libreboot

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commit 29610c6f3b1b1e78ae7cec11b41368fe9d76c6ed
parent 556205fc197ee1ef0f77ed382ac9f9ec57068ccf
Author: Alyssa Rosenzweig <alyssa@rosenzweig.io>
Date:   Fri, 17 Mar 2017 23:04:16 -0700

Begin descent from weird command line syntax

Diffstat:
docs/bsd/freebsd.md | 16++++++++--------
docs/bsd/netbsd.md | 16++++++++--------
docs/bsd/openbsd.md | 16++++++++--------
docs/future/index.md | 6+++---
docs/git/index.md | 28++++++++++++++--------------
docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md | 50+++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------------------
docs/gnulinux/encrypted_debian.md | 10+++++-----
docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md | 116++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++----------------------------------------
docs/gnulinux/grub_boot_installer.md | 26+++++++++++++-------------
docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md | 8++++----
docs/grub/index.md | 4++--
docs/hardware/t60_security.md | 4++--
docs/hardware/x60_security.md | 2+-
docs/hcl/gm45_remove_me.md | 6+++---
docs/hcl/index.md | 2+-
docs/hcl/t500.md | 2+-
docs/index.md | 6+++---
docs/install/bbb_setup.md | 12++++++------
docs/install/c201.md | 16++++++++--------
docs/install/index.md | 2+-
docs/install/r400_external.md | 6+++---
docs/install/t400_external.md | 4++--
docs/install/t500_external.md | 4++--
docs/install/x200_external.md | 4++--
docs/misc/index.md | 12++++++------
docs/misc/patch.md | 2+-
26 files changed, 190 insertions(+), 190 deletions(-)

diff --git a/docs/bsd/freebsd.md b/docs/bsd/freebsd.md @@ -62,17 +62,17 @@ If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or OpenBSD system, here is how to create the bootable FreeBSD USB drive: Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**$ dmesg | tail**\ + $ dmesg | tail Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ **$ disklabel sd3** Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For example:\ -**$ doas umount /dev/sd3i**\ + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the FreeBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ -**$ doas dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync**\ + $ doas dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -85,18 +85,18 @@ If you downloaded your ISO on a GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable FreeBSD USB drive: Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**$ dmesg**\ + $ dmesg Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ **$ lsblk** Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For example:\ -**$ sudo umount /dev/sdX***\ + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX* **\# umount /dev/sdX*** dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ -**$ sudo dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync**\ + $ sudo dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync **\# dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync** You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. @@ -110,8 +110,8 @@ Installing FreeBSD without full disk encryption Press C in GRUB to access the command line: -grub> **kfreebsd (usb0,gpt3)/boot/kernel/kernel**\ -grub> **set FreeBSD.vfs.mountfrom=ufs:/dev/da1p3**\ +grub> kfreebsd (usb0,gpt3)/boot/kernel/kernel +grub> set FreeBSD.vfs.mountfrom=ufs:/dev/da1p3 grub> **boot** It will start booting into the FreeBSD installer. Follow the normal diff --git a/docs/bsd/netbsd.md b/docs/bsd/netbsd.md @@ -58,17 +58,17 @@ If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or NetBSD system, here is how to create the bootable NetBSD USB drive: Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**$ dmesg | tail**\ + $ dmesg | tail Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ **$ disklabel sd3** Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For example:\ -**$ doas umount /dev/sd3i**\ + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the NetBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ -**$ doas netbsd.iso of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync**\ + $ doas netbsd.iso of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -81,18 +81,18 @@ If you downloaded your ISO on a GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable NetBSD USB drive: Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**$ dmesg**\ + $ dmesg Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ **$ lsblk** Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For example:\ -**$ sudo umount /dev/sdX***\ + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX* **\# umount /dev/sdX*** dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ -**$ sudo dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync**\ + $ sudo dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync **\# dd if=netbsd.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync** You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. @@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ Installing NetBSD without full disk encryption You might have to use an external USB keyboard during the installation. Press C to access the GRUB terminal. -grub> **knetbsd -r sd0a (usb0,netbsd1)/netbsd**\ +grub> knetbsd -r sd0a (usb0,netbsd1)/netbsd grub> **boot** It will start booting into the NetBSD installer. Follow the normal @@ -129,7 +129,7 @@ Booting Press C in GRUB to access the command line: -grub> **knetbsd -r wd0a (ahci0,netbsd1)/netbsd**\ +grub> knetbsd -r wd0a (ahci0,netbsd1)/netbsd grub> **boot** NetBSD will start booting. Yay! diff --git a/docs/bsd/openbsd.md b/docs/bsd/openbsd.md @@ -40,17 +40,17 @@ If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or OpenBSD system, here is how to create the bootable LibertyBSD/OpenBSD USB drive: Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**$ dmesg | tail**\ + $ dmesg | tail Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ **$ disklabel sd3** Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For example:\ -**$ doas umount /dev/sd3i**\ + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the OpenBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ -**$ doas dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync**\ + $ doas dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -80,18 +80,18 @@ If you downloaded your ISO on a GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable OpenBSD USB drive: Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**$ dmesg**\ + $ dmesg Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ **$ lsblk** Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For example:\ -**$ sudo umount /dev/sdX***\ + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX* **\# umount /dev/sdX*** dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ -**$ sudo dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync**\ + $ sudo dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync **\# dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync** You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. @@ -105,7 +105,7 @@ Installing OpenBSD without full disk encryption Press C in GRUB to access the command line: -grub> **kopenbsd (usb0,openbsd1)/6.0/amd64/bsd.rd**\ +grub> kopenbsd (usb0,openbsd1)/6.0/amd64/bsd.rd grub> **boot** It will start booting into the OpenBSD installer. Follow the normal @@ -150,7 +150,7 @@ Booting Press C in GRUB to access the command line: -grub> **kopenbsd -r sd0a (ahci0,openbsd1)/bsd**\ +grub> kopenbsd -r sd0a (ahci0,openbsd1)/bsd grub> **boot** OpenBSD will start booting. Yay! diff --git a/docs/future/index.md b/docs/future/index.md @@ -160,10 +160,10 @@ working and nonworking panels. How to dump EDID: -\# **apt-get install i2c-tools**\ -\# **modprobe i2c-dev**\ +\# apt-get install i2c-tools +\# modprobe i2c-dev Find out the correct ID to use:\ -\# **i2cdetect -l**\ +\# i2cdetect -l Example:\ \# **i2cdump -y 2 0x50** diff --git a/docs/git/index.md b/docs/git/index.md @@ -33,11 +33,11 @@ statically compiled executables for the utilities are included.** For Debian Stretch (may also work on Debian Jessie), you can run the following command:\ -$ **sudo ./oldbuild dependencies debian**\ +$ sudo ./oldbuild dependencies debian (this will also work in Devuan) For Parabola, you can run the following command:\ -$ **sudo ./oldbuild dependencies parabola**\ +$ sudo ./oldbuild dependencies parabola or:\ \# **./oldbuild dependencies parabola** @@ -63,17 +63,17 @@ First, [install the build dependencies](#build_dependencies). Since libreboot makes extensive use of git, you need to configure git properly. If you have not yet configured git, then the minimum requirement is:\ -$ **git config \--global user.name "Your Name"**\ -$ **git config \--global user.email your@emailaddress.com**\ +$ git config \--global user.name "Your Name" +$ git config \--global user.email your@emailaddress.com This is what will also appear in git logs if you ever commit your own changes to a given repository. For more information, see <http://git-scm.com/doc>. Another nice config for you (optional, but recommended):\ -$ **git config \--global core.editor nano**\ -$ **git config \--global color.status auto**\ -$ **git config \--global color.branch auto**\ -$ **git config \--global color.interactive auto**\ +$ git config \--global core.editor nano +$ git config \--global color.status auto +$ git config \--global color.branch auto +$ git config \--global color.interactive auto $ **git config \--global color.diff auto** After that, run the script:\ @@ -221,12 +221,12 @@ modulename*. To see the possible values for *modulename*, use:\ $ **./oldbuild module list** After that, build the ROM images (for all boards):\ -$ **./oldbuild roms withgrub**\ +$ ./oldbuild roms withgrub Alternatively, you can build for a specific board or set of boards. For example:\ -$ **./oldbuild roms withgrub x60**\ -$ **./oldbuild roms withgrub x200\_8mb**\ -$ **./oldbuild roms withgrub x60 x200\_8mb**\ +$ ./oldbuild roms withgrub x60 +$ ./oldbuild roms withgrub x200\_8mb +$ ./oldbuild roms withgrub x60 x200\_8mb The list of board options can be found by looking at the directory names in **resources/libreboot/config/grub/**. @@ -304,7 +304,7 @@ libreboot\_util, for: If you are building binaries on a live system or chroot (for flashrom/bucts), you can use the following to statically link them:\ -$ **./oldbuild module flashrom static**\ +$ ./oldbuild module flashrom static $ **./oldbuild module bucts static** The same conditions as above apply for ARM (except, building bucts on @@ -315,7 +315,7 @@ restrictions). The command that you used for generating the release archives will also run the following command:\ -$ **./oldbuild release tobuild**\ +$ ./oldbuild release tobuild The archive **tobuild.tar.xz** will have been created under **release/oldbuildsystem/**, containing bucts, flashrom and all other required resources for building them. diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md b/docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md @@ -97,9 +97,9 @@ careful about this when reading anything on the Arch wiki. Some of these steps require internet access. I'll go into networking later but for now, I just connected my system to a switch and did:\ -\# **systemctl start dhcpcd.service**\ +\# systemctl start dhcpcd.service You can stop it later by running:\ -\# **systemctl stop dhcpcd.service**\ +\# systemctl stop dhcpcd.service For most people this should be enough, but if you don't have DHCP on your network then you should setup your network connection first:\ [Setup network connection in Parabola](#network) @@ -129,7 +129,7 @@ Updating Parabola {#pacman_update} In the end, I didn't change my configuration for pacman. When you are updating, resync with the latest package names/versions:\ -\# **pacman -Syy**\ +\# pacman -Syy (according to the wiki, -Syy is better than Sy because it refreshes the package list even if it appears to be up to date, which can be useful when switching to another mirror).\ @@ -208,7 +208,7 @@ caches available. Only do this if you are sure that you won't need it. The wiki also mentions this method for removing everything from the cache, including currently installed packages that are cached:\ -\# **pacman -Scc**\ +\# pacman -Scc This is inadvisable, since it means re-downloading the package again if you wanted to quickly re-install it. This should only be used when disk space is at a premium. @@ -254,7 +254,7 @@ access to the entire operating system. Read the entire document linked to above, and then continue. Add your user:\ -\# **useradd -m -G wheel -s /bin/bash *yourusername***\ +\# useradd -m -G wheel -s /bin/bash *yourusername* Set a password:\ \# **passwd *yourusername*** @@ -282,7 +282,7 @@ the background behind the decision by Arch (Parabola's upstream supplier) to use systemd. The manpage should also help:\ -\# **man systemd**\ +\# man systemd The section on 'unit types' is especially useful. According to the wiki, systemd 'journal' keeps logs of a size up to @@ -313,9 +313,9 @@ delete older records when the journal size reaches it's limit Finally, the wiki mentions 'temporary' files and the utility for managing them.