle; note, this has all the same privacy issues as mobile phones. wwan not recommended). @@ -154,7 +184,8 @@ half of the video to see how to do the above. Also not covered yet: --------------------- -- Intrusion detection: randomized seal on screws\ +- Intrusion detection: randomized seal on screws + Just put nail polish with lot of glider on the important screws, take some good pictures. Keep the pictueres and make sure of their integrity. Compare the nail polish with the pictures before powering @@ -259,7 +290,8 @@ transport), the spies probably already have that since a long time. -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/c201.md b/docs/hcl/c201.md @@ -205,7 +205,8 @@ is such a stupidly simple idea, which all designs should implement. -Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/d510mo.md b/docs/hcl/d510mo.md @@ -15,7 +15,8 @@ Flashing instructions can be found at -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/d945gclf.md b/docs/hcl/d945gclf.md @@ -39,11 +39,16 @@ Remarks about vendor bios: flashing to install libreboot on this device. Once libreboot is flashed there is no problem to update the firmware internally -Here is an image of the board:\ -![](../images/d945gclf/d945gclf.jpg)\ -Here is an image of the D945GCLF2 board:\ -![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141521.jpg){width="80%" height="80%"}\ -And SPI SOIC8 flash chip\ +Here is an image of the board: + +![](../images/d945gclf/d945gclf.jpg) + +Here is an image of the D945GCLF2 board: + +![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141521.jpg){width="80%" height="80%"} + +And SPI SOIC8 flash chip + ![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141550.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"} @@ -53,33 +58,49 @@ How to replace thermal paste and fan This board comes with very crappy disposable loud fan, that one has no bearings, which can not be repaired or oiled properly, do not waste your -time trying to fix it, just buy one chinese same size fan\ +time trying to fix it, just buy one chinese same size fan + ![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141620.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"} -![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141614.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"}\ -Make sure that new one has same wiring\ -![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_142618.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"}\ -This is a new one, with bearing and maintenable\ +![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141614.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"} + +Make sure that new one has same wiring + +![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_142618.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"} + +This is a new one, with bearing and maintenable + ![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141738.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"} -![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141814.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"}\ +![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141814.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"} + Now remove the both coolers rotating them a bit, slowly, then clean both -silicons and both coolers (removing cmos battery first is recommended)\ -![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141601.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"}\ +silicons and both coolers (removing cmos battery first is recommended) + +![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141601.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"} + Put a little bit of non conductive thermal paste on both silicons (only -cpu silicon iis shown on that image)\ -![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_142031.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"}\ +cpu silicon iis shown on that image) + +![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_142031.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"} + Before assembling new fan, some need new longer screws, make sure having -these (on the left is original one, too short for new fan)\ -![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141659.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"}\ -After that, assemble your new fan into CPU cooler\ -![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141635.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"}\ +these (on the left is original one, too short for new fan) + +![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141659.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"} + +After that, assemble your new fan into CPU cooler + +![](../images/d945gclf/20160923_141635.jpg){width="50%" height="50%"} + Finally assemle both coolers on both chips, do not forget put in the CPU fan connector back, and you are done. -Copyright © 2016 Arthur Heymans <arthur@aheymans.xyz>\ -Copyright © 2016 Vitaly Castaño Solana <vita\_cell@hotmail.com>\ +Copyright © 2016 Arthur Heymans <arthur@aheymans.xyz> + +Copyright © 2016 Vitaly Castaño Solana <vita\_cell@hotmail.com> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/ga-g41m-es2l.md b/docs/hcl/ga-g41m-es2l.md @@ -11,7 +11,8 @@ using an IDE SATA adapter. The SATA ports do work. You need to set a custom MAC address in GNU+Linux for the NIC to work. In /etc/network/interfaces on debian-based systems like Debian or -Devuan, this would be in the entry for your NIC:\ +Devuan, this would be in the entry for your NIC: + hwaddress ether macaddressgoeshere Flashing instructions can be found at @@ -19,7 +20,8 @@ Flashing instructions can be found at -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/gm45_remove_me.md b/docs/hcl/gm45_remove_me.md @@ -40,11 +40,13 @@ factory.bin dump. ich9gen executables can be found under ./ich9deblob/ statically compiled in libreboot\_util. If you are using src or git, build ich9gen from -source with:\ +source with: + $ ./oldbuild module ich9deblob The executable will appear under resources/utilities/ich9deblob/ -Run:\ +Run: + $ **./ich9gen** Running ich9gen this way (without any arguments) generates a default @@ -70,7 +72,8 @@ the little sticker on the bottom/base of the laptop. On GM45 laptops that use flash descriptors, the MAC address or the onboard ethernet chipset is flashed (inside the ROM image). You should generate a descriptor+gbe image with your own MAC address inside (with -the Gbe checksum updated to match). Run:\ +the Gbe checksum updated to match). Run: + $ ./ich9gen \--macaddress XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX (replace the XX chars with the hexadecimal chars in the MAC address that you want) @@ -86,16 +89,23 @@ Two new files will be created: Assuming that your libreboot image is named **libreboot.rom**, copy the file to where **libreboot.rom** is located and then insert the -descriptor+gbe file into the ROM image.\ -For 16MiB flash chips:\ +descriptor+gbe file into the ROM image. + +For 16MiB flash chips: + $ **dd if=ich9fdgbe\_16m.bin of=libreboot.rom bs=1 count=12k -conv=notrunc**\ -For 8MiB flash chips:\ +conv=notrunc** + +For 8MiB flash chips: + $ **dd if=ich9fdgbe\_8m.bin of=libreboot.rom bs=1 count=12k -conv=notrunc**\ -For 4MiB flash chips:\ +conv=notrunc** + +For 4MiB flash chips: + $ **dd if=ich9fdgbe\_4m.bin of=libreboot.rom bs=1 count=12k -conv=notrunc**\ +conv=notrunc** + Your libreboot.rom image is now ready to be flashed on the system. Refer back to [../install/#flashrom](../install/#flashrom) for how to flash @@ -165,7 +175,8 @@ regions for your libreboot ROM image. If you are working with libreboot\_src (or git), you can find the source under resources/utilities/ich9deblob/ and will already be compiled if you ran **./oldbuild module all** or **./oldbuild module ich9deblob** -from the main directory (./), otherwise you can build it like so:\ +from the main directory (./), otherwise you can build it like so: + $ ./oldbuild module ich9deblob An executable file named **ich9deblob** will now appear under resources/utilities/ich9deblob/ @@ -177,7 +188,8 @@ GNU+Linux) under ./ich9deblob/. Place the factory.rom from your system (can be obtained using the external flashing guides for GM45 targets linked [../install/](../install/)) in the directory where you have your -ich9deblob executable, then run the tool:\ +ich9deblob executable, then run the tool: + $ **./ich9deblob** A 12kiB file named **deblobbed\_descriptor.bin** will now appear. **Keep @@ -194,7 +206,8 @@ Intel. Only the Intel NICs need a GbE region in the flash chip. Assuming that your libreboot image is named **libreboot.rom**, copy the **deblobbed\_descriptor.bin** file to where **libreboot.rom** is located -and then run:\ +and then run: + $ **dd if=deblobbed\_descriptor.bin of=libreboot.rom bs=1 count=12k conv=notrunc** @@ -233,16 +246,19 @@ The ME interferes with flash read/write in flashrom, and the default descriptor locks some regions. The idea is that doing this will remove all of those restrictions. -Simply run (with factory.rom in the same directory):\ +Simply run (with factory.rom in the same directory): + $ **./demefactory** It will generate a 4KiB descriptor file (only the descriptor, no GbE). Insert that into a factory.rom image (NOTE: do this on a copy of it. -Keep the original factory.rom stored safely somewhere):\ +Keep the original factory.rom stored safely somewhere): + $ **dd if=demefactory\_4kdescriptor.bin of=factory\_nome.rom bs=1 count=4k conv=notrunc** -TODO: test this.\ +TODO: test this. + TODO: lenovobios (GM45 thinkpads) still write-protects parts of the flash. Modify the assembly code inside. Note: the factory.rom (BIOS region) from lenovobios is in a compressed format, which you have to @@ -305,7 +321,8 @@ Flash chips {#flashchips} <http://pdf.datasheetarchive.com/indexerfiles/Datasheets-USER/DSAUPLD00006075.pdf> **~~- Page 20 and page 9 refer to SDA\_HDO or SDA\_HDOUT~~** only on series 6 or higher chipsets. ICH9-M (X200) does it with a strap - connected to GPIO33 pin (see IRC notes below)\ + connected to GPIO33 pin (see IRC notes below) + - According to page 29, the X200 can have any of the following flash chips: - ATMEL AT26DF321-SU 72.26321.A01 - this is a 32Mb (4MiB) chip @@ -540,7 +557,8 @@ It has only a 448 byte fragment different from 0x00 or 0xFF. -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/imac52.md b/docs/hcl/imac52.md @@ -6,7 +6,8 @@ Information to be written soon, but this board is merged in libreboot. -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/index.md b/docs/hcl/index.md @@ -90,10 +90,12 @@ handling. How to find what EC version you have (i945/GM45) {#ecversion} ================================================ -In GNU+Linux, you can try this:\ +In GNU+Linux, you can try this: + **grep 'at EC' /proc/asound/cards** -Sample output:\ +Sample output: + **ThinkPad Console Audio Control at EC reg 0x30, fw 7WHT19WW-3.6** 7WHT19WW is the version in different notation, use search engine to find @@ -348,8 +350,10 @@ cannot be used with libreboot under any circumstances. The following T60 motherboard (see area highlighted in white) shows an empty space where the ATI GPU would be (this particular motherboard has -an Intel GPU):\ -\ +an Intel GPU): + + + ![](../images/t60_dev/t60_unbrick.jpg) The reason that the ATI GPU on T60 is unsupported is due to the VBIOS @@ -359,7 +363,8 @@ work in libreboot. The 'Video BIOS' is what initializes graphics. -See: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_BIOS>.