libreboot

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commit e5d71ae5577d2ebafbda4a43a20211e996365d3f
parent f02ec452b4628e87121412e14ad9899cd85f98d5
Author: Leah Rowe <info@minifree.org>
Date:   Mon,  3 Apr 2017 20:57:12 +0200

Merge branch 'web/code-blocks' of vimuser/libreboot into master

Diffstat:
docs/archive_old.md | 18++++++++++++------
docs/bsd/freebsd.md | 51++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------
docs/bsd/index.md | 1+
docs/bsd/netbsd.md | 53+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++----------------------
docs/bsd/openbsd.md | 55++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++-----------------------
docs/depthcharge/index.md | 28+++++++++++++++++++---------
docs/future/index.md | 19+++++++++++--------
docs/future/old.md | 6++++--
docs/git/index.md | 131++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------------
docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md | 228+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------------------------
docs/gnulinux/encrypted_debian.md | 13+++++++------
docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md | 352++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------------------
docs/gnulinux/grub_boot_installer.md | 59++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------------------
docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md | 49++++++++++++++++++++++++++++---------------------
docs/gnulinux/grub_hardening.md | 5+++--
docs/gnulinux/index.md | 1+
docs/grub/index.md | 15+++++++++------
docs/hardware/dock.md | 1+
docs/hardware/index.md | 1+
docs/hardware/t60_heatsink.md | 1+
docs/hardware/t60_security.md | 4+++-
docs/hardware/x60_heatsink.md | 1+
docs/hardware/x60_security.md | 4+++-
docs/hcl/c201.md | 1+
docs/hcl/d945gclf.md | 1+
docs/hcl/gm45_remove_me.md | 32+++++++++++++++++++-------------
docs/hcl/index.md | 6++++--
docs/hcl/kcma-d8.md | 1+
docs/hcl/kfsn4-dre.md | 1+
docs/hcl/kgpe-d16.md | 1+
docs/hcl/t400.md | 1+
docs/hcl/t500.md | 7++++---
docs/hcl/x200.md | 1+
docs/index.md | 25++++++++++++++++---------
docs/install/bbb_setup.md | 35++++++++++++++++++++---------------
docs/install/c201.md | 39+++++++++++++++++++++++----------------
docs/install/d510mo.md | 5+++--
docs/install/ga-g41m-es2l.md | 5+++--
docs/install/index.md | 29+++++++++++++++++------------
docs/install/kcma-d8.md | 1+
docs/install/kgpe-d16.md | 1+
docs/install/r400_external.md | 14++++++++------
docs/install/rpi_setup.md | 1+
docs/install/t400_external.md | 14++++++++------
docs/install/t500_external.md | 14++++++++------
docs/install/t60_unbrick.md | 1+
docs/install/x200_external.md | 14++++++++------
docs/install/x60_unbrick.md | 1+
docs/install/x60tablet_unbrick.md | 1+
docs/misc/bbb_ehci.md | 3++-
docs/misc/index.md | 58+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------------------
docs/misc/patch.md | 65+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------------------
docs/release.md | 1+
www/amd-libre.md | 1+
www/faq.md | 1+
www/git.md | 1+
www/gpg.md | 7++++---
www/lists.md | 1+
www/rsync.md | 12++++++------
59 files changed, 892 insertions(+), 606 deletions(-)

diff --git a/docs/archive_old.md b/docs/archive_old.md @@ -16,6 +16,7 @@ Releases - [r20150518 (18th May 2015)](#release20150518) - [r20150124 (24th January 2015), r20150126 (26th January 2015), r20150208 (8th February 2015)](#release20150124) + - [r20141015 (15th October 2014)](#release20141015) - [r20140911 (6th release)](#release20140911) (11th September 2014 **pre-release, 7th beta**) @@ -422,7 +423,8 @@ Changes for this release (latest changes first, earliest changes last) - build: Only generate the GRUB configurations once (re-use on all images) - Only build 2 GRUB payload executables, re-use on all boards. -- resources/utilities/grub-assemble/gen.txtmode.sh: Use GNU BASH\ +- resources/utilities/grub-assemble/gen.txtmode.sh: Use GNU BASH + resources/utilities/grub-assemble/gen.vesafb.sh: Use GNU BASH - scripts (error handling): Replace exit with exit 1 (make debugging easier) @@ -625,7 +627,8 @@ Revisions for r20140903 (6th beta) (3rd September 2014) - Added gcry\_serpent and gcry\_whirlpool to the GRUB module list in the 'build' script (for luks users) - **Libreboot is now based on a new coreboot version from August 23rd, - 2014:\ + 2014: + Merged commits (relates to boards that were already supported in libreboot):** - <http://review.coreboot.org/#/c/6697/> @@ -746,10 +749,13 @@ Revisions for r20140903 (6th beta) (3rd September 2014) ohci, uhci, usb, usbserial\_pl2303, usbserial\_ftdi, usbserial\_usbdebug - set prefix=(memdisk)/boot/grub - - For native graphics (recommended by coreboot wiki):\ - gfxpayload=keep\ - terminal\_output \--append gfxterm - - Play a beep on startup:\ + - For native graphics (recommended by coreboot wiki): + + gfxpayload=keep + + terminal\_output --append gfxterm + - Play a beep on startup: + play 480 440 1 - Documentation: updated gnulinux/grub\_cbfs.html to make it safer (and easier) to follow. diff --git a/docs/bsd/freebsd.md b/docs/bsd/freebsd.md @@ -59,18 +59,23 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in LibertyBSD or OpenBSD) If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or OpenBSD system, here is how to create the bootable FreeBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**\$ dmesg | tail**\ -Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ -**\$ disklabel sd3** +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + + $ dmesg | tail + +Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3: + + $ disklabel sd3 Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ -**\$ doas umount /dev/sd3i**\ +example: + + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the -FreeBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ -**\$ doas dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync**\ +FreeBSD installer to it with dd. For example: + + $ doas dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -83,20 +88,24 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in GNU+Linux) If you downloaded your ISO on a GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable FreeBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**\$ dmesg**\ -Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ -**\$ lsblk** +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + + $ dmesg +Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is: + + $ lsblk Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ -**\$ sudo umount /dev/sdX\***\ -**\# umount /dev/sdX\*** +example: + + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX\* + # umount /dev/sdX\* dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your -distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ -**\$ sudo dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync**\ -**\# dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync** +distro ISO to it with dd. For example: + + $ sudo dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync + # dd if=freebsd.img of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -110,9 +119,9 @@ Installing FreeBSD without full disk encryption Press C in GRUB to access the command line: -grub> **kfreebsd (usb0,gpt3)/boot/kernel/kernel**\ -grub> **set FreeBSD.vfs.mountfrom=ufs:/dev/da1p3**\ -grub> **boot** + grub> kfreebsd (usb0,gpt3)/boot/kernel/kernel + grub> set FreeBSD.vfs.mountfrom=ufs:/dev/da1p3\ + grub> boot It will start booting into the FreeBSD installer. Follow the normal process for installing FreeBSD. diff --git a/docs/bsd/index.md b/docs/bsd/index.md @@ -11,6 +11,7 @@ instructions have yet to be written.** - [How to install NetBSD on a libreboot system](netbsd.html) - [How to install LibertyBSD or OpenBSD on a libreboot system](openbsd.html) + - [How to install FreeBSD on a libreboot system](freebsd.html) diff --git a/docs/bsd/netbsd.md b/docs/bsd/netbsd.md @@ -55,18 +55,23 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in LibertyBSD or NetBSD) If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or NetBSD system, here is how to create the bootable NetBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**\$ dmesg | tail**\ -Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ -**\$ disklabel sd3** +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + + $ dmesg | tail + +Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3: + + $ disklabel sd3 Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ -**\$ doas umount /dev/sd3i**\ +example: + + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the -NetBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ -**\$ doas netbsd.iso of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync**\ +NetBSD installer to it with dd. For example: + + $ doas netbsd.iso of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -79,20 +84,24 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in GNU+Linux) If you downloaded your ISO on a GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable NetBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**\$ dmesg**\ -Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ -**\$ lsblk** +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + + $ dmesg +Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is: + + $ lsblk Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ -**\$ sudo umount /dev/sdX\***\ -**\# umount /dev/sdX\*** +example: + + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX\* + # umount /dev/sdX\* dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your -distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ -**\$ sudo dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync**\ -**\# dd if=netbsd.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync** +distro ISO to it with dd. For example: + + $ sudo dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync + # dd if=netbsd.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -107,8 +116,8 @@ Installing NetBSD without full disk encryption You might have to use an external USB keyboard during the installation. Press C to access the GRUB terminal. -grub> **knetbsd -r sd0a (usb0,netbsd1)/netbsd**\ -grub> **boot** + grub> knetbsd -r sd0a (usb0,netbsd1)/netbsd + grub> boot It will start booting into the NetBSD installer. Follow the normal process for installing NetBSD. @@ -131,8 +140,8 @@ Booting Press C in GRUB to access the command line: -grub> **knetbsd -r wd0a (ahci0,netbsd1)/netbsd**\ -grub> **boot** + grub> knetbsd -r wd0a (ahci0,netbsd1)/netbsd + grub> boot NetBSD will start booting. Yay! diff --git a/docs/bsd/openbsd.md b/docs/bsd/openbsd.md @@ -4,7 +4,7 @@ NOTE: This guide was written for OpenBSD by the person who contributed it, but the libreboot project recommends LibertyBSD. LibertyBSD is a version of OpenBSD without proprietary software in the repositories (OpenBSD distributes firmware blobs for devices inside its kernel). Go -to the [LibertyBSD website](http://libertybsd.net/) \-- TODO: test on +to the [LibertyBSD website](http://libertybsd.net/) -- TODO: test on LibertyBSD and prioritise that in this guide. This section relates to preparing, booting and installing OpenBSD on @@ -37,18 +37,23 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in LibertyBSD or OpenBSD) If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or OpenBSD system, here is how to create the bootable LibertyBSD/OpenBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**\$ dmesg | tail**\ -Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ -**\$ disklabel sd3** +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + + $ dmesg | tail + +Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3: + + $ disklabel sd3 Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ -**\$ doas umount /dev/sd3i**\ +example: + + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the -OpenBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ -**\$ doas dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync**\ +OpenBSD installer to it with dd. For example: + + $ doas dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -78,20 +83,24 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in GNU+Linux) If you downloaded your ISO on a GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable OpenBSD USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**\$ dmesg**\ -Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ -**\$ lsblk** +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + + $ dmesg +Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is: + + $ lsblk Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ -**\$ sudo umount /dev/sdX\***\ -**\# umount /dev/sdX\*** +example: + + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX\* + # umount /dev/sdX\* dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your -distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ -**\$ sudo dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync**\ -**\# dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync** +distro ISO to it with dd. For example: + + $ sudo dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync + # dd if=install60.fs of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -105,8 +114,8 @@ Installing OpenBSD without full disk encryption Press C in GRUB to access the command line: -grub> **kopenbsd (usb0,openbsd1)/6.0/amd64/bsd.rd**\ -grub> **boot** + grub> kopenbsd (usb0,openbsd1)/6.0/amd64/bsd.rd + grub> boot It will start booting into the OpenBSD installer. Follow the normal process for installing OpenBSD. @@ -152,8 +161,8 @@ Booting Press C in GRUB to access the command line: -grub> **kopenbsd -r sd0a (ahci0,openbsd1)/bsd**\ -grub> **boot** + grub> kopenbsd -r sd0a (ahci0,openbsd1)/bsd + grub> boot OpenBSD will start booting. Yay! diff --git a/docs/depthcharge/index.md b/docs/depthcharge/index.md @@ -10,6 +10,7 @@ This section relates to the depthcharge payload used in libreboot. - Booting from different mediums - Showing device information - Warnings + - [Recovery mode screen](#recovery_mode_screen) - [Recovering from a bad state](#recovering_bad_state) - [Enabling developer mode](#enabling_developer_mode) @@ -185,26 +186,35 @@ security of the device. The following parameters can be configured: - Kernels signature verification: - - Enabled with:\ + - Enabled with: + \# **crossystem dev\_boot\_signed\_only=1** - - Disabled with:\ + - Disabled with: + \# **crossystem dev\_boot\_signed\_only=0** - External media boot: - - Enabled with:\ + - Enabled with: + \# **crossystem dev\_boot\_usb=1** - - Disabled with:\ + - Disabled with: + \# **crossystem dev\_boot\_usb=0** - Legacy payload boot: - - Enabled with:\ + - Enabled with: + \# **crossystem dev\_boot\_legacy=1** - - Disabled with:\ + - Disabled with: + \# **crossystem dev\_boot\_legacy=0** - Default boot medium: - - Internal storage:\ + - Internal storage: + \# **crossystem dev\_default\_boot=disk** - - External media:\ + - External media: + \# **crossystem dev\_default\_boot=usb** - - Legacy payload:\ + - Legacy payload: + \# **crossystem dev\_default\_boot=legacy** diff --git a/docs/future/index.md b/docs/future/index.md @@ -15,6 +15,7 @@ Table of contents - [i945 VRAM size](#i945_vram_size) - [LCD panels on i945 - fix incompatible panels](#lcd_i945_incompatibility) + - [i945 X60/T60 VBT implementation (experimental: testing)](#i945_vbt) - [IntelVbtTool results](#intelvbttool_results) - [Fallback patches for i945](#fallback_patches) @@ -158,12 +159,13 @@ working and nonworking panels. How to dump EDID: -\# **apt-get install i2c-tools**\ -\# **modprobe i2c-dev**\ -Find out the correct ID to use:\ -\# **i2cdetect -l**\ -Example:\ -\# **i2cdump -y 2 0x50** + # apt-get install i2c-tools + # modprobe i2c-dev +Find out the correct ID to use: + # i2cdetect -l\ +Example: + + # i2cdump -y 2 0x50 Working panel: EDID dump from LG-Philips LP150E05-A2K1: @@ -324,8 +326,9 @@ Get intelvbttool here: <http://review.coreboot.org/#/c/5842> Now dump a copy of the running VGA BIOS: **\$ sudo dd if=/dev/mem bs=64k of=runningvga.bin skip=12 count=1**\ -Then do (and record the output):\ -**\$ ./intelvbttool runningvga.bin > intelvbttool\_out** +Then do (and record the output): + + $ ./intelvbttool runningvga.bin > intelvbttool\_out Backup both files (runningvga.bin and intelvbttool\_out), renaming them to match the system and LCD panel used. diff --git a/docs/future/old.md b/docs/future/old.md @@ -12,6 +12,7 @@ Table of contents - [X60 native graphics initialization (backlight controls)](#x60_native_notes) + - [T60 native graphics initialization (backlight controls)](#t60_native_notes) - [i945: 3D fix (based on 5927) for kernel 3.12+ on @@ -43,8 +44,9 @@ That's all! **This has also been backported into libreboot 5th release (line 1233 in src/mainboard/lenovo/x60/i915io.c)**. GNUtoo (Denis Carikli) told me about the register **BLC\_PWM\_CTL** and that you could set it to control backlight. I read that address using devmem2 while -running the VBIOS:\ -**\# devmem2 0xe4361254 w** +running the VBIOS: + + # devmem2 0xe4361254 w The change is also included in libreboot 6. diff --git a/docs/git/index.md b/docs/git/index.md @@ -16,6 +16,7 @@ the git repository. - [Get the full source code from metadata (git clone)](#build_meta) - [How to build "bucts" (for LenovoBIOS X60/X60S/X60T/T60)](#build_bucts) + - [How to build "flashrom"](#build_flashrom) - [How to build the ROM images](#build) @@ -32,14 +33,14 @@ statically compiled executables for the utilities are included.** For Debian Stretch (may also work on Debian Jessie), you can run the -following command:\ -\$ **sudo ./oldbuild dependencies debian**\ +following command: + $ sudo ./oldbuild dependencies debian (this will also work in Devuan) -For Parabola, you can run the following command:\ -\$ **sudo ./oldbuild dependencies parabola**\ -or:\ -\# **./oldbuild dependencies parabola** +For Parabola, you can run the following command: + $ sudo ./oldbuild dependencies parabola\ +or: + # ./oldbuild dependencies parabola For other GNU+Linux distributions, you can adapt the existing scripts. @@ -63,22 +64,25 @@ First, [install the build dependencies](#build_dependencies). Since libreboot makes extensive use of git, you need to configure git properly. If you have not yet configured git, then the minimum -requirement is:\ -\$ **git config \--global user.name "Your Name"**\ -\$ **git config \--global user.email your@emailaddress.com**\ +requirement is: + + $ git config --global user.name "Your Name" + $ git config --global user.email your@emailaddress.com This is what will also appear in git logs if you ever commit your own changes to a given repository. For more information, see <http://git-scm.com/doc>. -Another nice config for you (optional, but recommended):\ -\$ **git config \--global core.editor nano**\ -\$ **git config \--global color.status auto**\ -\$ **git config \--global color.branch auto**\ -\$ **git config \--global color.interactive auto**\ -\$ **git config \--global color.diff auto** +Another nice config for you (optional, but recommended): + + $ git config --global core.editor nano + $ git config --global color.status auto + $ git config --global color.branch auto + $ git config --global color.interactive auto + $ git config --global color.diff auto -After that, run the script:\ -\$ **./download all** +After that, run the script: + + $ ./download all What this did was download everything (grub, coreboot, memtest86+, bucts, flashrom) at the versions last tested for this release, and patch @@ -136,11 +140,13 @@ If you have the binary release archive, you'll find executables under First, [install the build dependencies](#build_dependencies). -To build bucts, do this in the main directory:\ -\$ **./oldbuild module bucts** +To build bucts, do this in the main directory: + + $ ./oldbuild module bucts + +To statically compile it, do this: -To statically compile it, do this:\ -\$ **./oldbuild module bucts static** + $ ./oldbuild module bucts static The "builddeps" script in libreboot\_src also makes use of builddeps-bucts. @@ -167,11 +173,13 @@ flashrom from source, continue reading. First, [install the build dependencies](#build_dependencies). -To build it, do the following in the main directory:\ -\$ **./oldbuild module flashrom** +To build it, do the following in the main directory: -To statically compile it, do the following in the main directory:\ -\$ **./oldbuild module flashrom static** + $ ./oldbuild module flashrom + +To statically compile it, do the following in the main directory: + + $ ./oldbuild module flashrom static After you've done that, under ./flashrom/ you will find the following executables: @@ -214,25 +222,30 @@ First, [install the build dependencies](#build_dependencies). If you downloaded libreboot from git, refer to [\#build\_meta](#build_meta). -Build all of the components used in libreboot:\ -\$ **./oldbuild module all** +Build all of the components used in libreboot: + + $ ./oldbuild module all You can also build each modules separately, using *./oldbuild module -modulename*. To see the possible values for *modulename*, use:\ -\$ **./oldbuild module list** +modulename*. To see the possible values for *modulename*, use: + + $ ./oldbuild module list + +After that, build the ROM images (for all boards): -After that, build the ROM images (for all boards):\ -\$ **./oldbuild roms withgrub**\ + $ ./oldbuild roms withgrub Alternatively, you can build for a specific board or set of boards. For -example:\ -\$ **./oldbuild roms withgrub x60**\ -\$ **./oldbuild roms withgrub x200\_8mb**\ -\$ **./oldbuild roms withgrub x60 x200\_8mb**\ +example: + + $ ./oldbuild roms withgrub x60 + $ ./oldbuild roms withgrub x200\_8mb + $ ./oldbuild roms withgrub x60 x200\_8mb The list of board options can be found by looking at the directory names in **resources/libreboot/config/grub/**. -To clean (reverse) everything, do the following:\ -\$ **./oldbuild clean all** +To clean (reverse) everything, do the following: + + $ ./oldbuild clean all The ROM images will be stored under **bin/*payload*/**, where *payload* could be *grub*, *seabios*, or whatever other payload those images were @@ -257,26 +270,32 @@ that. Tag the current commit, and that version will appear in both the \${version} string on the directory under *release/oldbuildsystem/*, and in the file names of the archives. Otherwise, whatever git uses for *git -describe \--tags HEAD* will be used. +describe --tags HEAD* will be used. + +Utilities (static executables): -Utilities (static executables):\ -\$ **./oldbuild release util** + $ ./oldbuild release util -Archive containing flashrom and bucts source code:\ -\$ **./oldbuild release tobuild** +Archive containing flashrom and bucts source code: + + $ ./oldbuild release tobuild Documentation archive (**does not work on \_src release archive, only -git**):\ -\$ **./oldbuild release docs** +git**): + + $ ./oldbuild release docs -ROM image archives:\ -\$ **./oldbuild release roms** +ROM image archives: -Source code archive:\ -\$ **./oldbuild release src** + $ ./oldbuild release roms -SHA512 sums of all other release archives that have been generated:\ -\$ **./oldbuild release sha512sums** +Source code archive: + + $ ./oldbuild release src + +SHA512 sums of all other release archives that have been generated: + + $ ./oldbuild release sha512sums If you are building on an i686 host, this will build statically linked 32-bit binaries in the binary release archive that you created, for: @@ -304,9 +323,10 @@ libreboot\_util, for: - flashrom If you are building binaries on a live system or chroot (for -flashrom/bucts), you can use the following to statically link them:\ -\$ **./oldbuild module flashrom static**\ -\$ **./oldbuild module bucts static** +flashrom/bucts), you can use the following to statically link them: + + $ ./oldbuild module flashrom static + $ ./oldbuild module bucts static The same conditions as above apply for ARM (except, building bucts on ARM is pointless, and for flashrom you only need the normal executable @@ -315,8 +335,9 @@ an X60/T60 while lenovo bios is present, working around the security restrictions). The command that you used for generating the release archives will also -run the following command:\ -\$ **./oldbuild release tobuild**\ +run the following command: + + $ ./oldbuild release tobuild The archive **tobuild.tar.xz** will have been created under **release/oldbuildsystem/**, containing bucts, flashrom and all other required resources for building them. diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md b/docs/gnulinux/configuring_parabola.md @@ -19,6 +19,7 @@ Table of Contents - [Pacman command equivalents (compared to other package managers)](#pacman_commandequiv) - [your-freedom](#yourfreedom) + - [Add a user account](#useradd) - [System D](#systemd) - [Interesting repositories](#interesting_repos) @@ -94,10 +95,10 @@ careful about this when reading anything on the Arch wiki. Some of these steps require internet access. I'll go into networking -later but for now, I just connected my system to a switch and did:\ -\# **systemctl start dhcpcd.service**\ -You can stop it later by running:\ -\# **systemctl stop dhcpcd.service**\ +later but for now, I just connected my system to a switch and did: + # systemctl start dhcpcd.service +You can stop it later by running: + # systemctl stop dhcpcd.service\ For most people this should be enough, but if you don't have DHCP on your network then you should setup your network connection first:\ [Setup network connection in Parabola](#network) @@ -126,13 +127,15 @@ Updating Parabola {#pacman_update} ----------------- In the end, I didn't change my configuration for pacman. When you are -updating, resync with the latest package names/versions:\ -\# **pacman -Syy**\ +updating, resync with the latest package names/versions: + + # pacman -Syy (according to the wiki, -Syy is better than Sy because it refreshes the package list even if it appears to be up to date, which can be useful when switching to another mirror).