\ -\# **man systemd-tmpfiles**\ +\# man systemd-tmpfiles The command for 'clean' is:\ -\# **systemd-tmpfiles \--clean**\ +\# systemd-tmpfiles \--clean According to the manpage, this *"cleans all files and directories with an age parameter"*. According to the Arch wiki, this reads information in /etc/tmpfiles.d/ and /usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/ to know what actions to @@ -325,7 +325,7 @@ locations to get a better understanding. I looked in /etc/tmpfiles.d/ and found that it was empty on my system. However, /usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/ contained some files. The first one was etc.conf, containing information and a reference to this manpage:\ -\# **man tmpfiles.d**\ +\# man tmpfiles.d Read that manpage, and then continue studying all the files. The systemd developers tell me that it isn't usually necessary to touch @@ -373,11 +373,11 @@ Read <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Configuring_Network>. This should be the same as the hostname that you set in /etc/hostname when installing Parabola. You can also do it with systemd (do so now, if you like):\ -\# **hostnamectl set-hostname *yourhostname***\ +\# hostnamectl set-hostname *yourhostname* This writes the specified hostname to /etc/hostname. More information can be found in these manpages:\ -\# **man hostname**\ -\# **info hostname**\ +\# man hostname +\# info hostname \# **man hostnamectl** Add the same hostname to /etc/hosts, on each line. Example:\ @@ -463,7 +463,7 @@ is important, so make sure to read them!** Install smartmontools (it can be used to check smart data. HDDs use non-free firmware inside, but it's transparent to you but the smart data comes from it. Therefore, don't rely on it too much):\ -\# **pacman -S smartmontools**\ +\# pacman -S smartmontools Read <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/S.M.A.R.T.> to learn how to use it. @@ -488,23 +488,23 @@ provide LXDE by default. Based on <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Xorg>. Firstly, install it!\ -\# **pacman -S xorg-server**\ +\# pacman -S xorg-server I also recommend installing this (contains lots of useful tools, including *xrandr*):\ \# **pacman -S xorg-server-utils** Install the driver. For me this was *xf86-video-intel* on the ThinkPad X60. T60 and macbook11/21 should be the same.\ -\# **pacman -S xf86-video-intel**\ +\# pacman -S xf86-video-intel For other systems you can try:\ -\# **pacman -Ss xf86-video- | less**\ +\# pacman -Ss xf86-video- | less Combined with looking at your *lspci* output, you can determine which driver is needed. By default, Xorg will revert to xf86-video-vesa which is a generic driver and doesn't provide true hardware acceleration. Other drivers (not just video) can be found by looking at the *xorg-drivers* group:\ -\# **pacman -Sg xorg-drivers**\ +\# pacman -Sg xorg-drivers Mostly you will rely on a display manager, but in case you ever want to start X without one:\ @@ -512,9 +512,9 @@ start X without one:\ <optional>\    Arch wiki recommends installing these, for testing that X works:\ -   \# **pacman -S xorg-twm xorg-xclock xterm**\ +   \# pacman -S xorg-twm xorg-xclock xterm    Refer to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Xinitrc>. and test X:\ -   \# **startx**\ +   \# startx    When you are satisfied, type ***exit*** in xterm, inside the X session.\    Uninstall them (clutter. eww): \# **pacman -S xorg-xinit xorg-twm @@ -601,7 +601,7 @@ I also like to install these:\ \# **pacman -S xsensors stress htop** Enable LXDM (the default display manager, providing a graphical login):\ -\# **systemctl enable lxdm.service**\ +\# systemctl enable lxdm.service It will start when you boot up the system. To start it now, do:\ \# **systemctl start lxdm.service** @@ -611,7 +611,7 @@ start lxde without lxdm. Read <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Xinitrc>. Open LXterminal:\ -$ **cp /etc/skel/.xinitrc \~**\ +$ cp /etc/skel/.xinitrc \~ Open .xinitrc and add the following plus a line break at the bottom of the file.\ *\# Probably not needed. The same locale info that we set before\ @@ -702,7 +702,7 @@ Install Network Manager:\ \# **pacman -S networkmanager** You will also want the graphical applet:\ -\# **pacman -S network-manager-applet**\ +\# pacman -S network-manager-applet Arch wiki says that an autostart rule will be written at */etc/xdg/autostart/nm-applet.desktop* @@ -714,13 +714,13 @@ LXDE uses openbox, so I refer to:\ <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/NetworkManager#Openbox>. It tells me for the applet I need:\ -\# **pacman -S xfce4-notifyd gnome-icon-theme**\ +\# pacman -S xfce4-notifyd gnome-icon-theme Also, for storing authentication details (wifi) I need:\ \# **pacman -S gnome-keyring** I wanted to quickly enable networkmanager:\ -\# **systemctl stop dhcpcd**\ -\# **systemctl start NetworkManager**\ +\# systemctl stop dhcpcd +\# systemctl start NetworkManager Enable NetworkManager at boot time:\ \# **systemctl enable NetworkManager** diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_debian.md b/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_debian.md @@ -187,11 +187,11 @@ At this point, you will have finished the installation. At your GRUB payload, press C to get to the command line. Do that:\ -grub> **cryptomount -a**\ -grub> **set root='lvm/matrix-rootvol'**\ +grub> cryptomount -a +grub> set root='lvm/matrix-rootvol' grub> **linux /vmlinuz root=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol cryptdevice=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol:root**\ -grub> **initrd /initrd.img**\ +grub> initrd /initrd.img grub> **boot** @@ -222,8 +222,8 @@ Modify your grub.cfg (in the firmware) [using this tutorial](grub_cbfs.html); just change the default menu entry 'Load Operating System' to say this inside: -**cryptomount -a**\ -**set root='lvm/matrix-rootvol'**\ + cryptomount -a + set root='lvm/matrix-rootvol' **linux /vmlinuz root=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol cryptdevice=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol:root**\ **initrd /initrd.img** diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md b/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md @@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ article](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Solid_State_Drives). Edit whole article and keep all points in mind, adapting them for this guide. Securely wipe the drive:\ -\# **dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sda; sync**\ +\# dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sda; sync NOTE: If you have an SSD, only do this the first time. If it was already LUKS-encrypted before, use the