\ +See: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_BIOS>. + In fact, lack of free VBIOS in general is a big problem in coreboot, and is one reason (among others) why many ports for coreboot are unsuitable for libreboot's purpose. @@ -434,10 +439,12 @@ Referenced below are copies (up to date at the time of writing, the macbook2,1. They are included here in case the main site goes down for whatever reason, since they include a lot of useful information. -Backups created using wget:\ +Backups created using wget: + $ wget -m -p -E -k -K -np http://macbook.donderklumpen.de/ **$ wget -m -p -E -k -K -np -http://macbook.donderklumpen.de/coreboot/**\ +http://macbook.donderklumpen.de/coreboot/** + Use **-e robots=off** if using this trick for other sites and the site restricts using robots.txt @@ -588,7 +595,8 @@ libreboot git repository. -Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/kcma-d8.md b/docs/hcl/kcma-d8.md @@ -114,7 +114,8 @@ Check the ASUS website. -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/kfsn4-dre.md b/docs/hcl/kfsn4-dre.md @@ -85,7 +85,8 @@ Other information -Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/kgpe-d16.md b/docs/hcl/kgpe-d16.md @@ -228,7 +228,8 @@ The information here is adapted, from the ASUS website. -Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/r400.md b/docs/hcl/r400.md @@ -73,7 +73,8 @@ TODO: put hardware register logs here like on the [X200](x200.html) and -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/t400.md b/docs/hcl/t400.md @@ -86,7 +86,8 @@ outputs from the T400: -Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/t500.md b/docs/hcl/t500.md @@ -81,7 +81,8 @@ and The patches above are based on the output from ich9deblob on a factory.rom image dumped from the T500 with a SOIC-8 4MiB flash chip. The patch re-creates the X200 descriptor/gbe source, so the commands -were something like:\ +were something like: + $ diff -u t500gbe x200gbe $ **diff -u t500descriptor x200descriptor** @@ -108,7 +109,8 @@ outputs from the T500: -Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/hcl/x200.md b/docs/hcl/x200.md @@ -257,7 +257,8 @@ be useful for RAM compatibility info (note: coreboot raminit is different, so this page might be BS) pehjota started collecting some steppings for different CPUs on several -X200 laptops. You can get the CPUID by running:\ +X200 laptops. You can get the CPUID by running: + $ **dmesg | sed -n 's/\^.* microcode: CPU0 sig=0x\\(\[\^,\]*\\),.*$/\\1/p'** @@ -296,8 +297,10 @@ Unsorted notes {#unsorted} -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ -Copyright © 2015 Patrick "P. J." McDermott <pj@pehjota.net>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + +Copyright © 2015 Patrick "P. J." McDermott <pj@pehjota.net> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/index.md b/docs/index.md @@ -103,20 +103,26 @@ The libreboot project has three main goals: - ***Make coreboot easy to use***. Coreboot is notoriously difficult to install, due to an overall lack of user-focussed documentation and support. Most people will simply give up before attempting to - install coreboot.\ - \ + install coreboot. + + + Libreboot attempts to bridge this divide, making sure that everything from building to installing coreboot is automated, as much as is feasibly possible. Secondly, the project produces documentation aimed at non-technical users. Thirdly, the project attempts to provide excellent user support via mailing lists and - IRC.\ - \ + IRC. + + + Libreboot already comes with a payload (GRUB), flashrom and other needed parts. Everything is fully integrated, in a way where most of the complicated steps that are otherwise required, are instead done - for the user in advance.\ - \ + for the user in advance. + + + You can download ROM images for your libreboot system and install them, without having to build anything from source. The build system is also fully automated, so building from source is easy if you @@ -166,7 +172,8 @@ If you are at least 127 commits after release 20150518 (commit message *build/roms/helper: add version information to CBFS*) (or you have any **upstream** stable release of libreboot after 20150518), then you can press C at the GRUB console, and use this command to find out what -version of libreboot you have:\ +version of libreboot you have: + cat (cbfsdisk)/lbversion This will also work on non-release images (the version string is automatically generated, using *git describe \--tags HEAD*), built from @@ -176,7 +183,8 @@ archives that you downloaded (if you are using release archives). If it exists, you can also extract this *lbversion* file by using the *cbfstool* utility which libreboot includes, from a ROM image that you either dumped or haven't flashed yet. In your distribution, run -cbfstool on your ROM image (*libreboot.rom*, in this example):\ +cbfstool on your ROM image (*libreboot.rom*, in this example): + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n lbversion -f lbversion You will now have a file, named *lbversion*, which you can read in whatever program it is that you use for reading/writing text files. @@ -187,7 +195,8 @@ For releases on or below 20150518, or snapshots generated from the git repository below 127 commits after 20150518, you can find a file named *commitid* inside the archives. If you are using pre-built ROM images from the libreboot project, you can press C in GRUB for access to the -terminal, and then run this command:\ +terminal, and then run this command: + lscoreboot You may find a date in here, detailing when that ROM image was built. For pre-built images distributed by the libreboot project, this is a @@ -214,7 +223,8 @@ libreboot. -Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/bbb_setup.md b/docs/install/bbb_setup.md @@ -137,7 +137,8 @@ to a thicker piece of wire (you could use a paper clip), or wedge the male end of the jumper cable into the sides of the hole in the connector, instead of going through the centre. -Here is an example set up:\ +Here is an example set up: + ![](images/x200/psu33.jpg "Copyright © 2015 Patrick "P. J." McDermott <pj@pehjota.net> see license notice at the end of this document") @@ -157,14 +158,18 @@ Alternatives to SSH (in case SSH fails) --------------------------------------- You can also use a serial FTDI debug board with GNU Screen, to access -the serial console.\ +the serial console. + # screen /dev/ttyUSB0 115200 -Here are some example photos:\ -![](images/x200/ftdi.jpg) ![](images/x200/ftdi_port.jpg)\ +Here are some example photos: + +![](images/x200/ftdi.jpg) ![](images/x200/ftdi_port.jpg) + You can also connect the USB cable from the BBB to another computer and a new network interface will appear, with its own IP address. This is -directly accessible from SSH, or screen:\ +directly accessible from SSH, or screen: + # **screen /dev/ttyACM0 115200** You can also access the uboot console, using the serial method instead @@ -210,13 +215,15 @@ contents of this file with: Run **apt-get update** and **apt-get upgrade** then reboot the BBB, before continuing. -Check that the firmware exists:\ +Check that the firmware exists: + # ls /lib/firmware/BB-SPI0-01-00A0.* Output: /lib/firmware/BB-SPI0-01-00A0.dtbo -Then:\ +Then: + # echo BB-SPI0-01 > /sys/devices/bone\_capemgr.*/slots # cat /sys/devices/bone\_capemgr.*/slots Output: @@ -229,14 +236,16 @@ Output: 5: ff:P-O-L Bone-Black-HDMI,00A0,Texas Instrument,BB-BONELT-HDMI 7: ff:P-O-L Override Board Name,00A0,Override Manuf,BB-SPI0-01 -Verify that the spidev device now exists:\ +Verify that the spidev device now exists: + # ls -al /dev/spid* Output: crw-rw---T 1 root spi 153, 0 Nov 19 21:07 /dev/spidev1.0 Now the BBB is ready to be used for flashing. Make this persist across -reboots:\ +reboots: + In /etc/default/capemgr add **CAPE=BB-SPI0-01** at the end (or change the existing **CAPE=** entry to say that, if an entry already exists. @@ -252,7 +261,8 @@ libreboot\_src, and put the ARM binary for it on your BBB. Finally, get the ROM image that you would like to flash and put that on your BBB. -Now test flashrom:\ +Now test flashrom: + # ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 Output: @@ -333,7 +343,8 @@ should.** if you need to extend the 3.3v psu leads, just use the same colour M-F leads, **but** keep all other leads short (10cm or less) -You should now have something that looks like this:\ +You should now have something that looks like this: + ![](images/x200/5252_bbb0.jpg) ![](images/x200/5252_bbb1.jpg) [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -360,9 +371,12 @@ following configuration: -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ -Copyright © 2015 Patrick "P. J." McDermott <pj@pehjota.net>\ -Copyright © 2015 Albin Söderqvist\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + +Copyright © 2015 Patrick "P. J." McDermott <pj@pehjota.net> + +Copyright © 2015 Albin Söderqvist + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/c201.md b/docs/install/c201.md @@ -23,12 +23,14 @@ flashrom version. **Google's modified version of flashrom** is free software and its source code is made available by Google: -[flashrom](https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromiumos/third_party/flashrom/).\ +[flashrom](https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromiumos/third_party/flashrom/). + It is not distributed along with Libreboot yet. However, it is preinstalled on the device, with ChromeOS. Installing Libreboot internally requires sufficient privileges on the -system installed on the device.\ +system installed on the device. + When the device has ChromeOS installed (as it does initially), it is necessary to gain root privileges in ChromeOS, to be able to access a root shell. @@ -68,7 +70,8 @@ or by pressing **Ctrl + D** After the system has booted, root access can be enabled by clicking on the **Enable debugging features** link. A confirmation dialog will ask -whether to proceed.