\ -Then, update the system:\ -\# **pacman -Syu** +Then, update the system: + + # pacman -Syu **Before installing packages with 'pacman -S', always update first, using the notes above.** @@ -196,8 +199,9 @@ once in a while, to prevent it from growing too big (it's a cache of old package information, updated automatically when you do anything in pacman).** -To clean out all old packages that are cached:\ -\# **pacman -Sc** +To clean out all old packages that are cached: + + # pacman -Sc The wiki cautions that this should be used with care. For example, since older packages are deleted from the repo, if you encounter issues and @@ -205,8 +209,9 @@ want to revert back to an older package then it's useful to have the caches available. Only do this if you are sure that you won't need it. The wiki also mentions this method for removing everything from the -cache, including currently installed packages that are cached:\ -\# **pacman -Scc**\ +cache, including currently installed packages that are cached: + + # pacman -Scc This is inadvisable, since it means re-downloading the package again if you wanted to quickly re-install it. This should only be used when disk space is at a premium. @@ -251,10 +256,12 @@ access to the entire operating system. Read the entire document linked to above, and then continue. -Add your user:\ -\# **useradd -m -G wheel -s /bin/bash *yourusername***\ -Set a password:\ -\# **passwd *yourusername*** +Add your user: + + # useradd -m -G wheel -s /bin/bash *yourusername* +Set a password: + + # passwd *yourusername* Use of the *diceware method* is recommended, for generating secure passphrases (instead of passwords). @@ -280,8 +287,9 @@ sshd (openssh), dhcp, etc. There are countless others. the background behind the decision by Arch (Parabola's upstream supplier) to use systemd. -The manpage should also help:\ -\# **man systemd**\ +The manpage should also help: + + # man systemd The section on 'unit types' is especially useful. According to the wiki, systemd 'journal' keeps logs of a size up to @@ -300,8 +308,9 @@ The wiki also recommended a method for forwarding journal output to TTY 12 (accessible by pressing ctrl+alt+f12, and you use ctrl+alt+\[F1-F12\] to switch between terminals). I decided not to enable it. -Restart journald:\ -\# **systemctl restart systemd-journald** +Restart journald: + + # systemctl restart systemd-journald The wiki recommends that if the journal gets too large, you can also simply delete (rm -Rf) everything inside /var/log/journald/\* but @@ -311,10 +320,12 @@ delete older records when the journal size reaches it's limit (according to systemd developers). Finally, the wiki mentions 'temporary' files and the utility for -managing them.\ -\# **man systemd-tmpfiles**\ -The command for 'clean' is:\ -\# **systemd-tmpfiles \--clean**\ +managing them. + + # man systemd-tmpfiles +The command for 'clean' is: + + # systemd-tmpfiles --clean According to the manpage, this *"cleans all files and directories with an age parameter"*. According to the Arch wiki, this reads information in /etc/tmpfiles.d/ and /usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/ to know what actions to @@ -323,8 +334,9 @@ locations to get a better understanding. I looked in /etc/tmpfiles.d/ and found that it was empty on my system. However, /usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/ contained some files. The first one was -etc.conf, containing information and a reference to this manpage:\ -\# **man tmpfiles.d**\ +etc.conf, containing information and a reference to this manpage: + + # man tmpfiles.d Read that manpage, and then continue studying all the files. The systemd developers tell me that it isn't usually necessary to touch @@ -348,11 +360,13 @@ and below the 'extra' section add:\ *\[kernels\]\ Include = /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist* -Now sync with the repository:\ -\# **pacman -Syy** +Now sync with the repository: + + # pacman -Syy + +List all available packages in this repository: -List all available packages in this repository:\ -\# **pacman -Sl kernels** + # pacman -Sl kernels In the end, I decided not to install anything from it but I kept the repository enabled regardless. @@ -372,13 +386,15 @@ Read <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Configuring_Network>. This should be the same as the hostname that you set in /etc/hostname when installing Parabola. You can also do it with systemd (do so now, if -you like):\ -\# **hostnamectl set-hostname *yourhostname***\ +you like): + + # hostnamectl set-hostname *yourhostname* This writes the specified hostname to /etc/hostname. More information -can be found in these manpages:\ -\# **man hostname**\ -\# **info hostname**\ -\# **man hostnamectl** +can be found in these manpages: + + # man hostname + # info hostname + # man hostnamectl Add the same hostname to /etc/hosts, on each line. Example:\ *127.0.0.1 localhost.localdomain localhost myhostname\ @@ -399,8 +415,9 @@ According to the Arch wiki, [udev](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Udev) should already detect the ethernet chipset and load the driver for it automatically at boot time. You can check this in the *"Ethernet controller"* section when -running this command:\ -\# **lspci -v** +running this command: + + # lspci -v Look at the remaining sections *'Kernel driver in use'* and *'Kernel modules'*. In my case it was as follows:\ @@ -408,8 +425,9 @@ modules'*. In my case it was as follows:\ Kernel modules: e1000e* Check that the driver was loaded by issuing *dmesg | grep module\_name*. -In my case, I did:\ -\# **dmesg | grep e1000e** +In my case, I did: + + # dmesg | grep e1000e ### Network device names {#network_devicenames} @@ -430,8 +448,9 @@ instructions in [grub\_cbfs.html](grub_cbfs.html)). For background information, read [Predictable Network Interface Names](http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd/PredictableNetworkInterfaceNames/) -Show device names:\ -\# **ls /sys/class/net** +Show device names: + + # ls /sys/class/net Changing the device names is possible (I chose not to do it):\ <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Configuring_Network#Change_device_name> @@ -462,8 +481,9 @@ is important, so make sure to read them!** Install smartmontools (it can be used to check smart data. HDDs use non-free firmware inside, but it's transparent to you but the smart -data comes from it. Therefore, don't rely on it too much):\ -\# **pacman -S smartmontools**\ +data comes from it. Therefore, don't rely on it too much): + + # pacman -S smartmontools Read <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/S.M.A.R.T.> to learn how to use it. @@ -487,28 +507,34 @@ provide LXDE by default. Based on <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Xorg>. -Firstly, install it!\ -\# **pacman -S xorg-server**\ +Firstly, install it! + + # pacman -S xorg-server I also recommend installing this (contains lots of useful tools, -including *xrandr*):\ -\# **pacman -S xorg-server-utils** +including *xrandr*): + + # pacman -S xorg-server-utils Install the driver. For me this was *xf86-video-intel* on the ThinkPad -X60. T60 and macbook11/21 should be the same.\ -\# **pacman -S xf86-video-intel**\ -For other systems you can try:\ -\# **pacman -Ss xf86-video- | less**\ +X60. T60 and macbook11/21 should be the same. + + # pacman -S xf86-video-intel +For other systems you can try: + + # pacman -Ss xf86-video- | less Combined with looking at your *lspci* output, you can determine which driver is needed. By default, Xorg will revert to xf86-video-vesa which is a generic driver and doesn't provide true hardware acceleration. Other drivers (not just video) can be found by looking at the -*xorg-drivers* group:\ -\# **pacman -Sg xorg-drivers**\ +*xorg-drivers* group: + + # pacman -Sg xorg-drivers Mostly you will rely on a display manager, but in case you ever want to -start X without one:\ -\# **pacman -S xorg-xinit** +start X without one: + + # pacman -S xorg-xinit <optional>\    Arch wiki recommends installing these, for testing that X works:\ @@ -535,8 +561,9 @@ will notice that the layout you set in /etc/vconsole.conf earlier might not actually be the same in X. To see what layout you currently use, try this on a terminal emulator in -X:\ -\# **setxkbmap -print -verbose 10** +X: + + # setxkbmap -print -verbose 10 In my case, I wanted to use the Dvorak (UK) keyboard which is quite different from Xorg's default Qwerty (US) layout. @@ -582,36 +609,43 @@ would like to try something different, refer to Refer to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/LXDE>. -Install it, choosing 'all' when asked for the default package list:\ -\# **pacman -S lxde obconf** +Install it, choosing 'all' when asked for the default package list: -I didn't want the following, so I removed them:\ -\# **pacman -R lxmusic lxtask** + # pacman -S lxde obconf -I also lazily installed all fonts:\ -\# **pacman -S \$(pacman -Ssq ttf-)** +I didn't want the following, so I removed them: -And a mail client:\ -\# **pacman -S icedove** + # pacman -R lxmusic lxtask + +I also lazily installed all fonts: + + # pacman -S \$(pacman -Ssq ttf-) + +And a mail client: + + # pacman -S icedove In IceCat, go to *Preferences :: Advanced* and disable *GNU IceCat Health Report*. -I also like to install these:\ -\# **pacman -S xsensors stress htop** +I also like to install these: + + # pacman -S xsensors stress htop -Enable LXDM (the default display manager, providing a graphical login):\ -\# **systemctl enable lxdm.service**\ -It will start when you boot up the system. To start it now, do:\ -\# **systemctl start lxdm.service** +Enable LXDM (the default display manager, providing a graphical login): + + # systemctl enable lxdm.service +It will start when you boot up the system. To start it now, do: + + # systemctl start lxdm.service Log in with your standard (non-root) user that you created earlier. It is advisable to also create an xinitrc rule in case you ever want to start lxde without lxdm. Read <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Xinitrc>. -Open LXterminal:\ -\$ **cp /etc/skel/.xinitrc \~**\ +Open LXterminal: + $ cp /etc/skel/.xinitrc \~ Open .xinitrc and add the following plus a line break at the bottom of the file.