info below to wipe the LUKS header. Also, check online for your SSD what the recommended erase block size is. For @@ -85,7 +85,7 @@ header. showed me how to do this. It recommends doing the first 3MiB. Now, that guide is recommending putting zero there. I'm going to use urandom. Do this:\ -\# **head -c 3145728 /dev/urandom > /dev/sda; sync**\ +\# head -c 3145728 /dev/urandom > /dev/sda; sync (Wiping the LUKS header is important, since it has hashed passphrases and so on. It's 'secure', but 'potentially' a risk). @@ -96,8 +96,8 @@ Change keyboard layout Parabola live shell assumes US Qwerty. If you have something different, list the available keymaps and use yours:\ -\# **localectl list-keymaps**\ -\# **loadkeys LAYOUT**\ +\# localectl list-keymaps +\# loadkeys LAYOUT For me, LAYOUT would have been dvorak-uk. @@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ It tells me to run:\ \# **cryptsetup benchmark** (for making sure the list below is populated)\ Then:\ -\# **cat /proc/crypto**\ +\# cat /proc/crypto This gives me crypto options that I can use. It also provides a representation of the best way to set up LUKS (in this case, security is a priority; speed, a distant second). To gain a better understanding, I @@ -187,17 +187,17 @@ Create LVM Now I refer to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/LVM>. Open the LUKS partition:\ -\# **cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda1 lvm**\ +\# cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda1 lvm (it will be available at /dev/mapper/lvm) Create LVM partition:\ -\# **pvcreate /dev/mapper/lvm**\ +\# pvcreate /dev/mapper/lvm Show that you just created it:\ \# **pvdisplay** Now I create the volume group, inside of which the logical volumes will be created:\ -\# **vgcreate matrix /dev/mapper/lvm**\ +\# vgcreate matrix /dev/mapper/lvm (volume group name is 'matrix' - choose your own name, if you like) Show that you created it:\ \# **vgdisplay** @@ -227,7 +227,7 @@ Create / and swap partitions, and mount --------------------------------------- For the swapvol LV I use:\ -\# **mkswap /dev/mapper/matrix-swapvol**\ +\# mkswap /dev/mapper/matrix-swapvol Activate swap:\ \# **swapon /dev/matrix/swapvol** @@ -250,7 +250,7 @@ Now I am following the rest of referenced <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Installation_guide>. Create /home and /boot on root mountpoint:\ -\# **mkdir -p /mnt/home**\ +\# mkdir -p /mnt/home \# **mkdir -p /mnt/boot** Once all the remaining partitions, if any, have been mounted, the @@ -259,8 +259,8 @@ devices are ready to install Parabola. In **/etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist**, comment out all lines except the Server line closest to where you are (I chose the UK Parabola server (main server)) and then did:\ -\# **pacman -Syy**\ -\# **pacman -Syu**\ +\# pacman -Syy +\# pacman -Syu \# **pacman -Sy pacman** (and then I did the other 2 steps above, again)\ In my case I did the steps in the next paragraph, and followed the steps @@ -272,23 +272,23 @@ the Parabola install guide.\    Check there first to see if steps differ by now.\    Now you have to update the default Parabola keyring. This is used for signing and verifying packages:\ -   \# **pacman -Sy parabola-keyring**\ +   \# pacman -Sy parabola-keyring    It says that if you get GPG errors, then it's probably an expired key and, therefore, you should do:\ -   \# **pacman-key \--populate parabola**\ -   \# **pacman-key \--refresh-keys**\ -   \# **pacman -Sy parabola-keyring**\ +   \# pacman-key \--populate parabola +   \# pacman-key \--refresh-keys +   \# pacman -Sy parabola-keyring    To be honest, you should do the above anyway. Parabola has a lot of maintainers, and a lot of keys. Really!\    If you get an error mentioning dirmngr, do:\ -   \# **dirmngr </dev/null**\ +   \# dirmngr </dev/null    Also, it says that if the clock is set incorrectly then you have to manually set the correct time\    (if keys are listed as expired because of it):\ -   \# **date MMDDhhmm\[\[CC\]YY\]\[.ss\]**\ +   \# date MMDDhhmm\[\[CC\]YY\]\[.ss\]    I also had to install:\ -   \# **pacman -S archlinux-keyring**\ -   \# **pacman-key \--populate archlinux**\ +   \# pacman -S archlinux-keyring +   \# pacman-key \--populate archlinux    In my case I saw some conflicting files reported in pacman, stopping me from using it.\    I deleted the files that it mentioned and then it worked. @@ -296,7 +296,7 @@ Specifically, I had this error:\    *licenses: /usr/share/licenses/common/MPS exists in filesystem*\    I rm -Rf'd the file and then pacman worked. I'm told that the following would have also made it work:\ -   \# **pacman -Sf licenses**\ +   \# pacman -Sf licenses </troubleshooting>\ I also like to install other packages (base-devel, compilers and so on) @@ -313,9 +313,9 @@ Configure the system Generate an fstab - UUIDs are used because they have certain advantages (see <https://wiki.parabola.nu/Fstab#Identifying_filesystems>. If you prefer labels instead, replace the -U option with -L):\ -\# **genfstab -U -p /mnt >> /mnt/etc/fstab**\ +\# genfstab -U -p /mnt >> /mnt/etc/fstab Check the created file:\ -\# **cat /mnt/etc/fstab**\ +\# cat /mnt/etc/fstab (If there are any errors, edit the file. Do **NOT** run the genfstab command again!) @@ -338,22 +338,22 @@ Parabola does not have wget. This is sinister. Install it:\ \# **pacman -S wget** Locale:\ -\# **vi /etc/locale.gen**\ +\# vi /etc/locale.gen Uncomment your needed localisations. For example en\_GB.UTF-8 (UTF-8 is highly recommended over other options).\ -\# **locale-gen**\ -\# **echo LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8 > /etc/locale.conf**\ +\# locale-gen +\# echo LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8 > /etc/locale.conf \# **export LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8** Console font and keymap:\ -\# **vi /etc/vconsole.conf**\ +\# vi /etc/vconsole.conf In my case: KEYMAP=dvorak-uk FONT=lat9w-16 Time zone:\ -\# **ln -s /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/London /etc/localtime**\ +\# ln -s /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/London /etc/localtime (Replace Zone and Subzone to your liking. See /usr/share/zoneinfo) Hardware clock:\ @@ -361,9 +361,9 @@ Hardware clock:\ Hostname: Write your hostname to /etc/hostname. For example, if your hostname is parabola:\ -\# **echo parabola > /etc/hostname**\ +\# echo parabola > /etc/hostname Add the same hostname to /etc/hosts:\ -\# **vi /etc/hosts**\ +\# vi /etc/hosts #<ip-address> <hostname.domain.org> <hostname> 127.0.0.1 localhost.localdomain localhost parabola @@ -377,7 +377,7 @@ Mkinitcpio: Configure /etc/mkinitcpio.conf as needed (see /usr/lib/initcpio/hooks, and build hooks can be found in /usr/lib/initcpio/install. (\# **mkinitcpio -H hookname** gives information about each hook.) Specifically, for this use case:\ -\# **vi /etc/mkinitcpio.conf**\ +\# vi /etc/mkinitcpio.conf Then modify the file like so: - MODULES="i915" @@ -402,18 +402,18 @@ Then modify the file like so: Now using mkinitcpio, you can create the kernel and ramdisk for booting with (this is different from Arch, specifying linux-libre instead of linux):\ -\# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre**\ +\# mkinitcpio -p linux-libre Also do it for linux-libre-lts:\ -\# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-lts**\ +\# mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-lts Also do it for linux-libre-grsec:\ \# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-grsec** Set the root password: At the time of writing, Parabola used SHA512 by default for its password hashing. I referred to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/SHA_password_hashes>.\ -\# **vi /etc/pam.d/passwd**\ +\# vi /etc/pam.d/passwd Add rounds=65536 at the end of the uncommented 'password' line.\ -\# **passwd root**\ +\# passwd root Make sure to set a secure password! Also, it must never be the same as your LUKS password. @@ -455,17 +455,17 @@ Exit from chroot:\ \# **exit** unmount:\ -\# **umount -R /mnt**\ +\# umount -R /mnt \# **swapoff -a** deactivate the lvm lv's:\ -\# **lvchange -an /dev/matrix/root**\ -\# **lvchange -an /dev/matrix/swapvol**\ +\# lvchange -an /dev/matrix/root +\# lvchange -an /dev/matrix/swapvol Lock the encrypted partition (close it):\ \# **cryptsetup luksClose lvm** -\# **shutdown -h now**\ +\# shutdown -h now Remove the installation media, then boot up again. @@ -477,12 +477,12 @@ Initially you will have to boot manually. Press C to get to the GRUB command line. The underlined parts are optional (using those 2 underlines will boot lts kernel instead of normal). -grub> **cryptomount -a**\ -grub> **set root='lvm/matrix-root'**\ +grub> cryptomount -a +grub> set root='lvm/matrix-root' grub> **linux /boot/vmlinuz-linux-libre-lts root=/dev/matrix/root cryptdevice=/dev/sda1:root**\ -grub> **initrd /boot/initramfs-linux-libre-lts.img**\ -grub> **boot**\ +grub> initrd /boot/initramfs-linux-libre-lts.img +grub> boot You could also make it load /boot/vmlinuz-linux-libre-grsec and /boot/initramfs-linux-libre-grsec.img @@ -521,14 +521,14 @@ I will go for the re-flash option here. Firstly, cd to the libreboot\_util/cbfstool/{armv7l i686 x86\_64} directory. Dump the current firmware - where *libreboot.rom* is an example: make sure to adapt:\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom**\ +\# flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom If flashrom complains about multiple flash chips detected, add a *-c* option at the end, with the name of your chosen chip is quotes.\ You can check if everything is in there (*grub.cfg* and *grubtest.cfg* would be really nice):\ -$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom print**\ +$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom print Extract grubtest.cfg:\ -$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg**\ +$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg And modify:\ $ **vi grubtest.cfg** @@ -559,18 +559,18 @@ hardening your GRUB configuration, for security purposes. Save your changes in grubtest.cfg, then delete the unmodified config from the ROM image:\ -$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grubtest.cfg**\ +$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grubtest.cfg and insert the modified grubtest.cfg:\ $ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg -t raw**\ Now refer to <http://libreboot.org/docs/install/#flashrom>. Cd (up) to the libreboot\_util directory and update the flash chip contents:\ -\# **./flash update libreboot.rom**\ +\# ./flash update libreboot.rom Ocassionally, coreboot changes the name of a given board. If flashrom complains about a board mismatch, but you are sure that you chose the correct ROM image, then run this alternative command:\ -\# **./flash forceupdate libreboot.rom**\ +\# ./flash forceupdate libreboot.rom You should see "Verifying flash\... VERIFIED." written at the end of the flashrom output. @@ -601,14 +601,14 @@ $ **sed -e 's:(cbfsdisk)/grub.cfg:(cbfsdisk)/grubtest.cfg:g' -e 's:Switch to grub.cfg:Switch to grubtest.cfg:g' < grubtest.cfg > grub.cfg**\ Delete the grub.cfg that remained inside the ROM:\ -$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grub.cfg**\ +$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grub.cfg Add the modified version that you just made:\ -$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grub.cfg -f grub.cfg -t raw**\ +$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grub.cfg -f grub.cfg -t raw Now you have a modified ROM. Once more, refer to <http://libreboot.org/docs/install/#flashrom>. Cd to the libreboot\_util directory and update the flash chip contents:\ -\# **./flash update libreboot.rom**\ +\# ./flash update libreboot.rom And wait for the "Verifying flash\... VERIFIED." Once you have done that, shut down and then boot up with your new configuration. @@ -640,17 +640,17 @@ Boot up and login as root or your user. Then generate the key file:\ \# **dd bs=512 count=4 if=/dev/urandom of=/etc/mykeyfile iflag=fullblock**\ Insert it into the luks volume:\ -\# **cryptsetup luksAddKey /dev/sdX /etc/mykeyfile**\ +\# cryptsetup luksAddKey /dev/sdX /etc/mykeyfile and enter your LUKS passphrase when prompted. Add the keyfile to the initramfs by adding it to FILES in /etc/mkinitcpio.conf. For example:\ -\# **FILES="/etc/mykeyfile"**\ +\# FILES="/etc/mykeyfile" Create the initramfs image from scratch:\ -\# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre**\ -\# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-lts**\ -\# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-grsec**\ +\# mkinitcpio -p linux-libre +\# mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-lts +\# mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-grsec Add the following to your grub.cfg - you are now able to do that, see above! -, or add it in the kernel command line for GRUB:\ -\# **cryptkey=rootfs:/etc/mykeyfile**\ +\# cryptkey=rootfs:/etc/mykeyfile \ You can also place this inside the grub.cfg that exists in CBFS: [grub\_cbfs.html](grub_cbfs.html). diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/grub_boot_installer.md b/docs/gnulinux/grub_boot_installer.md @@ -31,18 +31,18 @@ If you