\ +whether to proceed. + After confirming by clicking **Proceed**, the device will reboot and ask for the root password to set. Finally, the operation has to be confirmed by clicking **Enable**. @@ -147,23 +150,28 @@ transferred to the device. The following operations have to be executed with root privileges on the device (e.g. using the *root* account). In addition, the -**cros-flash-replace** script has to be made executable:\ +**cros-flash-replace** script has to be made executable: + # chmod a+x cros-flash-replace -The SPI flash has to be read first:\ +The SPI flash has to be read first: + # flashrom -p host -r flash.img **Note: it might be a good idea to copy the produced flash.img file at this point and store it outside of the device for backup purposes.** -Then, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be executed as such:\ +Then, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be executed as such: + # ./cros-flash-replace flash.img coreboot ro-frid If any error is shown, it is definitely a bad idea to go further than this point. -The resulting flash image can then be flashed back:\ +The resulting flash image can then be flashed back: + # flashrom -p host -w flash.img -You should also see within the output the following:\ +You should also see within the output the following: + **"Verifying flash... VERIFIED."** Shut down. The device will now boot to Libreboot. @@ -194,24 +202,29 @@ transferred to the host. The following operations have to be executed with root privileges on the host (e.g. using the *root* account). In addition, the -**cros-flash-replace** script has to be made executable:\ +**cros-flash-replace** script has to be made executable: + # chmod a+x cros-flash-replace -The SPI flash has to be read first (using the right spi programmer):\ +The SPI flash has to be read first (using the right spi programmer): + # flashrom -p *programmer* -r flash.img **Note: it might be a good idea to copy the produced flash.img file at this point and store it outside of the device for backup purposes.** -Then, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be executed as such:\ +Then, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be executed as such: + # ./cros-flash-replace flash.img coreboot ro-frid If any error is shown, it is definitely a bad idea to go further than this point. The resulting flash image can then be flashed back (using the right spi -programmer):\ +programmer): + # flashrom -p *programmer* -w flash.img -You should also see within the output the following:\ +You should also see within the output the following: + **"Verifying flash... VERIFIED."** The device will now boot to Libreboot. @@ -231,7 +244,8 @@ See <https://wiki.debian.org/InstallingDebianOn/Asus/C201>. -Copyright © 2015 Paul Kocialkowski <contact@paulk.fr>\ +Copyright © 2015 Paul Kocialkowski <contact@paulk.fr> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/d510mo.md b/docs/install/d510mo.md @@ -11,7 +11,8 @@ motherboard while they still have the original BIOS present. Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ +Use this to find out: + # **flashrom -p internal -V** [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -24,12 +25,14 @@ Flashing instructions {#clip} Refer to [bbb\_setup.html](bbb_setup.html) for how to set up the BBB for flashing. -This is an image of the flash chip, for reference:\ +This is an image of the flash chip, for reference: + ![](../images/d510mo/d510mo.jpg) -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/d945gclf.md b/docs/install/d945gclf.md @@ -17,12 +17,14 @@ Flashing instructions {#clip} Refer to [bbb\_setup.html](bbb_setup.html) for how to set up the BBB for external flashing. -Here is an image of the flash chip:\ +Here is an image of the flash chip: + ![](../images/d945gclf/d945gclf_spi.jpg) -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/ga-g41m-es2l.md b/docs/install/ga-g41m-es2l.md @@ -11,7 +11,8 @@ motherboard while they still have the original BIOS present. Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ +Use this to find out: + # **flashrom -p internal -V** [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -28,16 +29,19 @@ by connecting 3v3 to /CS of that chip, so you will actually need 2 test clips (you also need to connect GND on the chip that you're disabling).** -Here is an image of the flash chip:\ +Here is an image of the flash chip: + ![](../images/ga-g41m-es2l/ga-g41m-es2l.jpg) Internal flashing is possible. Boot with the proprietary BIOS and GNU+Linux. There are 2 flash chips (one is backup). -Flash the first chip:\ +Flash the first chip: + **./flashrom -p internal:dualbiosindex=0 -w libreboot.rom** -Flash the second chip:\ +Flash the second chip: + **./flashrom -p internal:dualbiosindex=1 -w libreboot.rom** NOTE: you can still boot the system with just the main flash chip @@ -53,7 +57,8 @@ operating system. -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/index.md b/docs/install/index.md @@ -253,7 +253,8 @@ ROM image, and it should work.** Flash chip size --------------- -Use this to find out:\ +Use this to find out: + # **flashrom -p internal -V** All good? @@ -273,14 +274,16 @@ appropriate executable. It is also possible for you to build these executables from the libreboot source code archives. -How to update the flash chip contents:\ +How to update the flash chip contents: + $ **sudo ./flash update [yourrom.rom](#rom)** Ocassionally, coreboot changes the name of a given board. If flashrom complains about a board mismatch, but you are sure that you chose the -correct ROM image, then run this alternative command:\ +correct ROM image, then run this alternative command: + $ **sudo ./flash forceupdate [yourrom.rom](#rom)** @@ -319,16 +322,19 @@ the flashing script. do this: *rm -f patch && wget -O flash https://notabug.org/vimuser/libreboot/raw/9d850543ad90b72e0e333c98075530b31e5d23f1/flash && chmod +x flash*** -The first half of the procedure is as follows:\ +The first half of the procedure is as follows: + $ **sudo ./flash i945lenovo\_firstflash [yourrom.rom](#rom).** -You should see within the output the following:\ +You should see within the output the following: + **"Updated BUC.TS=1 - 64kb address ranges at 0xFFFE0000 and 0xFFFF0000 are swapped"**. -You should also see within the output the following:\ +You should also see within the output the following: + **"Your flash chip is in an unknown state"**, **"FAILED"** and "DO NOT REBOOT OR POWEROFF" Seeing this means that the operation was a **resounding** success! @@ -343,20 +349,24 @@ and then boot; libreboot is running, but there is a 2nd procedure -When you have booted up again, you must also do this:\ +When you have booted up again, you must also do this: + $ **sudo ./flash i945lenovo\_secondflash [yourrom.rom](#rom)** -If flashing fails at this stage, try the following:\ +If flashing fails at this stage, try the following: + $ **sudo ./flashrom/i686/flashrom -p internal:laptop=force\_I\_want\_a\_brick -w [yourrom.rom](#rom)** -You should see within the output the following:\ +You should see within the output the following: + **"Updated BUC.TS=0 - 128kb address range 0xFFFE0000-0xFFFFFFFF is untranslated"** -You should also see within the output the following:\ +You should also see within the output the following: + **"Verifying flash... VERIFIED."** @@ -392,12 +402,14 @@ Look at the [list of ROM images](#rom) to see which image is compatible with your device. -Use this flashing script, to install libreboot:\ +Use this flashing script, to install libreboot: + $ **sudo ./flash i945apple\_firstflash [yourrom.rom](#rom)** -You should also see within the output the following:\ +You should also see within the output the following: + **"Verifying flash... VERIFIED."** Shut down. @@ -407,7 +419,8 @@ Shut down. -Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/kcma-d8.md b/docs/install/kcma-d8.md @@ -37,7 +37,8 @@ extractor tool. -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/kgpe-d16.md b/docs/install/kgpe-d16.md @@ -48,7 +48,8 @@ extractor tool. -Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/r400_external.md b/docs/install/r400_external.md @@ -72,7 +72,8 @@ See [#paste](#paste). Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ +Use this to find out: + # flashrom -p internal -V [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -131,73 +132,95 @@ for SOIC-8 (clip: Pomona 5250): Disassembly ----------- -Remove all screws:\ -![](images/r400/0000.jpg)\ -Remove the HDD and optical drive:\ -![](images/r400/0001.jpg)\ -Remove the hinge screws:\ +Remove all screws: + +![](images/r400/0000.jpg) + +Remove the HDD and optical drive: + +![](images/r400/0001.jpg) + +Remove the hinge screws: + ![](images/r400/0002.jpg) ![](images/r400/0003.jpg) -Remove the palm rest and keyboard:\ +Remove the palm rest and keyboard: + ![](images/r400/0004.jpg) ![](images/r400/0005.jpg) -Remove these screws, and then remove the bezel:\ +Remove these screws, and then remove the bezel: + ![](images/r400/0006.jpg) ![](images/r400/0007.jpg) Remove the speaker screws, but don't remove the speakers yet (just set -them loose):\ +them loose): + ![](images/r400/0008.jpg) ![](images/r400/0009.jpg) ![](images/r400/0010.jpg) -Remove these screws, and then remove the metal plate:\ +Remove these screws, and then remove the metal plate: + ![](images/r400/0011.jpg) ![](images/r400/0012.jpg) ![](images/r400/0013.jpg) -Remove the antennas from the wifi card, and then start unrouting them:\ +Remove the antennas from the wifi card, and then start unrouting them: + ![](images/r400/0014.jpg) ![](images/r400/0015.jpg) ![](images/r400/0016.jpg) ![](images/r400/0017.jpg) ![](images/r400/0018.jpg) ![](images/r400/0019.jpg) -Disconnect the LCD cable from the motherboard:\ +Disconnect the LCD cable from the motherboard: + ![](images/r400/0020.jpg) ![](images/r400/0021.jpg) ![](images/r400/0022.jpg) ![](images/r400/0023.jpg) -Remove the hinge screws, and then remove the LCD panel:\ +Remove the hinge screws, and then remove the LCD panel: + ![](images/r400/0024.jpg) ![](images/r400/0025.jpg) ![](images/r400/0026.jpg) ![](images/r400/0027.jpg) -Remove this:\ +Remove this: + ![](images/r400/0028.jpg) ![](images/r400/0029.jpg) -Remove this long cable (there are 3 connections):\ +Remove this long cable (there are 3 connections): + ![](images/r400/0030.jpg) ![](images/r400/0031.jpg) ![](images/r400/0032.jpg) ![](images/r400/0033.jpg) -Disconnect the speaker cable, and remove the speakers:\ +Disconnect the speaker cable, and remove the speakers: + ![](images/r400/0034.jpg) Remove the heatsink screws, remove the fan and then remove the -heatsink/fan:\ +heatsink/fan: + ![](images/r400/0035.jpg) ![](images/r400/0036.jpg) ![](images/r400/0037.jpg) ![](images/r400/0038.jpg) -Remove the NVRAM battery:\ +Remove the NVRAM battery: + ![](images/r400/0039.jpg) ![](images/r400/0040.jpg) -Remove this screw:\ +Remove this screw: + ![](images/r400/0041.jpg) ![](images/r400/0042.jpg) -Disconnect the AC jack:\ +Disconnect the AC jack: + ![](images/r400/0043.jpg) ![](images/r400/0044.jpg) -Remove this screw and then remove what is under it:\ +Remove this screw and then remove what is under it: + ![](images/r400/0045.jpg) -Remove this:\ +Remove this: + ![](images/r400/0046.jpg) Lift the motherboard (which is still inside the cage) from the side on -the right, removing it completely:\ +the right, removing it completely: + ![](images/r400/0047.jpg) ![](images/r400/0048.jpg) Remove all screws, marking each hole so that you know where to re-insert @@ -206,19 +229,23 @@ that they were in before removal: ![](images/r400/0049.jpg) ![](images/r400/0050.jpg) Remove the motherboard from the cage, and the SPI flash chip will be -next to the memory slots:\ +next to the memory slots: + ![](images/r400/0051.jpg) ![](images/r400/0052.jpg) -Connect your programmer, then connect GND and 3.3V\ +Connect your programmer, then connect GND and 3.3V + ![](images/t400/0065.jpg) ![](images/t400/0066.jpg) ![](images/t400/0067.jpg) ![](images/t400/0069.jpg) ![](images/t400/0070.jpg) ![](images/t400/0071.jpg) A dedicated 3.3V PSU was used to create this guide, but at ATX PSU is -also fine:\ +also fine: + ![](images/t400/0072.jpg) -Of course, make sure to turn on your PSU:\ +Of course, make sure to turn on your PSU: + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0013.jpg) Now, you should be ready to install libreboot. @@ -230,7 +257,8 @@ source code which can be built. Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). -Test that flashrom works:\ +Test that flashrom works: + # ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 In this case, the output was: @@ -244,17 +272,23 @@ In this case, the output was: Please specify which chip definition to use with the -c <chipname> option. How to backup factory.rom (change the -c option as neeed, for your flash -chip):\ +chip): + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory.rom**\ +factory.rom** + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory1.rom**\ +factory1.rom** + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory2.rom**\ +factory2.rom** + Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* -have been removed.\ -Now compare the 3 images:\ +have been removed. + +Now compare the 3 images: + # sha512sum factory*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This @@ -269,7 +303,8 @@ flashing it. Although there is a default MAC address inside the ROM image, this is not what you want. **Make sure to always change the MAC address to one that is correct for your system.** -Now flash it:\ +Now flash it: + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -w path/to/libreboot/rom/image.rom -V** @@ -334,7 +369,8 @@ whitelist of approved chips, and it will refuse to boot if you use an 'unauthorized' wifi card. The following photos show an Atheros AR5B95 being installed, to replace -the Intel chip that this R400 came with:\ +the Intel chip that this R400 came with: + ![](images/t400/0012.jpg) ![](images/t400/ar5b95.jpg) @@ -364,7 +400,8 @@ Make sure that the RAM you buy is the 2Rx8 density. be useful for RAM compatibility info (note: coreboot raminit is different, so this page might be BS) -The following photo shows 8GiB (2x4GiB) of RAM installed:\ +The following photo shows 8GiB (2x4GiB) of RAM installed: + ![](images/t400/memory.jpg) @@ -380,7 +417,8 @@ Now [install GNU+Linux](../gnulinux/). -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/rpi_setup.md b/docs/install/rpi_setup.md @@ -427,10 +427,14 @@ box.](http://www.flashrom.org/RaspberryPi) -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Lawrence Wu <sagnessagiel@gmail.com>\ -Copyright © 2015 snuffeluffegus <>\ -Copyright © 2015 Kevin Keijzer <>\ -Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Lawrence Wu <sagnessagiel@gmail.com> + +Copyright © 2015 snuffeluffegus <> + +Copyright © 2015 Kevin Keijzer <> + +Copyright © 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/t400_external.md b/docs/install/t400_external.md @@ -77,7 +77,8 @@ See [#paste](#paste). Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ +Use this to find out: + # **flashrom -p internal -V** [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -137,72 +138,90 @@ for SOIC-8 (clip: Pomona 5250): The procedure ------------- -Remove *all* screws, placing them in the order that you removed them:\ +Remove *all* screws, placing them in the order that you removed them: + ![](images/t400/0001.jpg) ![](images/t400/0002.jpg) -Remove those three screws then remove the rear bezel:\ +Remove those three screws then remove the rear bezel: + ![](images/t400/0003.jpg) ![](images/t400/0004.jpg) ![](images/t400/0005.jpg) ![](images/t400/0006.jpg) -Remove the speakers:\ +Remove the speakers: + ![](images/t400/0007.jpg) ![](images/t400/0008.jpg) ![](images/t400/0009.jpg) ![](images/t400/0010.jpg) ![](images/t400/0011.jpg) -Remove the wifi:\ +Remove the wifi: + ![](images/t400/0012.jpg) ![](images/t400/0013.jpg) -Remove this cable:\ +Remove this cable: + ![](images/t400/0014.jpg) ![](images/t400/0015.jpg) ![](images/t400/0016.jpg) ![](images/t400/0017.jpg) ![](images/t400/0018.jpg) -Unroute those antenna wires:\ +Unroute those antenna wires: + ![](images/t400/0019.jpg) ![](images/t400/0020.jpg) ![](images/t400/0021.jpg) ![](images/t400/0022.jpg) ![](images/t400/0023.jpg) -Remove the LCD assembly:\ +Remove the LCD assembly: + ![](images/t400/0024.jpg) ![](images/t400/0025.jpg) ![](images/t400/0026.jpg) ![](images/t400/0027.jpg) ![](images/t400/0028.jpg) ![](images/t400/0029.jpg) ![](images/t400/0030.jpg) ![](images/t400/0031.jpg) -Disconnect the NVRAM battery:\ +Disconnect the NVRAM battery: + ![](images/t400/0033.jpg) -Disconnect the fan:\ +Disconnect the fan: + ![](images/t400/0034.jpg) -Unscrew these:\ +Unscrew these: + ![](images/t400/0035.jpg) ![](images/t400/0036.jpg) ![](images/t400/0037.jpg) ![](images/t400/0038.jpg) -Unscrew the heatsink, then lift it off:\ +Unscrew the heatsink, then lift it off: + ![](images/t400/0039.jpg) ![](images/t400/0040.jpg) -Disconnect the power jack:\ +Disconnect the power jack: + ![](images/t400/0041.jpg) ![](images/t400/0042.jpg) -Loosen this:\ +Loosen this: + ![](images/t400/0043.jpg) -Remove this:\ +Remove this: + ![](images/t400/0044.jpg) ![](images/t400/0045.jpg) ![](images/t400/0046.jpg) ![](images/t400/0047.jpg) ![](images/t400/0048.jpg) -Unscrew these:\ +Unscrew these: + ![](images/t400/0049.jpg) ![](images/t400/0050.jpg) -Remove this:\ +Remove this: + ![](images/t400/0051.jpg) ![](images/t400/0052.jpg) -Unscrew this:\ +Unscrew this: + ![](images/t400/0053.jpg) Remove the motherboard (the cage is still attached) from the right hand -side, then lift it out:\ +side, then lift it out: + ![](images/t400/0054.jpg) ![](images/t400/0055.jpg) ![](images/t400/0056.jpg) @@ -212,19 +231,23 @@ later): ![](images/t400/0057.jpg) ![](images/t400/0058.jpg) ![](images/t400/0059.jpg) ![](images/t400/0060.jpg) ![](images/t400/0061.jpg) ![](images/t400/0062.jpg) -Separate the motherboard:\ +Separate the motherboard: + ![](images/t400/0063.jpg) ![](images/t400/0064.jpg) -Connect your programmer, then connect GND and 3.3V\ +Connect your programmer, then connect GND and 3.3V + ![](images/t400/0065.jpg) ![](images/t400/0066.jpg) ![](images/t400/0067.jpg) ![](images/t400/0069.jpg) ![](images/t400/0070.jpg) ![](images/t400/0071.jpg) A dedicated 3.3V PSU was used to create this guide, but at ATX PSU is -also fine:\ +also fine: + ![](images/t400/0072.jpg) -Of course, make sure to turn on your PSU:\ +Of course, make sure to turn on your PSU: + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0013.jpg) Now, you should be ready to install libreboot. @@ -236,7 +259,8 @@ source code which can be built. Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). -Test that flashrom works:\ +Test that flashrom works: + # ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 In this case, the output was: @@ -250,17 +274,23 @@ In this case, the output was: Please specify which chip definition to use with the -c <chipname> option. How to backup factory.rom (change the -c option as neeed, for your flash -chip):\ +chip): + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory.rom**\ +factory.rom** + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory1.rom**\ +factory1.rom** + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory2.rom**\ +factory2.rom** + Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* -have been removed.\ -Now compare the 3 images:\ +have been removed. + +Now compare the 3 images: + # sha512sum factory*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This @@ -275,7 +305,8 @@ flashing it. Although there is a default MAC address inside the ROM image, this is not what you want. **Make sure to always change the MAC address to one that is correct for your system.** -Now flash it:\ +Now flash it: + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -w path/to/libreboot/rom/image.rom -V** @@ -340,7 +371,8 @@ whitelist of approved chips, and it will refuse to boot if you use an 'unauthorized' wifi card. The following photos show an Atheros AR5B95 being installed, to replace -the Intel chip that this T400 came with:\ +the Intel chip that this T400 came with: + ![](images/t400/0012.jpg) ![](images/t400/ar5b95.jpg) @@ -370,7 +402,8 @@ Make sure that the RAM you buy is the 2Rx8 density. be useful for RAM compatibility info (note: coreboot raminit is different, so this page might be BS) -The following photo shows 8GiB (2x4GiB) of RAM installed:\ +The following photo shows 8GiB (2x4GiB) of RAM installed: + ![](images/t400/memory.jpg) @@ -386,7 +419,8 @@ Now [install GNU+Linux](../gnulinux/). -Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/t500_external.md b/docs/install/t500_external.md @@ -67,7 +67,8 @@ See [#paste](#paste). Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ +Use this to find out: + # **flashrom -p internal -V** [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -127,20 +128,26 @@ for SOIC-8 (clip: Pomona 5250): The procedure ------------- -Remove all screws:\ -![](images/t500/0000.jpg)\ +Remove all screws: + +![](images/t500/0000.jpg) + It is also advisable to, throughout the disassembly, place any screws and/or components that you removed in the same layout or arrangement. -The follow photos demonstrate this:\ +The follow photos demonstrate this: + ![](images/t500/0001.jpg) ![](images/t500/0002.jpg) -Remove the HDD/SSD and optical drive:\ +Remove the HDD/SSD and optical drive: + ![](images/t500/0003.jpg) ![](images/t500/0004.jpg) -Remove the palm rest:\ +Remove the palm rest: + ![](images/t500/0005.jpg) ![](images/t500/0006.jpg) -Remove the keyboard and rear bezel:\ +Remove the keyboard and rear bezel: + ![](images/t500/0007.jpg) ![](images/t500/0008.jpg) ![](images/t500/0009.jpg) ![](images/t500/0010.jpg) ![](images/t500/0011.jpg) ![](images/t500/0012.jpg) @@ -148,88 +155,109 @@ Remove the keyboard and rear bezel:\ If you have a WWAN/3G card and/or sim card reader, remove them permanently. The WWAN-3G card has proprietary firmware inside; the technology is identical to what is used in mobile phones, so it can also -track your movements:\ +track your movements: + ![](images/t500/0013.jpg) ![](images/t500/0017.jpg) ![](images/t500/0018.jpg) -Remove this frame, and then remove the wifi chip:\ +Remove this frame, and then remove the wifi chip: + ![](images/t500/0014.jpg) ![](images/t500/0015.jpg) ![](images/t500/0016.jpg) -Remove the speakers:\ +Remove the speakers: + ![](images/t500/0019.jpg) ![](images/t500/0020.jpg) ![](images/t500/0021.jpg) ![](images/t500/0022.jpg) ![](images/t500/0023.jpg) ![](images/t500/0024.jpg) ![](images/t500/0025.jpg) -Remove the NVRAM battery (already removed in this photo):\ +Remove the NVRAM battery (already removed in this photo): + ![](images/t500/0026.jpg) When you re-assemble, you will be replacing the wifi chip with another. These two screws don't hold anything together, but they are included in your system because the screw holes for half-height cards are a different size, so use these if you will be installing a half-height -card:\ +card: + ![](images/t500/0027.jpg) -Unroute the antenna wires:\ +Unroute the antenna wires: + ![](images/t500/0028.jpg) ![](images/t500/0029.jpg) ![](images/t500/0030.jpg) ![](images/t500/0031.jpg) -Disconnect the LCD cable from the motherboard:\ +Disconnect the LCD cable from the motherboard: + ![](images/t500/0032.jpg) ![](images/t500/0033.jpg) -Remove the LCD assembly hinge screws, and then remove the LCD assembly:\ +Remove the LCD assembly hinge screws, and then remove the LCD assembly: + ![](images/t500/0034.jpg) ![](images/t500/0035.jpg) ![](images/t500/0036.jpg) -Remove the fan and heatsink:\ +Remove the fan and heatsink: + ![](images/t500/0037.jpg) ![](images/t500/0038.jpg) ![](images/t500/0039.jpg) -Remove this screw:\ +Remove this screw: + ![](images/t500/0040.jpg) Remove these cables, keeping note of how and in what arrangement they -are connected:\ +are connected: + ![](images/t500/0041.jpg) ![](images/t500/0042.jpg) ![](images/t500/0043.jpg) ![](images/t500/0044.jpg) ![](images/t500/0045.jpg) ![](images/t500/0046.jpg) ![](images/t500/0047.jpg) ![](images/t500/0048.jpg) ![](images/t500/0049.jpg) -Disconnect the power jack:\ +Disconnect the power jack: + ![](images/t500/0050.jpg) ![](images/t500/0051.jpg) Remove the motherboard and cage from the base (the marked hole is where -those cables were routed through):\ +those cables were routed through): + ![](images/t500/0052.jpg) ![](images/t500/0053.jpg) Remove all screws, arranging them in the same layout when placing the screws on a surface and marking each screw hole (this is to reduce the -possibility of putting them back in the wrong holes):\ +possibility of putting them back in the wrong holes): + ![](images/t500/0054.jpg) ![](images/t500/0055.jpg) -Also remove this:\ +Also remove this: + ![](images/t500/0056.jpg) ![](images/t500/0057.jpg) -Separate the motherboard from the cage:\ +Separate the motherboard from the cage: + ![](images/t500/0058.jpg) ![](images/t500/0059.jpg) The flash chip is next to the memory slots. On this system, it was a -SOIC-8 (4MiB or 32Mb) flash chip:\ +SOIC-8 (4MiB or 32Mb) flash chip: + ![](images/t500/0060.jpg) -Connect your programmer, then connect GND and 3.3V\ -![](images/t500/0061.jpg)\ +Connect your programmer, then connect GND and 3.3V + +![](images/t500/0061.jpg) + ![](images/t400/0067.jpg) ![](images/t400/0069.jpg) ![](images/t400/0070.jpg) ![](images/t400/0071.jpg) A dedicated 3.3V PSU was used to create this guide, but at ATX PSU is -also fine:\ +also fine: + ![](images/t400/0072.jpg) -Of course, make sure to turn on your PSU:\ +Of course, make sure to turn on your PSU: + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0013.jpg) Now, you should be ready to install libreboot. @@ -241,7 +269,8 @@ source code which can be built. Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). -Test that flashrom works:\ +Test that flashrom works: + # ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 In this case, the output was: @@ -255,17 +284,23 @@ In this case, the output was: Please specify which chip definition to use with the -c <chipname> option. How to backup factory.rom (change the -c option as neeed, for your flash -chip):\ +chip): + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory.rom**\ +factory.rom** + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory1.rom**\ +factory1.rom** + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory2.rom**\ +factory2.rom** + Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* -have been removed.\ -Now compare the 3 images:\ +have been removed. + +Now compare the 3 images: + # sha512sum factory*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This @@ -280,7 +315,8 @@ flashing it. Although there is a default MAC address inside the ROM image, this is not what you want. **Make sure to always change the MAC address to one that is correct for your system.** -Now flash it:\ +Now flash it: + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -w path/to/libreboot/rom/image.rom -V** @@ -345,7 +381,8 @@ whitelist of approved chips, and it will refuse to boot if you use an 'unauthorized' wifi card. The following photos show an Atheros AR5B95 being installed, to replace -the Intel chip that this T500 came with:\ +the Intel chip that this T500 came with: + ![](images/t400/0012.jpg) ![](images/t400/ar5b95.jpg) @@ -375,7 +412,8 @@ Make sure that the RAM you buy is the 2Rx8 density. be useful for RAM compatibility info (note: coreboot raminit is different, so this page might be BS) -The following photo shows 8GiB (2x4GiB) of RAM installed:\ +The following photo shows 8GiB (2x4GiB) of RAM installed: + ![](images/t400/memory.jpg) @@ -391,7 +429,8 @@ Now [install GNU+Linux](../gnulinux/). -Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/t60_unbrick.md b/docs/install/t60_unbrick.md @@ -24,22 +24,31 @@ Brick type 1: bucts not reset. {#bucts_brick} You still have Lenovo BIOS, or you had libreboot running and you flashed another ROM; and you had bucts 1 set and the ROM wasn't dd'd.* or if -Lenovo BIOS was present and libreboot wasn't flashed.\ -\ +Lenovo BIOS was present and libreboot wasn't flashed. + + + In this case, unbricking is easy: reset BUC.TS to 0 by removing that yellow cmos coin (it's a battery) and putting it back after a minute or -two:\ -![](../images/t60_dev/0006.JPG)\ -\ +two: + +![](../images/t60_dev/0006.JPG) + + + *Those dd commands should be applied to all newly compiled T60 ROM images (the ROM images in libreboot binary archives already have this -applied!):\ +applied!): + dd if=coreboot.rom of=top64k.bin bs=1 skip=$\[$(stat -c %s -coreboot.rom) - 0x10000\] count=64k\ +coreboot.rom) - 0x10000\] count=64k + dd if=coreboot.rom bs=1 skip=$\[$(stat -c %s coreboot.rom) - 0x20000\] -count=64k | hexdump\ +count=64k | hexdump + dd if=top64k.bin of=coreboot.rom bs=1 seek=$\[$(stat -c %s -coreboot.rom) - 0x20000\] count=64k conv=notrunc\ +coreboot.rom) - 0x20000\] count=64k conv=notrunc + (doing this makes the ROM suitable for use when flashing a system that still has Lenovo BIOS running, using those instructions: <http://www.coreboot.org/Board:lenovo/x60/Installation>. (it says x60, @@ -61,62 +70,80 @@ you can't boot the system, making this difficult. In this situation, external hardware (see hardware requirements above) is needed which can flash the SPI chip (where libreboot resides). -Remove those screws and remove the HDD:\ +Remove those screws and remove the HDD: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0001.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0002.JPG) -Lift off the palm rest:\ +Lift off the palm rest: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0003.JPG) Lift up the keyboard, pull it back a bit, flip it over like that and -then disconnect it from the board:\ +then disconnect it from the board: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0004.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0005.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0006.JPG) -Gently wedge both sides loose:\ +Gently wedge both sides loose: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0007.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0008.JPG) -Remove that cable from the position:\ +Remove that cable from the position: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0009.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0010.JPG) Now remove that bezel. Remove wifi, nvram battery and speaker connector -(also remove 56k modem, on the left of wifi):\ +(also remove 56k modem, on the left of wifi): + ![](../images/t60_dev/0011.JPG) -Remove those screws:\ +Remove those screws: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0012.JPG) -Disconnect the power jack:\ +Disconnect the power jack: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0013.JPG) -Remove nvram battery:\ +Remove nvram battery: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0014.JPG) -Disconnect cable (for 56k modem) and disconnect the other cable:\ +Disconnect cable (for 56k modem) and disconnect the other cable: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0015.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0016.JPG) -Disconnect speaker cable:\ +Disconnect speaker cable: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0017.JPG) -Disconnect the other end of the 56k modem cable:\ +Disconnect the other end of the 56k modem cable: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0018.JPG) -Make sure you removed it:\ +Make sure you removed it: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0019.JPG) -Unscrew those:\ +Unscrew those: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0020.JPG) -Make sure you removed those:\ +Make sure you removed those: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0021.JPG) -Disconnect LCD cable from board:\ +Disconnect LCD cable from board: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0022.JPG) -Remove those screws then remove the LCD assembly:\ +Remove those screws then remove the LCD assembly: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0023.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0024.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0025.JPG) -Once again, make sure you removed those:\ +Once again, make sure you removed those: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0026.JPG) Remove the shielding containing the motherboard, then flip it over. @@ -124,20 +151,25 @@ Remove these screws, placing them on a steady surface in the same layout as they were in before you removed them. Also, you should mark each screw hole after removing the screw (a permanent marker pen will do), this is so that you have a point of reference when re-assembling the -system:\ +system: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0027.