\ *\# Probably not needed. The same locale info that we set before\ @@ -621,8 +655,8 @@ export LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8\ \ \# Start lxde desktop\ exec startlxde\ -* Now make sure that it is executable:\ -\$ **chmod +x .xinitrc** +* Now make sure that it is executable: + $ chmod +x .xinitrc [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -647,8 +681,9 @@ NOTE TO SELF: come back to this later. ### LXDE - screenlock {#lxde_screenlock} -Arch wiki recommends to use *xscreensaver*:\ -\# **pacman -S xscreensaver** +Arch wiki recommends to use *xscreensaver*: + + # pacman -S xscreensaver Under *Preferences :: Screensaver* in the LXDE menu, I chose *Mode: Blank Screen Only*, setting *Blank After*, *Cycle After* and *Lock @@ -698,31 +733,38 @@ cursor over it, it'll show information about the battery. Refer to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/LXDE#Network_Management>. Then I read: <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/NetworkManager>. -Install Network Manager:\ -\# **pacman -S networkmanager** +Install Network Manager: + + # pacman -S networkmanager + +You will also want the graphical applet: -You will also want the graphical applet:\ -\# **pacman -S network-manager-applet**\ + # pacman -S network-manager-applet Arch wiki says that an autostart rule will be written at */etc/xdg/autostart/nm-applet.desktop* I want to be able to use a VPN at some point, so the wiki tells me to -do:\ -\# **pacman -S networkmanager-openvpn** +do: + + # pacman -S networkmanager-openvpn LXDE uses openbox, so I refer to:\ <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/NetworkManager#Openbox>. -It tells me for the applet I need:\ -\# **pacman -S xfce4-notifyd gnome-icon-theme**\ -Also, for storing authentication details (wifi) I need:\ -\# **pacman -S gnome-keyring** +It tells me for the applet I need: + + # pacman -S xfce4-notifyd gnome-icon-theme +Also, for storing authentication details (wifi) I need: + + # pacman -S gnome-keyring + +I wanted to quickly enable networkmanager: + + # systemctl stop dhcpcd + # systemctl start NetworkManager +Enable NetworkManager at boot time: -I wanted to quickly enable networkmanager:\ -\# **systemctl stop dhcpcd**\ -\# **systemctl start NetworkManager**\ -Enable NetworkManager at boot time:\ -\# **systemctl enable NetworkManager** + # systemctl enable NetworkManager Restart LXDE (log out, and then log back in). diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_debian.md b/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_debian.md @@ -77,6 +77,7 @@ Choose 'Manual' partitioning: - Encryption key: passphrase - erase data: Yes (only choose 'No' if it's a new drive that doesn't contain your private data) + - Select 'configure encrypted volumes' - Create encrypted volumes - Select your partition @@ -185,12 +186,12 @@ At this point, you will have finished the installation. At your GRUB payload, press C to get to the command line. Do that:\ -grub> **cryptomount -a**\ -grub> **set root='lvm/matrix-rootvol'**\ + grub> cryptomount -a + grub> set root='lvm/matrix-rootvol'\ grub> **linux /vmlinuz root=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol cryptdevice=/dev/mapper/matrix-rootvol:root**\ -grub> **initrd /initrd.img**\ -grub> **boot** + grub> initrd /initrd.img + grub> boot @@ -200,8 +201,8 @@ ecryptfs If you didn't encrypt your home directory, then you can safely ignore this section. -Immediately after logging in, do that:\ -\$ **sudo ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase** +Immediately after logging in, do that: + $ sudo ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase This will be needed in the future if you ever need to recover your home directory from another system, so write it down and keep the note diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md b/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_parabola.md @@ -68,13 +68,14 @@ article](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Solid_State_Drives). Edit /etc/fstab later on when chrooted into your install. Also, read the whole article and keep all points in mind, adapting them for this guide. -Securely wipe the drive:\ -\# **dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sda; sync**\ +Securely wipe the drive: + # dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sda; sync + NOTE: If you have an SSD, only do this the first time. If it was already LUKS-encrypted before, use the info below to wipe the LUKS header. Also, check online for your SSD what the recommended erase block size is. For -example if it was 2MiB:\ -\# **dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sda bs=2M; sync** +example if it was 2MiB: + # dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sda bs=2M; sync If your drive was already LUKS encrypted (maybe you are re-installing your distro) then it is already 'wiped'. You should just wipe the LUKS @@ -82,8 +83,9 @@ header. <https://www.lisenet.com/2013/luks-add-keys-backup-and-restore-volume-header/> showed me how to do this. It recommends doing the first 3MiB. Now, that guide is recommending putting zero there. I'm going to use urandom. Do -this:\ -\# **head -c 3145728 /dev/urandom > /dev/sda; sync**\ +this: + + # head -c 3145728 /dev/urandom > /dev/sda; sync (Wiping the LUKS header is important, since it has hashed passphrases and so on. It's 'secure', but 'potentially' a risk). @@ -93,9 +95,10 @@ Change keyboard layout ---------------------- Parabola live shell assumes US Qwerty. If you have something different, -list the available keymaps and use yours:\ -\# **localectl list-keymaps**\ -\# **loadkeys LAYOUT**\ +list the available keymaps and use yours: + + # localectl list-keymaps + # loadkeys LAYOUT For me, LAYOUT would have been dvorak-uk. @@ -122,8 +125,9 @@ dm-mod ------ device-mapper will be used - a lot. Make sure that the kernel module is -loaded:\ -\# **modprobe dm-mod** +loaded: + + # modprobe dm-mod Create LUKS partition --------------------- @@ -136,8 +140,9 @@ prepared cryptsetup command below. Note that the iteration time is for security purposes (mitigates brute force attacks), so anything lower than 5 seconds is probably not ok. -I am using MBR partitioning, so I use cfdisk:\ -\# **cfdisk /dev/sda** +I am using MBR partitioning, so I use cfdisk: + + # cfdisk /dev/sda I create a single large sda1 filling the whole drive, leaving it as the default type 'Linux' (83). @@ -149,16 +154,19 @@ I am then directed to Parabola forces you to RTFM. Do that. -It tells me to run:\ -\# **cryptsetup benchmark** (for making sure the list below is +It tells me to run: + + # cryptsetup benchmark (for making sure the list below is populated)\ -Then:\ -\# **cat /proc/crypto**\ +Then: + + # cat /proc/crypto This gives me crypto options that I can use. It also provides a representation of the best way to set up LUKS (in this case, security is a priority; speed, a distant second). To gain a better understanding, I -am also reading:\ -\# **man cryptsetup** +am also reading: + + # man cryptsetup Following that page, based on my requirements, I do the following based on @@ -167,8 +175,8 @@ Reading through, it seems like Serpent (encryption) and Whirlpool (hash) is the best option. I am initializing LUKS with the following:\ -\# **cryptsetup -v \--cipher serpent-xts-plain64 \--key-size 512 \--hash -whirlpool \--iter-time 500 \--use-random \--verify-passphrase luksFormat +\# **cryptsetup -v --cipher serpent-xts-plain64 --key-size 512 --hash +whirlpool --iter-time 500 --use-random --verify-passphrase luksFormat /dev/sda1** Choose a **secure** passphrase here. Ideally lots of lowercase/uppercase numbers, letters, symbols etc all in a random pattern. The password length should be as long as you are able to handle @@ -184,30 +192,37 @@ Create LVM Now I refer to <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/LVM>. -Open the LUKS partition:\ -\# **cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda1 lvm**\ +Open the LUKS partition: + + # cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda1 lvm (it will be available at /dev/mapper/lvm) -Create LVM partition:\ -\# **pvcreate /dev/mapper/lvm**\ -Show that you just created it:\ -\# **pvdisplay** +Create LVM partition: + + # pvcreate /dev/mapper/lvm +Show that you just created it: + + # pvdisplay Now I create the volume group, inside of which the logical volumes will -be created:\ -\# **vgcreate matrix /dev/mapper/lvm**\ +be created: + + # vgcreate matrix /dev/mapper/lvm (volume group name is 'matrix' - choose your own name, if you like) -Show that you created it:\ -\# **vgdisplay** +Show that you created it: -Now create the logical volumes:\ -\# **lvcreate -L 2G matrix -n swapvol** (2G swap partition, named + # vgdisplay + +Now create the logical volumes: + + # lvcreate -L 2G matrix -n swapvol (2G swap partition, named swapvol)\ Again, choose your own name if you like. Also, make sure to choose a swap size of your own needs. It basically depends on how much RAM you have installed. I refer to -<http://www.linux.com/news/software/applications/8208-all-about-linux-swap-space>.\ -\# **lvcreate -l +100%FREE matrix -n root** (single large partition in +<http://www.linux.com/news/software/applications/8208-all-about-linux-swap-space>. + + # lvcreate -l +100%FREE matrix -n root (single large partition in the rest of the space, named root)\ You can also be flexible here, for example you can specify a /boot, a /, a /home, a /var, a /usr, etc. For example, if you will be running a @@ -216,24 +231,29 @@ fills up with logs, it won't crash your system). For a home/laptop system (typical use case), a root and a swap will do (really). Verify that the logical volumes were created, using the following -command:\ -\# **lvdisplay** +command: + + # lvdisplay Create / and swap partitions, and mount --------------------------------------- -For the swapvol LV I use:\ -\# **mkswap /dev/mapper/matrix-swapvol**\ -Activate swap:\ -\# **swapon /dev/matrix/swapvol** +For the swapvol LV I use: + + # mkswap /dev/mapper/matrix-swapvol +Activate swap: + + # swapon /dev/matrix/swapvol + +For the root LV I use: -For the root LV I use:\ -\# **mkfs.btrfs /dev/mapper/matrix-root** + # mkfs.btrfs /dev/mapper/matrix-root -Mount the root (/) partition:\ -\# **mount /dev/matrix/root /mnt** +Mount the root (/) partition: + + # mount /dev/matrix/root /mnt @@ -247,19 +267,21 @@ Now I am following the rest of <https://wiki.parabolagnulinux.org/Installation_Guide>. I also cross referenced <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Installation_guide>. -Create /home and /boot on root mountpoint:\ -\# **mkdir -p /mnt/home**\ -\# **mkdir -p /mnt/boot** +Create /home and /boot on root mountpoint: + + # mkdir -p /mnt/home + # mkdir -p /mnt/boot Once all the remaining partitions, if any, have been mounted, the devices are ready to install Parabola. In **/etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist**, comment out all lines except the Server line closest to where you are (I chose the UK Parabola server (main -server)) and then did:\ -\# **pacman -Syy**\ -\# **pacman -Syu**\ -\# **pacman -Sy pacman** (and then I did the other 2 steps above, +server)) and then did: + + # pacman -Syy + # pacman -Syu + # pacman -Sy pacman (and then I did the other 2 steps above, again)\ In my case I did the steps in the next paragraph, and followed the steps in this paragraph again. @@ -273,8 +295,8 @@ signing and verifying packages:\    \# **pacman -Sy parabola-keyring**\    It says that if you get GPG errors, then it's probably an expired key and, therefore, you should do:\ -   \# **pacman-key \--populate parabola**\ -   \# **pacman-key \--refresh-keys**\ +   \# **pacman-key --populate parabola**\ +   \# **pacman-key --refresh-keys**\    \# **pacman -Sy parabola-keyring**\    To be honest, you should do the above anyway. Parabola has a lot of maintainers, and a lot of keys. Really!\ @@ -286,7 +308,7 @@ manually set the correct time\    \# **date MMDDhhmm\[\[CC\]YY\]\[.ss\]**\    I also had to install:\    \# **pacman -S archlinux-keyring**\ -   \# **pacman-key \--populate archlinux**\ +   \# **pacman-key --populate archlinux**\    In my case I saw some conflicting files reported in pacman, stopping me from using it.\    I deleted the files that it mentioned and then it worked. @@ -310,58 +332,71 @@ Configure the system Generate an fstab - UUIDs are used because they have certain advantages (see <https://wiki.parabola.nu/Fstab#Identifying_filesystems>. If you -prefer labels instead, replace the -U option with -L):\ -\# **genfstab -U -p /mnt >> /mnt/etc/fstab**\ -Check the created file:\ -\# **cat /mnt/etc/fstab**\ +prefer labels instead, replace the -U option with -L): + + # genfstab -U -p /mnt >> /mnt/etc/fstab +Check the created file: + + # cat /mnt/etc/fstab (If there are any errors, edit the file. Do **NOT** run the genfstab command again!) -Chroot into new system:\ -\# **arch-chroot /mnt /bin/bash** +Chroot into new system: + + # arch-chroot /mnt /bin/bash -It's a good idea to have this installed:\ -\# **pacman -S linux-libre-lts** +It's a good idea to have this installed: + + # pacman -S linux-libre-lts It was also suggested that you should install this kernel (read up on -what GRSEC is):\ -\# **pacman -S linux-libre-grsec** +what GRSEC is): + + # pacman -S linux-libre-grsec This is another kernel that sits inside /boot, which you can use. LTS means 'long-term support'. These are so-called 'stable' kernels that can be used as a fallback during updates, if a bad kernel causes issues for you. -Parabola does not have wget. This is sinister. Install it:\ -\# **pacman -S wget** +Parabola does not have wget. This is sinister. Install it: -Locale:\ -\# **vi /etc/locale.gen**\ + # pacman -S wget + +Locale: + + # vi /etc/locale.gen Uncomment your needed localisations. For example en\_GB.UTF-8 (UTF-8 is -highly recommended over other options).