downloaded your ISO on an existing GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable GNU+Linux USB drive: Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**$ dmesg**\ + $ dmesg Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ **$ lsblk** Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For example:\ -**$ sudo umount /dev/sdX***\ + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX* **\# umount /dev/sdX*** dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ -**$ sudo dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync**\ + $ sudo dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync **\# dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync** You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. @@ -73,17 +73,17 @@ If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or OpenBSD system, here is how to create the bootable GNU+Linux USB drive: Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**$ dmesg | tail**\ + $ dmesg | tail Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ **$ disklabel sd3** Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For example:\ -**$ doas umount /dev/sd3i**\ + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the OpenBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ -**$ doas dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync**\ + $ doas dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -143,13 +143,13 @@ distribution it is that you are trying to install.* If the ISOLINUX parser or *Search for GRUB configuration* options won't work, then press C in GRUB to access the command line.\ -grub> **ls**\ +grub> ls Get the device from above output, eg (usb0). Example:\ -grub> **cat (usb0)/isolinux/isolinux.cfg**\ +grub> cat (usb0)/isolinux/isolinux.cfg Either this will show the ISOLINUX menuentries for that ISO, or link to other .cfg files, for example /isolinux/foo.cfg.\ If it did that, then you do:\ -grub> **cat (usb0)/isolinux/foo.cfg**\ +grub> cat (usb0)/isolinux/foo.cfg And so on, until you find the correct menuentries for ISOLINUX. **The file */isolinux/foo.cfg* is a fictional example. Do not actually use this example, unless you actually have that file, if it is @@ -170,10 +170,10 @@ Now look at the ISOLINUX menuentry. It'll look like:\ append PARAMETERS initrd=/path/to/initrd MAYBE\_MORE\_PARAMETERS\ ** GRUB works the same way, but in it's own way. Example GRUB commands:\ -grub> **set root='usb0'**\ -grub> **linux /path/to/kernel PARAMETERS MAYBE\_MORE\_PARAMETERS**\ -grub> **initrd /path/to/initrd**\ -grub> **boot**\ +grub> set root='usb0' +grub> linux /path/to/kernel PARAMETERS MAYBE\_MORE\_PARAMETERS +grub> initrd /path/to/initrd +grub> boot Note: *usb0* may be incorrect. Check the output of the *ls* command in GRUB, to see a list of USB devices/partitions. Of course this will vary from distro to distro. If you did all of that correctly, then it should diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md b/docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md @@ -141,8 +141,8 @@ image file is named *libreboot.rom*, so please make sure to adapt. ROM images are included pre-compiled in libreboot. You can also dump your current firmware, using flashrom:\ -$ **sudo flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom**\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom**\ +$ sudo flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom +\# flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom If you are told to specify the chip, add the option **-c {your chip}** to the command, for example:\ \# **flashrom -c MX25L6405 -p internal -r libreboot.rom** @@ -193,11 +193,11 @@ Testing **Now you have a modified ROM. Refer back to [../install/\#flashrom](../install/#flashrom) for information on how to flash it.\ -$ **cd /libreboot\_util** \# **./flash update libreboot.rom**\ +$ cd /libreboot\_util** \# **./flash update libreboot.rom Ocassionally, coreboot changes the name of a given board. If flashrom complains about a board mismatch, but you are sure that you chose the correct ROM image, then run this alternative command:\ -\# **./flash forceupdate libreboot.rom**\ +\# ./flash forceupdate libreboot.rom You should see **"Verifying flash\... VERIFIED."** written at the end of the flashrom output. Once you have done that, shut down and then boot up with your new test configuration.** diff --git a/docs/grub/index.md b/docs/grub/index.md @@ -47,7 +47,7 @@ one](http://sourceforge.net/projects/dejavu/files/dejavu/2.34/dejavu-fonts-ttf-2 This is a free font that is also contained in GNU+Linux distributions like Debian, Devuan or Parabola. -**$ cd libreboot\_src/grub**\ + $ cd libreboot\_src/grub compile grub (the build scripts info on how to do this)\ come back out into libreboot\_src/resources/grub:\ **$ cd ../libreboot\_src/resources/grub/font** @@ -77,7 +77,7 @@ Custom keyboard layout in GRUB (for reference) {#grub_custom_keyboard} Keymaps are stored in resources/utilities/grub-assemble/keymap/. Example (French Azerty):\ -**$ ckbcomp fr > frazerty**\ + $ ckbcomp fr > frazerty \ Go in grub directory:\ **cat frazerty | ./grub/grub-mklayout -o frazerty.gkb** diff --git a/docs/hardware/t60_security.md b/docs/hardware/t60_security.md @@ -127,7 +127,7 @@ system:\ Remove microphone (soldering iron not needed. Just wedge it out gently):\ ![](../images/t60_dev/0039.JPG)\ -**Rationale:**\ + Rationale: Another reason to remove the microphone: If your computer gets[\[1\]](#ref1) compromised, it can record what you say, and use it to receive data from nearby devices if they're compromised too. Also, @@ -142,7 +142,7 @@ Remove infrared:\ Remove cardbus (it's in a socket, no need to disable. Just remove the port itself):\ ![](../images/t60_dev/0041.JPG)\ -**Rationale:**\ + Rationale: It has direct memory access and can be used to extract sensitive details (such as LUKS keys). See 'GoodBIOS' video linked at the end (speaker is Peter Stuge, a coreboot hacker). The video covers X60 but the same diff --git a/docs/hardware/x60_security.md b/docs/hardware/x60_security.md @@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ it wasn't needed). **This is optional** Remove the microphone (can desolder it, but you can also easily pull it off with you hands). Already removed here:\ ![](../images/x60_security/0001_microphone.jpg)\ -**Rationale:**\ + Rationale: Another reason to remove the microphone: If your computer gets[\[1\]](#ref1) compromised, it can record what you say, and use it to receive data from nearby devices if they're compromised too. Also, diff --git a/docs/hcl/gm45_remove_me.md b/docs/hcl/gm45_remove_me.md @@ -41,7 +41,7 @@ factory.bin dump. ich9gen executables can be found under ./ich9deblob/ statically compiled in libreboot\_util. If you are using src or git, build ich9gen from source with:\ -$ **./oldbuild module ich9deblob**\ +$ ./oldbuild module ich9deblob The executable will appear under resources/utilities/ich9deblob/ Run:\ @@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ On GM45 laptops that use flash descriptors, the MAC address or the onboard ethernet chipset is flashed (inside the ROM image). You should generate a descriptor+gbe image with your own MAC address inside (with the Gbe checksum updated to match). Run:\ -$ **./ich9gen \--macaddress XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX**\ +$ ./ich9gen \--macaddress XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX (replace the XX chars with the hexadecimal chars in the MAC address that you want) @@ -166,7 +166,7 @@ If you are working with libreboot\_src (or git), you can find the source under resources/utilities/ich9deblob/ and will already be compiled if you ran **./oldbuild module all** or **./oldbuild module ich9deblob** from the main directory (./), otherwise you can build it like so:\ -$ **./oldbuild module ich9deblob**\ +$ ./oldbuild module ich9deblob An executable file named **ich9deblob** will now appear under resources/utilities/ich9deblob/ diff --git a/docs/hcl/index.md b/docs/hcl/index.md @@ -435,7 +435,7 @@ the macbook2,1. They are included here in case the main site goes down for whatever reason, since they include a lot of useful information. Backups created using wget:\ -**$ wget -m -p -E -k -K -np http://macbook.donderklumpen.de/**\ + $ wget -m -p -E -k -K -np http://macbook.donderklumpen.de/ **$ wget -m -p -E -k -K -np http://macbook.donderklumpen.de/coreboot/**\ Use **-e robots=off** if using this trick for other sites and the site diff --git a/docs/hcl/t500.md b/docs/hcl/t500.md @@ -82,7 +82,7 @@ The patches above are based on the output from ich9deblob on a factory.rom image dumped from the T500 with a SOIC-8 4MiB flash chip. The patch re-creates the X200 descriptor/gbe source, so the commands were something like:\ -$ **diff -u t500gbe x200gbe**\ +$ diff -u t500gbe x200gbe $ **diff -u t500descriptor x200descriptor** ME VSCC table is in a different place and a different size on the T500. diff --git a/docs/index.md b/docs/index.md @@ -167,7 +167,7 @@ If you are at least 127 commits after release 20150518 (commit message **upstream** stable release of libreboot after 20150518), then you can press C at the GRUB console, and use this command to find out what version of libreboot you have:\ -**cat (cbfsdisk)/lbversion**\ + cat (cbfsdisk)/lbversion This will also work on non-release images (the version string is automatically generated, using *git describe \--tags HEAD*), built from the git repository. A file named *version* will also be included in the @@ -177,7 +177,7 @@ If it exists, you can also extract this *lbversion* file by using the *cbfstool* utility which libreboot includes, from a ROM image that you either dumped or haven't flashed yet. In your distribution, run cbfstool on your ROM image (*libreboot.rom*, in this example):\ -$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n lbversion -f lbversion**\ +$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n lbversion -f lbversion You will now have a file, named *lbversion*, which you can read in whatever program it is that you use for reading/writing text files. @@ -188,7 +188,7 @@ repository below 127 commits after 20150518, you can find a file named *commitid* inside the archives. If you are using pre-built ROM images from the libreboot project, you can press C in GRUB for access to the terminal, and then run this command:\ -**lscoreboot**\ + lscoreboot You may find a date in here, detailing when that ROM image was built. For pre-built images distributed by the libreboot project, this is a rough approximation of what version you have, because the version diff --git a/docs/install/bbb_setup.md b/docs/install/bbb_setup.md @@ -158,7 +158,7 @@ Alternatives to SSH (in case SSH fails) You can also use a serial FTDI debug board with GNU Screen, to access the serial console.\ -\# **screen /dev/ttyUSB0 115200**\ +\# screen /dev/ttyUSB0 115200 Here are some example photos:\ ![](images/x200/ftdi.jpg) ![](images/x200/ftdi_port.jpg)\ @@ -211,14 +211,14 @@ contents of this file with: Run **apt-get update** and **apt-get upgrade** then reboot the BBB, before continuing. Check that the firmware exists:\ -\# **ls /lib/firmware/BB-SPI0-01-00A0.***\ +\# ls /lib/firmware/BB-SPI0-01-00A0.* Output: /lib/firmware/BB-SPI0-01-00A0.dtbo Then:\ -\# **echo BB-SPI0-01 > /sys/devices/bone\_capemgr.*/slots**\ -\# **cat /sys/devices/bone\_capemgr.*/slots**\ +\# echo BB-SPI0-01 > /sys/devices/bone\_capemgr.*/slots +\# cat /sys/devices/bone\_capemgr.*/slots Output: 0: 54:PF--- @@ -230,7 +230,7 @@ Output: 7: ff:P-O-L Override Board Name,00A0,Override Manuf,BB-SPI0-01 Verify that the spidev device now exists:\ -\# **ls -al /dev/spid***\ +\# ls -al /dev/spid* Output: crw-rw---T 1 root spi 153, 0 Nov 19 21:07 /dev/spidev1.0 @@ -253,7 +253,7 @@ Finally, get the ROM image that you would like to flash and put that on your BBB. Now test flashrom:\ -\# **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512**\ +\# ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 Output: Calibrating delay loop... OK. diff --git a/docs/install/c201.md b/docs/install/c201.md @@ -148,20 +148,20 @@ transferred to the device. The following operations have to be executed with root privileges on the device (e.g. using the *root* account). In addition, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be made executable:\ -\# **chmod a+x cros-flash-replace**\ +\# chmod a+x cros-flash-replace The SPI flash has to be read first:\ -\# **flashrom -p host -r flash.img**\ +\# flashrom -p host -r flash.img **Note: it might be a good idea to copy the produced flash.img file at this point and store it outside of the device for backup purposes.** Then, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be executed as such:\ -\# **./cros-flash-replace flash.img coreboot ro-frid**\ +\# ./cros-flash-replace flash.img coreboot ro-frid If any error is shown, it is definitely a bad idea to go further than this point. The resulting flash image can then be flashed back:\ -\# **flashrom -p host -w flash.img**\ +\# flashrom -p host -w flash.img You should also see within the output the following:\ **"Verifying flash\... VERIFIED."