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0028.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0029.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0031.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0032.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0033.JPG) -Now wire up the BBB and the Pomona with your PSU.\ +Now wire up the BBB and the Pomona with your PSU. + Refer to [bbb\_setup.html](bbb_setup.html) for how to setup the BBB for -flashing.\ +flashing. + **Note, the guide mentions a 3.3v DC PSU but you don't need this on the T60: if you don't have or don't want to use an external PSU, then make sure not to connect the 3.3v leads mentioned in the guide; instead, connect the AC adapter (the one that normally charges your battery) so -that the board has power (but don't boot it up)**\ -![](../images/t60_dev/0030.JPG)\ +that the board has power (but don't boot it up)** + +![](../images/t60_dev/0030.JPG) + Correlate the following with the BBB guide linked above: POMONA 5250: @@ -156,7 +188,8 @@ Flashrom binaries for ARM (tested on a BBB) are distributed in libreboot\_util. Alternatively, libreboot also distributes flashrom source code which can be built. -SSH'd into the BBB:\ +SSH'd into the BBB: + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -w yourrom.rom** @@ -164,56 +197,69 @@ It should be **Verifying flash... VERIFIED** at the end. If flashrom complains about multiple flash chip definitions detected, then choose one of them following the instructions in the output. -Put those screws back:\ +Put those screws back: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0047.JPG) -Put it back into lower chassis:\ +Put it back into lower chassis: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0048.JPG) -Attach LCD and insert screws (also, attach the lcd cable to the board):\ +Attach LCD and insert screws (also, attach the lcd cable to the board): + ![](../images/t60_dev/0049.JPG) -Insert those screws:\ +Insert those screws: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0050.JPG) On the CPU (and there is another chip south-east to it, sorry forgot to take pic) clean off the old thermal paste (with the alcohol) and apply new (Artic Silver 5 is good, others are good too) you should also clean -the heatsink the same way\ +the heatsink the same way + ![](../images/t60_dev/0051.JPG) Attach the heatsink and install the screws (also, make sure to install -the AC jack as highlighted):\ +the AC jack as highlighted): + ![](../images/t60_dev/0052.JPG) -Reinstall that upper bezel:\ +Reinstall that upper bezel: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0053.JPG) -Do that:\ +Do that: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0054.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0055.JPG) Re-attach modem, wifi, (wwan?), and all necessary cables. Sorry, forgot to take pics. Look at previous removal steps to see where they go back to. -Attach keyboard and install nvram battery:\ +Attach keyboard and install nvram battery: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0056.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0057.JPG) Place keyboard and (sorry, forgot to take pics) reinstall the palmrest -and insert screws on the underside:\ +and insert screws on the underside: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0058.JPG) -It lives!\ +It lives! + ![](../images/t60_dev/0071.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0072.JPG) ![](../images/t60_dev/0073.JPG) Always stress test ('stress -c 2' and xsensors. below 90C is ok) when -replacing cpu paste/heatsink:\ +replacing cpu paste/heatsink: + ![](../images/t60_dev/0074.JPG) -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/x200_external.md b/docs/install/x200_external.md @@ -35,7 +35,8 @@ Check the [suppliers](../../suppliers) page for more information. Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ +Use this to find out: + # **flashrom -p internal -V** The X200S and X200 Tablet will use a WSON-8 flash chip, on the bottom of @@ -108,9 +109,12 @@ header), for SOIC-8 (clip: Pomona 5250): **On the X200S and X200 Tablet the flash chip is underneath the board, in a WSON package. The pinout is very much the same as a SOIC-8, except -you need to solder (there are no clips available).\ -The following image shows how this is done:**\ -![](images/x200/wson_soldered.jpg "Copyright 2014 Steve Shenton <sgsit@libreboot.org> see license notice at the end of this document")\ +you need to solder (there are no clips available). + +The following image shows how this is done:** + +![](images/x200/wson_soldered.jpg "Copyright 2014 Steve Shenton <sgsit@libreboot.org> see license notice at the end of this document") + In this image, a pin header was soldered onto the WSON. Another solution might be to de-solder the WSON-8 chip and put a SOIC-8 there instead. Check the list of SOIC-8 flash chips at @@ -126,39 +130,47 @@ This section is for the X200. This does not apply to the X200S or X200 Tablet (for those systems, you have to remove the motherboard completely, since the flash chip is on the other side of the board). -Remove these screws:\ +Remove these screws: + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0003.jpg) Push the keyboard forward, gently, then lift it off and disconnect it -from the board:\ +from the board: + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0004.jpg) ![](images/x200/disassembly/0005.jpg) Pull the palm rest off, lifting from the left and right side at the back -of the palm rest:\ +of the palm rest: + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0006.jpg) Lift back the tape that covers a part of the flash chip, and then -connect the clip:\ +connect the clip: + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0007.jpg) ![](images/x200/disassembly/0008.jpg) On pin 2 of the BBB, where you have the ground (GND), connect the ground -to your PSU:\ +to your PSU: + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0009.jpg) ![](images/x200/disassembly/0010.jpg) -Connect the 3.3V supply from your PSU to the flash chip (via the clip):\ +Connect the 3.3V supply from your PSU to the flash chip (via the clip): + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0011.jpg) ![](images/x200/disassembly/0012.jpg) -Of course, make sure that your PSU is also plugged in and turn on:\ +Of course, make sure that your PSU is also plugged in and turn on: + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0013.jpg) This tutorial tells you to use an ATX PSU, for the 3.3V DC supply. The PSU used when taking these photos is actually not an ATX PSU, but a PSU that is designed specifically for providing 3.3V DC (an ATX PSU will -also work):\ +also work): + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0014.jpg) Now, you should be ready to install libreboot. @@ -170,7 +182,8 @@ source code which can be built. Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). -Test that flashrom works:\ +Test that flashrom works: + # ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 In this case, the output was: @@ -184,17 +197,23 @@ In this case, the output was: Please specify which chip definition to use with the -c <chipname> option. How to backup factory.rom (change the -c option as neeed, for your flash -chip):\ +chip): + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory.rom**\ +factory.rom** + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory1.rom**\ +factory1.rom** + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -r -factory2.rom**\ +factory2.rom** + Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* -have been removed.\ -Now compare the 3 images:\ +have been removed. + +Now compare the 3 images: + # sha512sum factory*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This @@ -209,7 +228,8 @@ flashing it. Although there is a default MAC address inside the ROM image, this is not what you want. **Make sure to always change the MAC address to one that is correct for your system.** -Now flash it:\ +Now flash it: + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -w path/to/libreboot/rom/image.rom -V** @@ -255,7 +275,8 @@ whitelist of approved chips, and it will refuse to boot if you use an 'unauthorized' wifi card. The following photos show an Atheros AR5B95 being installed, to replace -the Intel chip that this X200 came with:\ +the Intel chip that this X200 came with: + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0016.jpg) ![](images/x200/disassembly/0017.jpg) @@ -285,7 +306,8 @@ work in some cases. Make sure that the RAM you buy is the 2Rx8 density. -In this photo, 8GiB of RAM (2x4GiB) is installed:\ +In this photo, 8GiB of RAM (2x4GiB) is installed: + ![](images/x200/disassembly/0018.jpg) @@ -309,7 +331,8 @@ disable the flashing protections by the descriptor and stop the ME from starting (which itself interferes with flashing attempts). The theory was proven correct; however, it is still useless in practise. -Look just above the 7 in TP37 (that's GPIO33):\ +Look just above the 7 in TP37 (that's GPIO33): + ![](../hcl/images/x200/gpio33_location.jpg) By default we would see this in lenovobios, when trying flashrom -p @@ -344,7 +367,8 @@ investigating this: -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/x60_unbrick.md b/docs/install/x60_unbrick.md @@ -24,22 +24,31 @@ Brick type 1: bucts not reset. {#bucts_brick} You still have Lenovo BIOS, or you had libreboot running and you flashed another ROM; and you had bucts 1 set and the ROM wasn't dd'd.* or if -Lenovo BIOS was present and libreboot wasn't flashed.