\ -\# **locale-gen**\ -\# **echo LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8 > /etc/locale.conf**\ -\# **export LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8** +highly recommended over other options). + + # locale-gen + # echo LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8 > /etc/locale.conf + # export LANG=en\_GB.UTF-8 -Console font and keymap:\ -\# **vi /etc/vconsole.conf**\ +Console font and keymap: + + # vi /etc/vconsole.conf In my case: KEYMAP=dvorak-uk FONT=lat9w-16 -Time zone:\ -\# **ln -s /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/London /etc/localtime**\ +Time zone: + + # ln -s /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/London /etc/localtime (Replace Zone and Subzone to your liking. See /usr/share/zoneinfo) -Hardware clock:\ -\# **hwclock \--systohc \--utc** +Hardware clock: + + # hwclock --systohc --utc Hostname: Write your hostname to /etc/hostname. For example, if your -hostname is parabola:\ -\# **echo parabola > /etc/hostname**\ -Add the same hostname to /etc/hosts:\ -\# **vi /etc/hosts**\ +hostname is parabola: + + # echo parabola > /etc/hostname +Add the same hostname to /etc/hosts: + + # vi /etc/hosts #<ip-address> <hostname.domain.org> <hostname> 127.0.0.1 localhost.localdomain localhost parabola @@ -374,8 +409,9 @@ Mkinitcpio: Configure /etc/mkinitcpio.conf as needed (see <https://wiki.parabola.nu/Mkinitcpio>). Runtime modules can be found in /usr/lib/initcpio/hooks, and build hooks can be found in /usr/lib/initcpio/install. (\# **mkinitcpio -H hookname** gives -information about each hook.) Specifically, for this use case:\ -\# **vi /etc/mkinitcpio.conf**\ +information about each hook.) Specifically, for this use case: + + # vi /etc/mkinitcpio.conf Then modify the file like so: - MODULES="i915" @@ -399,19 +435,24 @@ Then modify the file like so: Now using mkinitcpio, you can create the kernel and ramdisk for booting with (this is different from Arch, specifying linux-libre instead of -linux):\ -\# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre**\ -Also do it for linux-libre-lts:\ -\# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-lts**\ -Also do it for linux-libre-grsec:\ -\# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-grsec** +linux): + + # mkinitcpio -p linux-libre +Also do it for linux-libre-lts: + + # mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-lts +Also do it for linux-libre-grsec: + + # mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-grsec Set the root password: At the time of writing, Parabola used SHA512 by default for its password hashing. I referred to -<https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/SHA_password_hashes>.\ -\# **vi /etc/pam.d/passwd**\ -Add rounds=65536 at the end of the uncommented 'password' line.\ -\# **passwd root**\ +<https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/SHA_password_hashes>. + + # vi /etc/pam.d/passwd +Add rounds=65536 at the end of the uncommented 'password' line. + + # passwd root Make sure to set a secure password! Also, it must never be the same as your LUKS password. @@ -425,8 +466,9 @@ Extra security tweaks Based on <https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Security>. -Restrict access to important directories:\ -\# **chmod 700 /boot /etc/{iptables,arptables}** +Restrict access to important directories: + + # chmod 700 /boot /etc/{iptables,arptables} Lockout user after three failed login attempts:\ Edit the file /etc/pam.d/system-login and comment out that line:\ @@ -435,8 +477,9 @@ Or just delete it. Above it, put:\ *auth required pam\_tally.so deny=2 unlock\_time=600 onerr=succeed file=/var/log/faillog*\ To unlock a user manually (if a password attempt is failed 3 times), -do:\ -\# **pam\_tally \--user *theusername* \--reset** What the above +do: + + # pam\_tally --user *theusername* --reset What the above configuration does is lock the user out for 10 minutes, if they make 3 failed login attempts. @@ -449,21 +492,25 @@ don't really need sudo. Unmount, reboot! ---------------- -Exit from chroot:\ -\# **exit** +Exit from chroot: + + # exit + +unmount: -unmount:\ -\# **umount -R /mnt**\ -\# **swapoff -a** + # umount -R /mnt + # swapoff -a -deactivate the lvm lv's:\ -\# **lvchange -an /dev/matrix/root**\ -\# **lvchange -an /dev/matrix/swapvol**\ +deactivate the lvm lv's: -Lock the encrypted partition (close it):\ -\# **cryptsetup luksClose lvm** + # lvchange -an /dev/matrix/root + # lvchange -an /dev/matrix/swapvol -\# **shutdown -h now**\ +Lock the encrypted partition (close it): + + # cryptsetup luksClose lvm + + # shutdown -h now Remove the installation media, then boot up again. @@ -475,12 +522,12 @@ Initially you will have to boot manually. Press C to get to the GRUB command line. The underlined parts are optional (using those 2 underlines will boot lts kernel instead of normal). -grub> **cryptomount -a**\ -grub> **set root='lvm/matrix-root'**\ + grub> cryptomount -a + grub> set root='lvm/matrix-root'\ grub> **linux /boot/vmlinuz-linux-libre-lts root=/dev/matrix/root cryptdevice=/dev/sda1:root**\ -grub> **initrd /boot/initramfs-linux-libre-lts.img**\ -grub> **boot**\ + grub> initrd /boot/initramfs-linux-libre-lts.img + grub> boot\ You could also make it load /boot/vmlinuz-linux-libre-grsec and /boot/initramfs-linux-libre-grsec.img @@ -518,17 +565,19 @@ possibility of bricking your device! I will go for the re-flash option here. Firstly, cd to the libreboot\_util/cbfstool/{armv7l i686 x86\_64} directory. Dump the current firmware - where *libreboot.rom* is an example: make sure to -adapt:\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom**\ +adapt: + + # flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom If flashrom complains about multiple flash chips detected, add a *-c* option at the end, with the name of your chosen chip is quotes.\ You can check if everything is in there (*grub.cfg* and *grubtest.cfg* -would be really nice):\ -\$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom print**\ -Extract grubtest.cfg:\ -\$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg**\ -And modify:\ -\$ **vi grubtest.cfg** +would be really nice): + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom print +Extract grubtest.cfg: + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg\ +And modify: + + $ vi grubtest.cfg In grubtest.cfg, inside the 'Load Operating System' menu entry, change the contents to: @@ -556,19 +605,22 @@ detected LUKS volumes. You can also specify -u UUID or -a (device). hardening your GRUB configuration, for security purposes. Save your changes in grubtest.cfg, then delete the unmodified config -from the ROM image:\ -\$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grubtest.cfg**\ +from the ROM image: + + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grubtest.cfg and insert the modified grubtest.cfg:\ \$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg -t raw**\ Now refer to <http://libreboot.org/docs/install/#flashrom>. Cd (up) to -the libreboot\_util directory and update the flash chip contents:\ -\# **./flash update libreboot.rom**\ +the libreboot\_util directory and update the flash chip contents: + + # ./flash update libreboot.rom Ocassionally, coreboot changes the name of a given board. If flashrom complains about a board mismatch, but you are sure that you chose the -correct ROM image, then run this alternative command:\ -\# **./flash forceupdate libreboot.rom**\ +correct ROM image, then run this alternative command: + + # ./flash forceupdate libreboot.rom You should see "Verifying flash\... VERIFIED." written at the end of the flashrom output. @@ -598,22 +650,26 @@ with the following command:\ \$ **sed -e 's:(cbfsdisk)/grub.cfg:(cbfsdisk)/grubtest.cfg:g' -e 's:Switch to grub.cfg:Switch to grubtest.cfg:g' < grubtest.cfg > grub.cfg**\ -Delete the grub.cfg that remained inside the ROM:\ -\$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grub.cfg**\ -Add the modified version that you just made:\ -\$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grub.cfg -f grub.cfg -t raw**\ +Delete the grub.cfg that remained inside the ROM: + + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grub.cfg +Add the modified version that you just made: + + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grub.cfg -f grub.cfg -t raw Now you have a modified ROM. Once more, refer to <http://libreboot.org/docs/install/#flashrom>. Cd to the libreboot\_util -directory and update the flash chip contents:\ -\# **./flash update libreboot.rom**\ +directory and update the flash chip contents: + + # ./flash update libreboot.rom And wait for the "Verifying flash\... VERIFIED." Once you have done that, shut down and then boot up with your new configuration. When done, delete GRUB (remember, we only needed it for the *grub-mkpasswd-pbkdf2* utility; GRUB is already part of libreboot, -flashed alongside it as a *payload*):\ -\# **pacman -R grub** +flashed alongside it as a *payload*): + + # pacman -R grub @@ -637,18 +693,22 @@ putting a keyfile inside initramfs would be a bad idea).\ Boot up and login as root or your user. Then generate the key file:\ \# **dd bs=512 count=4 if=/dev/urandom of=/etc/mykeyfile iflag=fullblock**\ -Insert it into the luks volume:\ -\# **cryptsetup luksAddKey /dev/sdX /etc/mykeyfile**\ +Insert it into the luks volume: + + # cryptsetup luksAddKey /dev/sdX /etc/mykeyfile and enter your LUKS passphrase when prompted. Add the keyfile to the -initramfs by adding it to FILES in /etc/mkinitcpio.conf. For example:\ -\# **FILES="/etc/mykeyfile"**\ -Create the initramfs image from scratch:\ -\# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre**\ -\# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-lts**\ -\# **mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-grsec**\ +initramfs by adding it to FILES in /etc/mkinitcpio.conf. For example: + + # FILES="/etc/mykeyfile" +Create the initramfs image from scratch: + + # mkinitcpio -p linux-libre + # mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-lts + # mkinitcpio -p linux-libre-grsec Add the following to your grub.cfg - you are now able to do that, see -above! -, or add it in the kernel command line for GRUB:\ -\# **cryptkey=rootfs:/etc/mykeyfile**\ +above! -, or add it in the kernel command line for GRUB: + + # cryptkey=rootfs:/etc/mykeyfile \ You can also place this inside the grub.cfg that exists in CBFS: [grub\_cbfs.html](grub_cbfs.html). diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/grub_boot_installer.md b/docs/gnulinux/grub_boot_installer.md @@ -28,20 +28,25 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in GNU+Linux) If you downloaded your ISO on an existing GNU+Linux system, here is how to create the bootable GNU+Linux USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**\$ dmesg**\ -Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is:\ -**\$ lsblk** +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + + $ dmesg + +Check lsblk to confirm which drive it is: + + $ lsblk Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ -**\$ sudo umount /dev/sdX\***\ -**\# umount /dev/sdX\*** +example: + + $ sudo umount /dev/sdX\* + # umount /dev/sdX\* dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing your -distro ISO to it with dd. For example:\ -**\$ sudo dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync**\ -**\# dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync** +distro ISO to it with dd. For example: + + $ sudo dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync + # dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -71,18 +76,22 @@ Prepare the USB drive (in LibertyBSD or OpenBSD) If you downloaded your ISO on a LibertyBSD or OpenBSD system, here is how to create the bootable GNU+Linux USB drive: -Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg:\ -**\$ dmesg | tail**\ -Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3:\ -**\$ disklabel sd3** +Connect the USB drive. Check dmesg: + + $ dmesg | tail +Check to confirm which drive it is, for example, if you think its sd3: + + $ disklabel sd3 Check that it wasn't automatically mounted. If it was, unmount it. For -example:\ -**\$ doas umount /dev/sd3i**\ +example: + + $ doas umount /dev/sd3i dmesg told you what device it is. Overwrite the drive, writing the -OpenBSD installer to it with dd. For example:\ -**\$ doas dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync**\ +OpenBSD installer to it with dd. For example: + + $ doas dd if=gnulinux.iso of=/dev/rsdXc bs=1M; sync You should now be able to boot the installer from your USB drive. Continue reading, for information about how to do that. @@ -146,13 +155,13 @@ distribution it is that you are trying to install.* If the ISOLINUX parser or *Search for GRUB configuration* options won't work, then press C in GRUB to access the command line.