** @@ -195,21 +195,21 @@ transferred to the host. The following operations have to be executed with root privileges on the host (e.g. using the *root* account). In addition, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be made executable:\ -\# **chmod a+x cros-flash-replace**\ +\# chmod a+x cros-flash-replace The SPI flash has to be read first (using the right spi programmer):\ -\# **flashrom -p *programmer* -r flash.img**\ +\# flashrom -p *programmer* -r flash.img **Note: it might be a good idea to copy the produced flash.img file at this point and store it outside of the device for backup purposes.** Then, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be executed as such:\ -\# **./cros-flash-replace flash.img coreboot ro-frid**\ +\# ./cros-flash-replace flash.img coreboot ro-frid If any error is shown, it is definitely a bad idea to go further than this point. The resulting flash image can then be flashed back (using the right spi programmer):\ -\# **flashrom -p *programmer* -w flash.img**\ +\# flashrom -p *programmer* -w flash.img You should also see within the output the following:\ **"Verifying flash\... VERIFIED."** diff --git a/docs/install/index.md b/docs/install/index.md @@ -330,7 +330,7 @@ are swapped"**. You should also see within the output the following:\ **"Your flash chip is in an unknown state"**, **"FAILED"** and -**"DO NOT REBOOT OR POWEROFF"**\ + "DO NOT REBOOT OR POWEROFF" Seeing this means that the operation was a **resounding** success! **DON'T PANIC**. diff --git a/docs/install/r400_external.md b/docs/install/r400_external.md @@ -73,7 +73,7 @@ Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== Use this to find out:\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -V**\ +\# flashrom -p internal -V [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -231,7 +231,7 @@ Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html\#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). Test that flashrom works:\ -\# **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512**\ +\# ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 In this case, the output was: flashrom v0.9.7-r1854 on Linux 3.8.13-bone47 (armv7l) @@ -255,7 +255,7 @@ Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* have been removed.\ Now compare the 3 images:\ -\# **sha512sum factory*.rom**\ +\# sha512sum factory*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This is useful for reverse engineering work, if there is a desirable diff --git a/docs/install/t400_external.md b/docs/install/t400_external.md @@ -237,7 +237,7 @@ Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html\#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). Test that flashrom works:\ -\# **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512**\ +\# ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 In this case, the output was: flashrom v0.9.7-r1854 on Linux 3.8.13-bone47 (armv7l) @@ -261,7 +261,7 @@ Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* have been removed.\ Now compare the 3 images:\ -\# **sha512sum factory*.rom**\ +\# sha512sum factory*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This is useful for reverse engineering work, if there is a desirable diff --git a/docs/install/t500_external.md b/docs/install/t500_external.md @@ -242,7 +242,7 @@ Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html\#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). Test that flashrom works:\ -\# **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512**\ +\# ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 In this case, the output was: flashrom v0.9.7-r1854 on Linux 3.8.13-bone47 (armv7l) @@ -266,7 +266,7 @@ Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* have been removed.\ Now compare the 3 images:\ -\# **sha512sum factory*.rom**\ +\# sha512sum factory*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This is useful for reverse engineering work, if there is a desirable diff --git a/docs/install/x200_external.md b/docs/install/x200_external.md @@ -171,7 +171,7 @@ Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html\#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). Test that flashrom works:\ -\# **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512**\ +\# ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 In this case, the output was: flashrom v0.9.7-r1854 on Linux 3.8.13-bone47 (armv7l) @@ -195,7 +195,7 @@ Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* have been removed.\ Now compare the 3 images:\ -\# **sha512sum factory*.rom**\ +\# sha512sum factory*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This is useful for reverse engineering work, if there is a desirable diff --git a/docs/misc/index.md b/docs/misc/index.md @@ -80,7 +80,7 @@ and added the following to /etc/systemd/system/powertop.service : WantedBy=multi-user.target Finally, as root do that:\ -**\# systemctl enable powertop**\ + \# systemctl enable powertop **\# systemctl start powertop** The next time you boot the system, the buzz will be gone. @@ -227,11 +227,11 @@ is included in libreboot, and can be used to enable or disable this behaviour. Disable or enable beeps when removing/adding the charger:\ -$ **sudo ./nvramtool -w power\_management\_beeps=Enable**\ +$ sudo ./nvramtool -w power\_management\_beeps=Enable $ **sudo ./nvramtool -w power\_management\_beeps=Disable** Disable or enable beeps when battery is low:\ -$ **sudo ./nvramtool -w low\_battery\_beep=Enable**\ +$ sudo ./nvramtool -w low\_battery\_beep=Enable $ **sudo ./nvramtool -w low\_battery\_beep=Disable** A reboot is required, for these changes to take effect. @@ -241,15 +241,15 @@ A reboot is required, for these changes to take effect. Get EDID: Find out the name (model) of your LCD panel {#get_edid_panelname} ===================================================== -Get the panel name with **sudo get-edid | strings**\ +Get the panel name with sudo get-edid | strings Or look in **/sys/class/drm/card0-LVDS-1/edid** Alternatively you can use i2cdump. In Debian and Devuan, this is in the package i2c-tools.\ -$ **sudo modprobe i2c-dev**\ +$ sudo modprobe i2c-dev $ **sudo i2cdump -y 5 0x50** (you might have to change the value for -y)\ -$ **sudo rmmod i2c-dev**\ +$ sudo rmmod i2c-dev You'll see the panel name in the output (from the EDID dump). If neither of these options work (or they are unavailable), physically diff --git a/docs/misc/patch.md b/docs/misc/patch.md @@ -76,7 +76,7 @@ Note the git revision that you did this with:\ **$ git log** Alternatively (better yet), commit your changes and then use:\ -$ **git format-patch -N**\ +$ git format-patch -N Replace N with the number of commits that you want to show. [Back to top of page.](#pagetop)