\ -\ +Lenovo BIOS was present and libreboot wasn't flashed. + + + In this case, unbricking is easy: reset BUC.TS to 0 by removing that yellow cmos coin (it's a battery) and putting it back after a minute or -two:\ -![](../images/x60_unbrick/0004.jpg)\ -\ +two: + +![](../images/x60_unbrick/0004.jpg) + + + *Those dd commands should be applied to all newly compiled X60 ROM images (the ROM images in libreboot binary archives already have this -applied!):\ +applied!): + dd if=coreboot.rom of=top64k.bin bs=1 skip=$\[$(stat -c %s -coreboot.rom) - 0x10000\] count=64k\ +coreboot.rom) - 0x10000\] count=64k + dd if=coreboot.rom bs=1 skip=$\[$(stat -c %s coreboot.rom) - 0x20000\] -count=64k | hexdump\ +count=64k | hexdump + dd if=top64k.bin of=coreboot.rom bs=1 seek=$\[$(stat -c %s -coreboot.rom) - 0x20000\] count=64k conv=notrunc\ +coreboot.rom) - 0x20000\] count=64k conv=notrunc + (doing this makes the ROM suitable for use when flashing a system that still has Lenovo BIOS running, using those instructions: <http://www.coreboot.org/Board:lenovo/x60/Installation>. @@ -60,68 +69,86 @@ you can't boot the system, making this difficult. In this situation, external hardware (see hardware requirements above) is needed which can flash the SPI chip (where libreboot resides). -Remove those screws:\ +Remove those screws: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0000.jpg) -Push the keyboard forward (carefully):\ +Push the keyboard forward (carefully): + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0001.jpg) -Lift the keyboard up and disconnect it from the board:\ +Lift the keyboard up and disconnect it from the board: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0002.jpg) Grab the right-hand side of the chassis and force it off (gently) and -pry up the rest of the chassis:\ +pry up the rest of the chassis: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0003.jpg) -You should now have this:\ +You should now have this: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0004.jpg) -Disconnect the wifi antenna cables, the modem cable and the speaker:\ +Disconnect the wifi antenna cables, the modem cable and the speaker: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0005.jpg) Unroute the cables along their path, carefully lifting the tape that holds them in place. Then, disconnect the modem cable (other end) and power connection and unroute all the cables so that they dangle by the -monitor hinge on the right-hand side:\ +monitor hinge on the right-hand side: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0006.jpg) Disconnect the monitor from the motherboard, and unroute the grey -antenna cable, carefully lifting the tape that holds it into place:\ +antenna cable, carefully lifting the tape that holds it into place: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0008.jpg) Carefully lift the remaining tape and unroute the left antenna cable so -that it is loose:\ +that it is loose: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0009.jpg) Remove the screw that is highlighted (do NOT remove the other one; it -holds part of the heatsink (other side) into place):\ +holds part of the heatsink (other side) into place): + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0011.jpg) -Remove those screws:\ +Remove those screws: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0012.jpg) -Carefully remove the plate, like so:\ +Carefully remove the plate, like so: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0013.jpg) -Remove the SATA connector:\ +Remove the SATA connector: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0014.jpg) -Now remove the motherboard (gently) and cast the lcd/chassis aside:\ +Now remove the motherboard (gently) and cast the lcd/chassis aside: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0015.jpg) Lift back that tape and hold it with something. Highlighted is the SPI -flash chip:\ +flash chip: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0016.jpg) -Now wire up the BBB and the Pomona with your PSU.\ +Now wire up the BBB and the Pomona with your PSU. + Refer to [bbb\_setup.html](bbb_setup.html) for how to setup the BBB for -flashing.\ +flashing. + **Note, the guide mentions a 3.3v DC PSU but you don't need this on the X60: if you don't have or don't want to use an external PSU, then make sure not to connect the 3.3v leads mentioned in the guide; instead, connect the AC adapter (the one that normally charges your battery) so that the board has power (but don't boot it up)** -![](../images/x60_unbrick/0017.jpg)\ +![](../images/x60_unbrick/0017.jpg) + Correlate the following with the BBB guide linked above: POMONA 5250: @@ -134,14 +161,16 @@ Correlate the following with the BBB guide linked above: This is how you will connect. Numbers refer to pin numbers on the BBB, on the plugs near the DC jack. Connecting the BBB and pomona (in this image, an external 3.3v DC PSU -was used):\ +was used): + ![](images/x60/th_bbb_flashing.jpg) Flashrom binaries for ARM (tested on a BBB) are distributed in libreboot\_util. Alternatively, libreboot also distributes flashrom source code which can be built. -SSH'd into the BBB:\ +SSH'd into the BBB: + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -w yourrom.rom** @@ -150,82 +179,106 @@ complains about multiple flash chip definitions detected, then choose one of them following the instructions in the output. Remove the programmer and put it away somewhere. Put back the tape and -press firmly over it:\ +press firmly over it: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0026.jpg) -Your empty chassis:\ +Your empty chassis: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0027.jpg) -Put the motherboard back in:\ +Put the motherboard back in: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0028.jpg) -Reconnect SATA:\ +Reconnect SATA: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0029.jpg) -Put the plate back and re-insert those screws:\ +Put the plate back and re-insert those screws: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0030.jpg) -Re-route that antenna cable around the fan and apply the tape:\ +Re-route that antenna cable around the fan and apply the tape: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0031.jpg) Route the cable here and then (not shown, due to error on my part) reconnect the monitor cable to the motherboard and re-insert the -screws:\ +screws: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0032.jpg) -Re-insert that screw:\ +Re-insert that screw: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0033.jpg) -Route the black antenna cable like so:\ +Route the black antenna cable like so: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0034.jpg) -Tuck it in neatly like so:\ +Tuck it in neatly like so: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0035.jpg) -Route the modem cable like so:\ +Route the modem cable like so: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0036.jpg) -Connect modem cable to board and tuck it in neatly like so:\ +Connect modem cable to board and tuck it in neatly like so: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0037.jpg) -Route the power connection and connect it to the board like so:\ +Route the power connection and connect it to the board like so: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0038.jpg) -Route the antenna and modem cables neatly like so:\ +Route the antenna and modem cables neatly like so: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0039.jpg) Connect the wifi antenna cables. At the start of the tutorial, this system had an Intel wifi chip. Here you see I've replaced it with an -Atheros AR5B95 (supports 802.11n and can be used without blobs):\ +Atheros AR5B95 (supports 802.11n and can be used without blobs): + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0040.jpg) -Connect the modem cable:\ +Connect the modem cable: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0041.jpg) -Connect the speaker:\ +Connect the speaker: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0042.jpg) -You should now have this:\ +You should now have this: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0043.jpg) -Re-connect the upper chassis:\ +Re-connect the upper chassis: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0044.jpg) -Re-connect the keyboard:\ +Re-connect the keyboard: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0045.jpg) -Re-insert the screws that you removed earlier:\ +Re-insert the screws that you removed earlier: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0046.jpg) -Power on!\ +Power on! + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0047.jpg) -Operating system:\ +Operating system: + ![](../images/x60_unbrick/0049.jpg) -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/install/x60tablet_unbrick.md b/docs/install/x60tablet_unbrick.md @@ -24,22 +24,31 @@ Brick type 1: bucts not reset. {#bucts_brick} You still have Lenovo BIOS, or you had libreboot running and you flashed another ROM; and you had bucts 1 set and the ROM wasn't dd'd.* or if -Lenovo BIOS was present and libreboot wasn't flashed.\ -\ +Lenovo BIOS was present and libreboot wasn't flashed. + + + In this case, unbricking is easy: reset BUC.TS to 0 by removing that yellow cmos coin (it's a battery) and putting it back after a minute or -two:\ -![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0008.JPG)\ -\ +two: + +![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0008.JPG) + + + *Those dd commands should be applied to all newly compiled X60 ROM images (the ROM images in libreboot binary archives already have this -applied!):\ +applied!): + dd if=coreboot.rom of=top64k.bin bs=1 skip=$\[$(stat -c %s -coreboot.rom) - 0x10000\] count=64k\ +coreboot.rom) - 0x10000\] count=64k + dd if=coreboot.rom bs=1 skip=$\[$(stat -c %s coreboot.rom) - 0x20000\] -count=64k | hexdump\ +count=64k | hexdump + dd if=top64k.bin of=coreboot.rom bs=1 seek=$\[$(stat -c %s -coreboot.rom) - 0x20000\] count=64k conv=notrunc\ +coreboot.rom) - 0x20000\] count=64k conv=notrunc + (doing this makes the ROM suitable for use when flashing a system that still has Lenovo BIOS running, using those instructions: <http://www.coreboot.org/Board:lenovo/x60/Installation>. @@ -62,45 +71,57 @@ flash the SPI chip (where libreboot resides). ![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0000.JPG) -Remove those screws:\ +Remove those screws: + ![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0001.JPG) -Remove the HDD:\ +Remove the HDD: + ![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0002.JPG) -Push keyboard forward to loosen it:\ +Push keyboard forward to loosen it: + ![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0003.JPG) -Lift:\ +Lift: + ![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0004.JPG) -Remove those:\ +Remove those: + ![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0005.JPG) ![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0006.JPG) -Also remove that (marked) and unroute the antenna cables:\ +Also remove that (marked) and unroute the antenna cables: + ![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0007.JPG) -For some X60T laptops, you have to unroute those too:\ +For some X60T laptops, you have to unroute those too: + ![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0010.JPG) Remove the LCD extend board screws. Also remove those screws (see blue -marks) and remove/unroute the cables and remove the metal plate:\ +marks) and remove/unroute the cables and remove the metal plate: + ![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0008.JPG) -Remove that screw and then remove the board:\ +Remove that screw and then remove the board: + ![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0009.JPG) -Now wire up the BBB and the Pomona with your PSU.\ +Now wire up the BBB and the Pomona with your PSU. + Refer to [bbb\_setup.html](bbb_setup.html) for how to setup the BBB for -flashing.