\ -grub> **ls**\ + grub> ls Get the device from above output, eg (usb0). Example:\ -grub> **cat (usb0)/isolinux/isolinux.cfg**\ + grub> cat (usb0)/isolinux/isolinux.cfg\ Either this will show the ISOLINUX menuentries for that ISO, or link to other .cfg files, for example /isolinux/foo.cfg.\ If it did that, then you do:\ -grub> **cat (usb0)/isolinux/foo.cfg**\ + grub> cat (usb0)/isolinux/foo.cfg And so on, until you find the correct menuentries for ISOLINUX. **The file */isolinux/foo.cfg* is a fictional example. Do not actually use this example, unless you actually have that file, if it is @@ -173,10 +182,10 @@ Now look at the ISOLINUX menuentry. It'll look like:\ append PARAMETERS initrd=/path/to/initrd MAYBE\_MORE\_PARAMETERS\ ** GRUB works the same way, but in it's own way. Example GRUB commands:\ -grub> **set root='usb0'**\ -grub> **linux /path/to/kernel PARAMETERS MAYBE\_MORE\_PARAMETERS**\ -grub> **initrd /path/to/initrd**\ -grub> **boot**\ + grub> set root='usb0'\ + grub> linux /path/to/kernel PARAMETERS MAYBE\_MORE\_PARAMETERS + grub> initrd /path/to/initrd + grub> boot Note: *usb0* may be incorrect. Check the output of the *ls* command in GRUB, to see a list of USB devices/partitions. Of course this will vary from distro to distro. If you did all of that correctly, then it should diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md b/docs/gnulinux/grub_cbfs.md @@ -45,6 +45,7 @@ Table of Contents + Introduction ------------ @@ -122,8 +123,8 @@ Acquire the necessary utilities {#tools} Use ***cbfstool*** and ***flashrom***. There are available in the *libreboot\_util* release archive, or they can be compiled (see [../git/\#build\_flashrom](../git/#build_flashrom)). Flashrom is also -available from the repositories:\ -\# **pacman -S flashrom** +available from the repositories: + # pacman -S flashrom [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -138,12 +139,13 @@ flashed. For the purpose of this tutorial it is assumed that your ROM image file is named *libreboot.rom*, so please make sure to adapt. ROM images are included pre-compiled in libreboot. You can also dump -your current firmware, using flashrom:\ -\$ **sudo flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom**\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom**\ +your current firmware, using flashrom: + $ sudo flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom + # flashrom -p internal -r libreboot.rom If you are told to specify the chip, add the option **-c {your chip}** -to the command, for example:\ -\# **flashrom -c MX25L6405 -p internal -r libreboot.rom** +to the command, for example: + + # flashrom -c MX25L6405 -p internal -r libreboot.rom [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -152,8 +154,9 @@ to the command, for example:\ Extract grubtest.cfg from the ROM image {#extract_testconfig} --------------------------------------- -You can check the contents of the ROM image, inside CBFS:\ -**\$ cd \.../libreboot\_util/cbfstool** **\$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom +You can check the contents of the ROM image, inside CBFS: + + $ cd \.../libreboot\_util/cbfstool** $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom print** The files *grub.cfg* and *grubtest.cfg* should be present. grub.cfg is @@ -161,8 +164,9 @@ loaded by default, with a menuentry for switching to grubtest.cfg. In this tutorial, you will first modify and test *grubtest.cfg*. This is to reduce the possibility of bricking your device, so DO NOT SKIP THIS! -Extract grubtest.cfg from the ROM image:\ -**\$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg** +Extract grubtest.cfg from the ROM image: + + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg Modify the grubtest.cfg accordingly. @@ -174,8 +178,9 @@ Re-insert the modified grubtest.cfg into the ROM image {#reinsert_modified_testc ------------------------------------------------------ Once your grubtest.cfg is modified and saved, delete the unmodified -config from the ROM image:\ -**\$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grubtest.cfg** +config from the ROM image: + + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grubtest.cfg Next, insert the modified version:\ **\$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grubtest.cfg -f grubtest.cfg -t @@ -190,12 +195,12 @@ Testing **Now you have a modified ROM. Refer back to [../install/\#flashrom](../install/#flashrom) for information on how to -flash it.\ -\$ **cd /libreboot\_util** \# **./flash update libreboot.rom**\ +flash it. + $ cd /libreboot\_util** \# **./flash update libreboot.rom\ Ocassionally, coreboot changes the name of a given board. If flashrom complains about a board mismatch, but you are sure that you chose the -correct ROM image, then run this alternative command:\ -\# **./flash forceupdate libreboot.rom**\ +correct ROM image, then run this alternative command: + # ./flash forceupdate libreboot.rom You should see **"Verifying flash\... VERIFIED."** written at the end of the flashrom output. Once you have done that, shut down and then boot up with your new test configuration.** @@ -227,11 +232,13 @@ the already modified config). From /libreboot\_util/cbfstool, do:\ 's:Switch to grub.cfg:Switch to grubtest.cfg:g' < grubtest.cfg > grub.cfg**\ -Delete the grub.cfg that remained inside the ROM:\ -**\$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grub.cfg** +Delete the grub.cfg that remained inside the ROM: + + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom remove -n grub.cfg + +Add the modified version that you just made: -Add the modified version that you just made:\ -**\$ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grub.cfg -f grub.cfg -t raw** + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom add -n grub.cfg -f grub.cfg -t raw **Now you have a modified ROM. Again, refer back to [../install/\#flashrom](../install/#flashrom) for information on how to diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/grub_hardening.md b/docs/gnulinux/grub_hardening.md @@ -31,6 +31,7 @@ image: cbfstool my.rom extract -n grubtest.cfg -f my.grubtest.cfg cbfstool my.rom remove -n grubtest.cfg + Helpful links: - [GRUB manual @@ -77,7 +78,7 @@ remember and easier to crack. Diceware passphrases are harder to crack because of far higher entropy (there are many words available to use, but only about 50 commonly used symbols in pass*words*). -\--> +--> The GRUB password can be entered in two ways: - plaintext @@ -105,7 +106,7 @@ As enabling password protection as above means that you have to input it on every single boot, we will make one menu entry work without it. Remember that we will have GPG signing active, thus a potential attacker will not be able to boot an arbitrary operating system. We do this by -adding option **\--unrestricted** to a menuentry definition: +adding option **--unrestricted** to a menuentry definition: menuentry 'Load Operating System (incl. fully encrypted disks) [o]' --hotkey='o' --unrestricted { ... diff --git a/docs/gnulinux/index.md b/docs/gnulinux/index.md @@ -10,6 +10,7 @@ instructions have yet to be written.** - [How to install GNU+Linux on a libreboot system](grub_boot_installer.html) + - [How to replace the default GRUB configuration file on a libreboot system](grub_cbfs.html) - [Installing Parabola or Arch GNU+Linux-libre with full disk diff --git a/docs/grub/index.md b/docs/grub/index.md @@ -11,6 +11,7 @@ This section relates to the GRUB payload used in libreboot. + Changing the background image in GRUB {#grub_background} ===================================== @@ -45,10 +46,11 @@ one](http://sourceforge.net/projects/dejavu/files/dejavu/2.34/dejavu-fonts-ttf-2 This is a free font that is also contained in GNU+Linux distributions like Debian, Devuan or Parabola. -**\$ cd libreboot\_src/grub**\ + $ cd libreboot\_src/grub compile grub (the build scripts info on how to do this)\ -come back out into libreboot\_src/resources/grub:\ -**\$ cd ../libreboot\_src/resources/grub/font** +come back out into libreboot\_src/resources/grub: + + $ cd ../libreboot\_src/resources/grub/font I took Dejavu Sans Mono from dejavu (included in this version of libreboot) and did:\ @@ -75,8 +77,9 @@ Custom keyboard layout in GRUB (for reference) {#grub_custom_keyboard} Keymaps are stored in resources/utilities/grub-assemble/keymap/. -Example (French Azerty):\ -**\$ ckbcomp fr > frazerty**\ +Example (French Azerty): + + $ ckbcomp fr > frazerty \ Go in grub directory:\ **cat frazerty | ./grub/grub-mklayout -o frazerty.gkb** @@ -104,7 +107,7 @@ ukdvorak had to be created manually, based on usdvorak. diff them (under resources/utilities/grub-assemble/keymap/original) to see how ukdvorak file was created -**\$ cat ukdvorak | ./grub/grub-mklayout -o ukdvorak.gkb** + $ cat ukdvorak | ./grub/grub-mklayout -o ukdvorak.gkb [Back to top of page](#pagetop) diff --git a/docs/hardware/dock.md b/docs/hardware/dock.md @@ -8,6 +8,7 @@ Usually when people do full disk encryption, it's not really full disk, instead they still have a /boot in clear. + So an evil maid attack can still be done, in two passes: 1) Clone the hdd, Infect the initramfs or the kernel. 2) Wait for the user to enter its password, recover the password, diff --git a/docs/hardware/index.md b/docs/hardware/index.md @@ -6,6 +6,7 @@ This section relates to hardware maintenance on supported targets. - [ThinkPad X60/X60s/X60T: Change keyboard](x60_keyboard.html) (the procedure on X200/X200S/X200T is almost identical) + - [ThinkPad X60/X60S: change the fan/heatsink](x60_heatsink.html) - [ThinkPad X60/X60s: How to change the LCD panel](x60_lcd_change.html) (incomplete. pics only for now) diff --git a/docs/hardware/t60_heatsink.md b/docs/hardware/t60_heatsink.md @@ -11,6 +11,7 @@ Hardware requirements {#hardware_requirements} - rubbing alcohol or isopropyl alcohol, and thermal compound for changing CPU heatsink (procedure involves removing heatsink) + - thermal compound/paste (Arctic MX-4 is good. Others are also good.) diff --git a/docs/hardware/t60_security.md b/docs/hardware/t60_security.md @@ -231,6 +231,7 @@ Not covered yet: - Disable flashing the ethernet firmware - Disable SPI flash writes (can be re-enabled by unsoldering two parts) + - Disable use of xrandr/edid on external monitor (cut 2 pins on VGA) - Disable docking station (might be possible to do it in software, in coreboot upstream as a Kconfig option) @@ -248,7 +249,8 @@ half of the video to see how to do the above. Also not covered yet: --------------------- -- Intrusion detection: randomized seal on screws\ +- Intrusion detection: randomized seal on screws + Just put nail polish with lot of glider on the important screws, take some good pictures. Keep the pictueres and make sure of their integrity. Compare the nail polish with the pictures before powering diff --git a/docs/hardware/x60_heatsink.md b/docs/hardware/x60_heatsink.md @@ -22,6 +22,7 @@ Hardware requirements {#hardware_requirements} - your new fan and/or heatsink - CPU thermal compound (some say Arctic MX-4 is good, others are also 'ok') + - Something to spread the paste with diff --git a/docs/hardware/x60_security.md b/docs/hardware/x60_security.md @@ -137,6 +137,7 @@ Not covered yet: - Disable flashing the ethernet firmware - Disable SPI flash writes (can be re-enabled by unsoldering two parts) + - Disable use of xrandr/edid on external monitor (cut 2 pins on VGA) - Disable docking station (might be possible to do it in software, in coreboot upstream as a Kconfig option) @@ -152,7 +153,8 @@ half of the video to see how to do the above. Also not covered yet: --------------------- -- Intrusion detection: randomized seal on screws\ +- Intrusion detection: randomized seal on screws + Just put nail polish with lot of glider on the important screws, take some good pictures. Keep the pictueres and make sure of their integrity. Compare the nail polish with the pictures before powering diff --git a/docs/hcl/c201.md b/docs/hcl/c201.md @@ -22,6 +22,7 @@ Flashing instructions can be found at - [Considerations about ChromeOS and free operating systems](#os) - [Caution: Video acceleration requires a non-free blob, software rendering can be used instead.](#videoblobs) + - [Caution: WiFi requires a non-free blob, a USB dongle can be used instead.](#wifiblobs) - [EC firmware is free software!](#ec) diff --git a/docs/hcl/d945gclf.md b/docs/hcl/d945gclf.md @@ -33,6 +33,7 @@ Remarks about vendor bios: vendor bios is very bad. It cannot boot from any HDD wether it is connected to the SATA port or USB. With libreboot it works just fine. + - The vendor bios write protects the flash so it requires external flashing to install libreboot on this device. Once libreboot is flashed there is no problem to update the firmware internally