\ +flashing. + **Note, the guide mentions a 3.3v DC PSU but you don't need this on the X60 Tablet: if you don't have or don't want to use an external PSU, then make sure not to connect the 3.3v leads mentioned in the guide; instead, connect the AC adapter (the one that normally charges your battery) so that the board has power (but don't boot it up)** -![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0011.JPG)\ +![](../images/x60t_unbrick/0011.JPG) + Correlate the following with the BBB guide linked above: POMONA 5250: @@ -113,14 +134,16 @@ Correlate the following with the BBB guide linked above: This is how you will connect. Numbers refer to pin numbers on the BBB, on the plugs near the DC jack. Connecting the BBB and pomona (in this image, an external 3.3v DC PSU -was used):\ +was used): + ![](images/x60/th_bbb_flashing.jpg) Flashrom binaries for ARM (tested on a BBB) are distributed in libreboot\_util. Alternatively, libreboot also distributes flashrom source code which can be built. -SSH'd into the BBB:\ +SSH'd into the BBB: + # **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 -w yourrom.rom** @@ -132,7 +155,8 @@ Reverse the steps to re-assemble your system. -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/misc/bbb_ehci.md b/docs/misc/bbb_ehci.md @@ -126,7 +126,8 @@ next step. ### Patch BBB's g\_dbgp module (optional, but highly recommended) {#PatchBBBsgdbgpmoduleoptionalbuthighlyrecommended} For the reasons why you need this, see: [EHCI Gadget -Debug](http://www.coreboot.org/EHCI_Gadget_Debug).\ +Debug](http://www.coreboot.org/EHCI_Gadget_Debug). + Make sure that you have cross compiling environment for arm-linux-gnueabihf setup on your *host*. @@ -198,7 +199,8 @@ arm-linux-gnueabihf setup on your *host*. ### Configure libreboot with EHCI debug {#ConfigurelibrebootwithEHCIdebug} Libreboot(coreboot) should be configured with debug turned on and to -push debug messages to the EHCI debug port.\ +push debug messages to the EHCI debug port. + If you've downloaded the binary distribution, you can check if it is properly configured in the following way: @@ -234,7 +236,8 @@ documented [here](https://johnlewis.ie/coreboot-ehci-debug-gadget-demonstration/) (also tested/verified). -Then:\ +Then: + CONFIG_CONSOLE_USB=y (Console -> USB dongle console output) @@ -255,7 +258,8 @@ refer to the doc(**FIXME: link** about compiling libreboot. #### Selecting HCD Index and USB Debug port {#SelectingHCDIndexandUSBDebugport} This applies (and works) only if the USB controller that supports debug -(found in the first section) is from Intel.\ +(found in the first section) is from Intel. + If the PCI ID of the port you found in the first section is 0000:00:1a.0 or 0000:00:1d.0 , you are ok. Otherwise you have to try without guarantee that will work. @@ -266,10 +270,12 @@ then for CONFIG\_USBDEBUG\_HCD\_INDEX choose 2, otherwise choose 0 . For CONFIG\_USBDEBUG\_DEFAULT\_PORT choose the port from the first section that correspond to the PCI ID -Notes:\ +Notes: + The above is based on the implementation of coreboot/src/southbridge/intel/common/usb\_debug.c : -pci\_ehci\_dbg\_dev() .\ +pci\_ehci\_dbg\_dev() . + This is enough as it applies for the supported GM45/G45 Thinkpads. coreboot support some other contollers too, but they are irellevent for libreboot (for now). @@ -356,7 +362,8 @@ Interface](http://cs.usfca.edu/~cruse/cs698s10/) -Copyright © 2015 Alex David <opdecirkel@gmail.com>\ +Copyright © 2015 Alex David <opdecirkel@gmail.com> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/misc/index.md b/docs/misc/index.md @@ -58,10 +58,12 @@ On the X60 with coreboot or libreboot, there is a high pitched sound when idle. So far we have use processor.max\_cstate=2 or idle=halt in GRUB. These consume power. Stop using them! -Be root\ +Be root + $ su - -Installed powertop:\ +Installed powertop: + # pacman -S powertop and added the following to /etc/systemd/system/powertop.service : @@ -79,7 +81,8 @@ and added the following to /etc/systemd/system/powertop.service : [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target -Finally, as root do that:\ +Finally, as root do that: + # systemctl enable powertop # systemctl start powertop @@ -107,7 +110,8 @@ included inside the ROM. Connect your null modem cable to the serial port on the dock and connect the other end to a 2nd system using your USB Serial adapter. -On the 2nd system, you can try this (using GNU Screen):\ +On the 2nd system, you can try this (using GNU Screen): + $ sudo screen /dev/ttyUSB0 115200 How to quit GNU Screen: Ctrl+A then release and press K, and then press @@ -122,7 +126,8 @@ can also configure your distro so that a terminal (TTY) is accessible from the serial console. The following guide is for Ubuntu, but it should work in Debian and -Devuan, to enable a serial console using GeTTY:\ +Devuan, to enable a serial console using GeTTY: + <https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SerialConsoleHowto> (we DO NOT recommend Ubuntu, because it contains non-free software in the default repos. Use Debian or Devuan) @@ -226,11 +231,13 @@ battery goes to a critically low charge level, a beep occurs. Nvramtool is included in libreboot, and can be used to enable or disable this behaviour. -Disable or enable beeps when removing/adding the charger:\ +Disable or enable beeps when removing/adding the charger: + $ sudo ./nvramtool -w power\_management\_beeps=Enable $ **sudo ./nvramtool -w power\_management\_beeps=Disable** -Disable or enable beeps when battery is low:\ +Disable or enable beeps when battery is low: + $ sudo ./nvramtool -w low\_battery\_beep=Enable $ **sudo ./nvramtool -w low\_battery\_beep=Disable** @@ -245,10 +252,12 @@ Get the panel name with sudo get-edid | strings Or look in **/sys/class/drm/card0-LVDS-1/edid** Alternatively you can use i2cdump. In Debian and Devuan, this is in the -package i2c-tools.\ +package i2c-tools. + $ sudo modprobe i2c-dev $ **sudo i2cdump -y 5 0x50** (you might have to change the value for --y)\ +-y) + $ sudo rmmod i2c-dev You'll see the panel name in the output (from the EDID dump). @@ -268,14 +277,16 @@ needed for cause): e1000e 0000:00:19.0 enp0s25: Detected Hardware Unit Hang -Possible workaround, tested by Nazara: Disable C-STATES.\ +Possible workaround, tested by Nazara: Disable C-STATES. + **NOTE: this also disables power management, because disabling C-States means that your CPU will now be running at full capacity (and therefore using more power) non-stop, which will drain battery life if this is a laptop. If power usage is a concern, then you should not use this. (we're also not sure whether this workaround is appropriate)** -To disable c-states, do this in GNU+Linux:\ +To disable c-states, do this in GNU+Linux: + **for i in /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu/cpuidle/state/disable; do echo 1 > $i; done** @@ -296,7 +307,8 @@ Put this script in /etc/init.d/ on debian-based systems. -Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/misc/patch.md b/docs/misc/patch.md @@ -11,11 +11,13 @@ This is just a quick guide for reference, use 'man' to know more. Apply a patch ============= -To apply a patch to a single file, do that in it's directory:\ +To apply a patch to a single file, do that in it's directory: + $ patch < foo.patch Assuming that the patch is distributed in unified format identifying the -file the patch should be applied to, the above will work. Otherwise:\ +file the patch should be applied to, the above will work. Otherwise: + $ patch foo.txt < bar.patch You can apply a patch to an entire directory, but note the "p level". @@ -24,22 +26,26 @@ intend to patch, identified by path names that might be different when the files ane located on your own computer instead of on the computer where the patch was created. 'p' level instructs the 'patch' utility to ignore parts of the path name to identify the files correctly. -Usually a p level of 1 will work, so you would use:\ +Usually a p level of 1 will work, so you would use: + $ patch -p1 < baz.patch Change to the top level directory before running this. If a patch level of 1 cannot identify the files to patch, then inspect the patch file for -file names. For example:\ +file names. For example: + **/home/user/do/not/panic/yet.c** -and you are working in a directory that contains panic/yet.c, use:\ +and you are working in a directory that contains panic/yet.c, use: + $ patch -p5 < baz.patch You usually count one up for each path separator (forward slash) removed from the beginning of the path, until you are left with a path that exists in the current working directory. The count is the p level. -Removing a patch using the -R flag\ +Removing a patch using the -R flag + $ patch -p5 -R < baz.patch [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -49,13 +55,16 @@ Removing a patch using the -R flag\ Create a patch with diff ======================== -Diff can create a patch for a single file:\ +Diff can create a patch for a single file: + $ diff -u original.c new.c > original.patch -For diff'ing a source tree:\ +For diff'ing a source tree: + $ cp -R original new -Do whatever you want in new/ and then diff it:\ +Do whatever you want in new/ and then diff it: + $ diff -rupN original/ new/ > original.patch [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -69,13 +78,16 @@ git is something special. Note: this won't show new files created. -Just make whatever changes you want to a git clone and then:\ +Just make whatever changes you want to a git clone and then: + $ git diff > patch.git -Note the git revision that you did this with:\ +Note the git revision that you did this with: + $ git log -Alternatively (better yet), commit your changes and then use:\ +Alternatively (better yet), commit your changes and then use: + $ git format-patch -N Replace N with the number of commits that you want to show. @@ -89,10 +101,12 @@ git apply it really is. Now to apply that patch in the future, just git clone it again and do -with the git revision you found from above:\ +with the git revision you found from above: + $ git reset \--hard REVISIONNUMBER -Now put patch.git in the git clone directory and do:\ +Now put patch.git in the git clone directory and do: + $ git apply patch.git If you use a patch from git format-patch, then use **git am patch.git** @@ -103,7 +117,8 @@ aswell, instead of just applying the patch. -Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative diff --git a/docs/release.md b/docs/release.md @@ -210,7 +210,8 @@ now set correctly in the descriptor, gbe-less descriptors now supported) -Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>\ +Copyright © 2014, 2015, 2016 Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org> + Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license or any later version published by Creative