diff --git a/docs/hcl/gm45_remove_me.md b/docs/hcl/gm45_remove_me.md @@ -38,12 +38,13 @@ factory.bin dump. ich9gen executables can be found under ./ich9deblob/ statically compiled in libreboot\_util. If you are using src or git, build ich9gen from -source with:\ -\$ **./oldbuild module ich9deblob**\ +source with: + $ ./oldbuild module ich9deblob + The executable will appear under resources/utilities/ich9deblob/ -Run:\ -\$ **./ich9gen** +Run: + $ ./ich9gen Running ich9gen this way (without any arguments) generates a default descriptor+gbe image with a generic MAC address. You probably don't @@ -68,8 +69,9 @@ the little sticker on the bottom/base of the laptop. On GM45 laptops that use flash descriptors, the MAC address or the onboard ethernet chipset is flashed (inside the ROM image). You should generate a descriptor+gbe image with your own MAC address inside (with -the Gbe checksum updated to match). Run:\ -\$ **./ich9gen \--macaddress XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX**\ +the Gbe checksum updated to match). Run: + + $ ./ich9gen --macaddress XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX (replace the XX chars with the hexadecimal chars in the MAC address that you want) @@ -163,8 +165,9 @@ regions for your libreboot ROM image. If you are working with libreboot\_src (or git), you can find the source under resources/utilities/ich9deblob/ and will already be compiled if you ran **./oldbuild module all** or **./oldbuild module ich9deblob** -from the main directory (./), otherwise you can build it like so:\ -\$ **./oldbuild module ich9deblob**\ +from the main directory (./), otherwise you can build it like so: + + $ ./oldbuild module ich9deblob An executable file named **ich9deblob** will now appear under resources/utilities/ich9deblob/ @@ -175,8 +178,9 @@ GNU+Linux) under ./ich9deblob/. Place the factory.rom from your system (can be obtained using the external flashing guides for GM45 targets linked [../install/](../install/)) in the directory where you have your -ich9deblob executable, then run the tool:\ -\$ **./ich9deblob** +ich9deblob executable, then run the tool: + + $ ./ich9deblob A 12kiB file named **deblobbed\_descriptor.bin** will now appear. **Keep this and the factory.rom stored in a safe location!** The first 4KiB @@ -231,8 +235,9 @@ The ME interferes with flash read/write in flashrom, and the default descriptor locks some regions. The idea is that doing this will remove all of those restrictions. -Simply run (with factory.rom in the same directory):\ -\$ **./demefactory** +Simply run (with factory.rom in the same directory): + + $ ./demefactory It will generate a 4KiB descriptor file (only the descriptor, no GbE). Insert that into a factory.rom image (NOTE: do this on a copy of it. @@ -303,7 +308,8 @@ Flash chips {#flashchips} <http://pdf.datasheetarchive.com/indexerfiles/Datasheets-USER/DSAUPLD00006075.pdf> **~~- Page 20 and page 9 refer to SDA\_HDO or SDA\_HDOUT~~** only on series 6 or higher chipsets. ICH9-M (X200) does it with a strap - connected to GPIO33 pin (see IRC notes below)\ + connected to GPIO33 pin (see IRC notes below) + - According to page 29, the X200 can have any of the following flash chips: - ATMEL AT26DF321-SU 72.26321.A01 - this is a 32Mb (4MiB) chip diff --git a/docs/hcl/index.md b/docs/hcl/index.md @@ -7,6 +7,7 @@ This sections relates to known hardware compatibility in libreboot. - [Servers/workstations](#supported_workstations_x86amd) - [Laptops (ARM)](#supported_laptops_arm) - [Laptops (Intel, x86)](#supported_laptops_x86intel) + - NOTES: - [Updating the EC firmware on i945 and GM45 (recommended)](#ecupdate) @@ -436,8 +437,9 @@ Referenced below are copies (up to date at the time of writing, the macbook2,1. They are included here in case the main site goes down for whatever reason, since they include a lot of useful information. -Backups created using wget:\ -**\$ wget -m -p -E -k -K -np http://macbook.donderklumpen.de/**\ +Backups created using wget: + + $ wget -m -p -E -k -K -np http://macbook.donderklumpen.de/ **\$ wget -m -p -E -k -K -np http://macbook.donderklumpen.de/coreboot/**\ Use **-e robots=off** if using this trick for other sites and the site diff --git a/docs/hcl/kcma-d8.md b/docs/hcl/kcma-d8.md @@ -91,6 +91,7 @@ Current issues {#issues} can put a kernel in CBFS or on SATA and use that to boot GNU, which can be on a SAS drive. The linux kernel can use those SAS drives (via PIKE module) without an option ROM). + - IPMI iKVM module (optional add-on card) uses proprietary firmware. Since it's for remote out-of-band management, it's theoretically a backdoor similar to the Intel Management Engine. Fortunately, unlike diff --git a/docs/hcl/kfsn4-dre.md b/docs/hcl/kfsn4-dre.md @@ -70,6 +70,7 @@ Current issues {#issues} person says that they will look into it. [This config](http://review.coreboot.org/gitweb?p=board-status.git;a=blob;f=asus/kfsn4-dre/4.0-10101-g039edeb/2015-06-27T03:59:16Z/config.txt;h=4742905c185a93fbda8eb14322dd82c70641aef0;hb=055f5df4e000a97453dfad6c91c2d06ea22b8545) doesn't have the issue. + - Text-mode is a bit jittery (but still usable). (the jitter disappears if using KMS, once the kernel starts. The jitter will remain, if booting the kernel in text-mode). diff --git a/docs/hcl/kgpe-d16.md b/docs/hcl/kgpe-d16.md @@ -92,6 +92,7 @@ Current issues {#issues} can put a kernel in CBFS or on SATA and use that to boot GNU, which can be on a SAS drive. The linux kernel can use those SAS drives (via PIKE module) without an option ROM). + - IPMI iKVM module (optional add-on card) uses proprietary firmware. Since it's for remote out-of-band management, it's theoretically a backdoor similar to the Intel Management Engine. Fortunately, unlike diff --git a/docs/hcl/t400.md b/docs/hcl/t400.md @@ -79,6 +79,7 @@ outputs from the T400: - T400 with **Winbond W25X64** flash chip (8MiB, SOIC-16) and Lenovo BIOS 2.02 (EC firmware 1.01): - [../future/dumps/logs-t400-bios2.02-ec1.01/](../future/dumps/logs-t400-bios2.02-ec1.01/) + - Version of flashrom used for the external flashing/reading logs is the one that libreboot git revision c164960 uses. diff --git a/docs/hcl/t500.md b/docs/hcl/t500.md @@ -79,9 +79,10 @@ and The patches above are based on the output from ich9deblob on a factory.rom image dumped from the T500 with a SOIC-8 4MiB flash chip. The patch re-creates the X200 descriptor/gbe source, so the commands -were something like:\ -\$ **diff -u t500gbe x200gbe**\ -\$ **diff -u t500descriptor x200descriptor** +were something like: + $ diff -u t500gbe x200gbe + $ diff -u t500descriptor x200descriptor + ME VSCC table is in a different place and a different size on the T500. Libreboot disables and removes the ME anyway, so it doesn't matter. diff --git a/docs/hcl/x200.md b/docs/hcl/x200.md @@ -171,6 +171,7 @@ just simply remove the digitizer). - BOE-Hydis HV121WX4-120, HV121WX4-110 or HV121WX4-100 - cheap-ish, might be hard to find + - Samsung LTN121AP02-001 - common to find, cheap **If your X200 has an LED backlit panel in it, then you also need to get diff --git a/docs/index.md b/docs/index.md @@ -32,6 +32,7 @@ Installing operating systems - [List of recommended GNU+Linux distributions for libreboot](distros/) + - [How to install GNU+Linux on a libreboot system](gnulinux/) - [How to install BSD on a libreboot system](bsd/) @@ -101,20 +102,26 @@ The libreboot project has three main goals: - ***Make coreboot easy to use***. Coreboot is notoriously difficult to install, due to an overall lack of user-focussed documentation and support. Most people will simply give up before attempting to - install coreboot.\ - \ + install coreboot. + + + Libreboot attempts to bridge this divide, making sure that everything from building to installing coreboot is automated, as much as is feasibly possible. Secondly, the project produces documentation aimed at non-technical users. Thirdly, the project attempts to provide excellent user support via mailing lists and - IRC.\ - \ + IRC. + + + Libreboot already comes with a payload (GRUB), flashrom and other needed parts. Everything is fully integrated, in a way where most of the complicated steps that are otherwise required, are instead done - for the user in advance.\ - \ + for the user in advance. + + + You can download ROM images for your libreboot system and install them, without having to build anything from source. The build system is also fully automated, so building from source is easy if you @@ -167,15 +174,15 @@ press C at the GRUB console, and use this command to find out what version of libreboot you have:\ **cat (cbfsdisk)/lbversion**\ This will also work on non-release images (the version string is -automatically generated, using *git describe \--tags HEAD*), built from +automatically generated, using *git describe --tags HEAD*), built from the git repository. A file named *version* will also be included in the archives that you downloaded (if you are using release archives). If it exists, you can also extract this *lbversion* file by using the *cbfstool* utility which libreboot includes, from a ROM image that you either dumped or haven't flashed yet. In your distribution, run -cbfstool on your ROM image (*libreboot.rom*, in this example):\ -\$ **./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n lbversion -f lbversion**\ +cbfstool on your ROM image (*libreboot.rom*, in this example): + $ ./cbfstool libreboot.rom extract -n lbversion -f lbversion You will now have a file, named *lbversion*, which you can read in whatever program it is that you use for reading/writing text files. diff --git a/docs/install/bbb_setup.md b/docs/install/bbb_setup.md @@ -46,6 +46,7 @@ Shopping list (pictures of this hardware is shown later): 'Purchase'). We recommend this product because we know that it works well for our purposes and doesn't require any non-free software. + - Electrical/insulative tape: cover the entire bottom surface of the BBB (the part that rests on a surface). This is important, when placing the BBB on top of a board so that nothing shorts. Most @@ -77,7 +78,7 @@ Shopping list (pictures of this hardware is shown later): powering with the USB cable, or if you want to use [EHCI debug](../misc/bbb_ehci.html)**. - **Pin header / jumper cables** (2.54mm / 0.1" headers): you should - get male\--male, male\--female and female\--female cables in 10cm + get male--male, male--female and female--female cables in 10cm size. Just get a load of them. Other possible names for these cables/wires/leads are as follows: - flying leads @@ -97,7 +98,7 @@ Shopping list (pictures of this hardware is shown later): - **FTDI TTL cable or debug board**: used for accessing the serial console on the BBB. [This page](http://elinux.org/Beagleboard:BeagleBone_Black_Serial) - contains a list. **OPTIONAL\-\--only needed for serial console on + contains a list. **OPTIONAL\---only needed for serial console on the BBB, if not using SSH via ethernet cable.** [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -155,15 +156,15 @@ Alternatives to SSH (in case SSH fails) --------------------------------------- You can also use a serial FTDI debug board with GNU Screen, to access -the serial console.\ -\# **screen /dev/ttyUSB0 115200**\ +the serial console. + # screen /dev/ttyUSB0 115200 Here are some example photos:\ ![](images/x200/ftdi.jpg) ![](images/x200/ftdi_port.jpg)\ You can also connect the USB cable from the BBB to another computer and a new network interface will appear, with its own IP address. This is -directly accessible from SSH, or screen:\ -\# **screen /dev/ttyACM0 115200** +directly accessible from SSH, or screen: + # screen /dev/ttyACM0 115200 You can also access the uboot console, using the serial method instead of SSH. @@ -208,15 +209,17 @@ contents of this file with: Run **apt-get update** and **apt-get upgrade** then reboot the BBB, before continuing. -Check that the firmware exists:\ -\# **ls /lib/firmware/BB-SPI0-01-00A0.\***\ +Check that the firmware exists: + + # ls /lib/firmware/BB-SPI0-01-00A0.\* Output: /lib/firmware/BB-SPI0-01-00A0.dtbo -Then:\ -\# **echo BB-SPI0-01 > /sys/devices/bone\_capemgr.\*/slots**\ -\# **cat /sys/devices/bone\_capemgr.\*/slots**\ +Then: + + # echo BB-SPI0-01 > /sys/devices/bone\_capemgr.\*/slots + # cat /sys/devices/bone\_capemgr.\*/slots Output: 0: 54:PF--- @@ -227,8 +230,9 @@ Output: 5: ff:P-O-L Bone-Black-HDMI,00A0,Texas Instrument,BB-BONELT-HDMI 7: ff:P-O-L Override Board Name,00A0,Override Manuf,BB-SPI0-01 -Verify that the spidev device now exists:\ -\# **ls -al /dev/spid\***\ +Verify that the spidev device now exists: + + # ls -al /dev/spid\* Output: crw-rw---T 1 root spi 153, 0 Nov 19 21:07 /dev/spidev1.0 @@ -250,8 +254,9 @@ libreboot\_src, and put the ARM binary for it on your BBB. Finally, get the ROM image that you would like to flash and put that on your BBB. -Now test flashrom:\ -\# **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512**\ +Now test flashrom: + + # ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 Output: Calibrating delay loop... OK. diff --git a/docs/install/c201.md b/docs/install/c201.md @@ -37,6 +37,7 @@ root shell. parameters](#configuring_verified_boot_parameters) - [Removing the write protect screw](#removing_write_protect_screw) + - [Installing Libreboot to the SPI flash]() - [Installing Libreboot internally, from the device](#installing_libreboot_internally) @@ -145,21 +146,23 @@ transferred to the device. The following operations have to be executed with root privileges on the device (e.g. using the *root* account). In addition, the -**cros-flash-replace** script has to be made executable:\ -\# **chmod a+x cros-flash-replace**\ +**cros-flash-replace** script has to be made executable: + # chmod a+x cros-flash-replace -The SPI flash has to be read first:\ -\# **flashrom -p host -r flash.img**\ +The SPI flash has to be read first: + # flashrom -p host -r flash.img\ **Note: it might be a good idea to copy the produced flash.img file at this point and store it outside of the device for backup purposes.** -Then, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be executed as such:\ -\# **./cros-flash-replace flash.img coreboot ro-frid**\ +Then, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be executed as such: + + # ./cros-flash-replace flash.img coreboot ro-frid If any error is shown, it is definitely a bad idea to go further than this point. -The resulting flash image can then be flashed back:\ -\# **flashrom -p host -w flash.img**\ +The resulting flash image can then be flashed back: + + # flashrom -p host -w flash.img You should also see within the output the following:\ **"Verifying flash\... VERIFIED."** @@ -192,22 +195,26 @@ transferred to the host. The following operations have to be executed with root privileges on the host (e.g. using the *root* account). In addition, the -**cros-flash-replace** script has to be made executable:\ -\# **chmod a+x cros-flash-replace**\ +**cros-flash-replace** script has to be made executable: + + # chmod a+x cros-flash-replace -The SPI flash has to be read first (using the right spi programmer):\ -\# **flashrom -p *programmer* -r flash.img**\ +The SPI flash has to be read first (using the right spi programmer): + + # flashrom -p *programmer* -r flash.img **Note: it might be a good idea to copy the produced flash.img file at this point and store it outside of the device for backup purposes.** -Then, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be executed as such:\ -\# **./cros-flash-replace flash.img coreboot ro-frid**\ +Then, the **cros-flash-replace** script has to be executed as such: + + # ./cros-flash-replace flash.img coreboot ro-frid If any error is shown, it is definitely a bad idea to go further than this point. The resulting flash image can then be flashed back (using the right spi -programmer):\ -\# **flashrom -p *programmer* -w flash.img**\ +programmer): + + # flashrom -p *programmer* -w flash.img You should also see within the output the following:\ **"Verifying flash\... VERIFIED."** diff --git a/docs/install/d510mo.md b/docs/install/d510mo.md @@ -9,8 +9,9 @@ motherboard while they still have the original BIOS present. Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -V** +Use this to find out: + # flashrom -p internal -V + [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) diff --git a/docs/install/ga-g41m-es2l.md b/docs/install/ga-g41m-es2l.md @@ -9,8 +9,9 @@ motherboard while they still have the original BIOS present. Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -V** +Use this to find out: + # flashrom -p internal -V + [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) diff --git a/docs/install/index.md b/docs/install/index.md @@ -30,6 +30,7 @@ Setting up programmers, for external flashing via hardware method - [How to program an SPI flash chip with the BeagleBone Black](bbb_setup.html) + - [How to program an SPI flash chip with the Raspberry Pi](rpi_setup.html) @@ -251,8 +252,8 @@ ROM image, and it should work.** Flash chip size --------------- -Use this to find out:\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -V** +Use this to find out: + # flashrom -p internal -V All good? --------- @@ -271,15 +272,16 @@ appropriate executable. It is also possible for you to build these executables from the libreboot source code archives. -How to update the flash chip contents:\ -\$ **sudo ./flash update [yourrom.rom](#rom)** +How to update the flash chip contents: + $ sudo ./flash update [yourrom.rom](#rom) Ocassionally, coreboot changes the name of a given board. If flashrom complains about a board mismatch, but you are sure that you chose the -correct ROM image, then run this alternative command:\ -\$ **sudo ./flash forceupdate [yourrom.rom](#rom)** +correct ROM image, then run this alternative command: + + $ sudo ./flash forceupdate [yourrom.rom](#rom) @@ -318,8 +320,9 @@ the flashing script. do this: *rm -f patch && wget -O flash https://notabug.org/vimuser/libreboot/raw/9d850543ad90b72e0e333c98075530b31e5d23f1/flash && chmod +x flash*** -The first half of the procedure is as follows:\ -\$ **sudo ./flash i945lenovo\_firstflash [yourrom.rom](#rom).** +The first half of the procedure is as follows: + + $ sudo ./flash i945lenovo\_firstflash [yourrom.rom](#rom). @@ -342,8 +345,9 @@ and then boot; libreboot is running, but there is a 2nd procedure -When you have booted up again, you must also do this:\ -\$ **sudo ./flash i945lenovo\_secondflash [yourrom.rom](#rom)** +When you have booted up again, you must also do this: + + $ sudo ./flash i945lenovo\_secondflash [yourrom.rom](#rom) If flashing fails at this stage, try the following:\ \$ **sudo ./flashrom/i686/flashrom -p @@ -391,8 +395,9 @@ Look at the [list of ROM images](#rom) to see which image is compatible with your device. -Use this flashing script, to install libreboot:\ -\$ **sudo ./flash i945apple\_firstflash [yourrom.rom](#rom)** +Use this flashing script, to install libreboot: + + $ sudo ./flash i945apple\_firstflash [yourrom.rom](#rom) diff --git a/docs/install/kcma-d8.md b/docs/install/kcma-d8.md @@ -17,6 +17,7 @@ TODO: show photos here, and other info. - [kcma-d8 boards (and full systems) with libreboot preinstalled](#preinstall) + - [External programmer](#programmer) diff --git a/docs/install/kgpe-d16.md b/docs/install/kgpe-d16.md @@ -17,6 +17,7 @@ TODO: show photos here, and other info. - [KGPE-D16 boards (and full systems) with libreboot preinstalled](#preinstall) + - [External programmer](#programmer) diff --git a/docs/install/r400_external.md b/docs/install/r400_external.md @@ -70,8 +70,9 @@ See [\#paste](#paste). Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -V**\ +Use this to find out: + # flashrom -p internal -V + [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -228,8 +229,8 @@ source code which can be built. Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html\#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). -Test that flashrom works:\ -\# **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512**\ +Test that flashrom works: + # ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512\ In this case, the output was: flashrom v0.9.7-r1854 on Linux 3.8.13-bone47 (armv7l) @@ -252,8 +253,9 @@ factory2.rom**\ Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* have been removed.\ -Now compare the 3 images:\ -\# **sha512sum factory\*.rom**\ +Now compare the 3 images: + + # sha512sum factory\*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This is useful for reverse engineering work, if there is a desirable diff --git a/docs/install/rpi_setup.md b/docs/install/rpi_setup.md @@ -43,6 +43,7 @@ Guide](http://libreboot.org/docs/install/t60_unbrick.html). - On the X60, the BIOS chip is on the bottom of the motherboard, under a layer of protective black tape. + - On the T60, the BIOS chip is just under the palmrest, but blocked by a magnesium frame (which you will have to remove). diff --git a/docs/install/t400_external.md b/docs/install/t400_external.md @@ -75,8 +75,9 @@ See [\#paste](#paste). Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -V** +Use this to find out: + # flashrom -p internal -V + [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -234,8 +235,8 @@ source code which can be built. Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html\#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). -Test that flashrom works:\ -\# **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512**\ +Test that flashrom works: + # ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 In this case, the output was: flashrom v0.9.7-r1854 on Linux 3.8.13-bone47 (armv7l) @@ -258,8 +259,9 @@ factory2.rom**\ Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* have been removed.\ -Now compare the 3 images:\ -\# **sha512sum factory\*.rom**\ +Now compare the 3 images: + + # sha512sum factory\*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This is useful for reverse engineering work, if there is a desirable diff --git a/docs/install/t500_external.md b/docs/install/t500_external.md @@ -65,8 +65,9 @@ See [\#paste](#paste). Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -V** +Use this to find out: + # flashrom -p internal -V + [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -239,8 +240,8 @@ source code which can be built. Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html\#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). -Test that flashrom works:\ -\# **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512**\ +Test that flashrom works: + # ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 In this case, the output was: flashrom v0.9.7-r1854 on Linux 3.8.13-bone47 (armv7l) @@ -263,8 +264,9 @@ factory2.rom**\ Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* have been removed.\ -Now compare the 3 images:\ -\# **sha512sum factory\*.rom**\ +Now compare the 3 images: + + # sha512sum factory\*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This is useful for reverse engineering work, if there is a desirable diff --git a/docs/install/t60_unbrick.md b/docs/install/t60_unbrick.md @@ -17,6 +17,7 @@ Table of Contents + Brick type 1: bucts not reset. {#bucts_brick} ============================== diff --git a/docs/install/x200_external.md b/docs/install/x200_external.md @@ -33,8 +33,9 @@ Check the [suppliers](../../suppliers) page for more information. Flash chip size {#flashchips} =============== -Use this to find out:\ -\# **flashrom -p internal -V** +Use this to find out: + # flashrom -p internal -V + The X200S and X200 Tablet will use a WSON-8 flash chip, on the bottom of the motherboard (this requires removal of the motherboard). **Not all @@ -168,8 +169,8 @@ source code which can be built. Log in as root on your BBB, using the instructions in [bbb\_setup.html\#bbb\_access](bbb_setup.html#bbb_access). -Test that flashrom works:\ -\# **./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512**\ +Test that flashrom works: + # ./flashrom -p linux\_spi:dev=/dev/spidev1.0,spispeed=512 In this case, the output was: flashrom v0.9.7-r1854 on Linux 3.8.13-bone47 (armv7l) @@ -192,8 +193,9 @@ factory2.rom**\ Note: the **-c** option is not required in libreboot's patched flashrom, because the redundant flash chip definitions in *flashchips.c* have been removed.\ -Now compare the 3 images:\ -\# **sha512sum factory\*.rom**\ +Now compare the 3 images: + + # sha512sum factory\*.rom If the hashes match, then just copy one of them (the factory.rom) to a safe place (on a drive connected to another system, not the BBB). This is useful for reverse engineering work, if there is a desirable diff --git a/docs/install/x60_unbrick.md b/docs/install/x60_unbrick.md @@ -17,6 +17,7 @@ Table of Contents + Brick type 1: bucts not reset. {#bucts_brick} ============================== diff --git a/docs/install/x60tablet_unbrick.md b/docs/install/x60tablet_unbrick.md @@ -17,6 +17,7 @@ Table of Contents + Brick type 1: bucts not reset. {#bucts_brick} ============================== diff --git a/docs/misc/bbb_ehci.md b/docs/misc/bbb_ehci.md @@ -9,6 +9,7 @@ EHCI debugging 1. [Find USB port on the target that supports EHCI debug](#FindUSBportonthetargetthatsupportsEHCIdebug) + 2. [Initial setup of BBB to act as EHCI debug dongle](#InitialsetupofBBBtoactasEHCIdebugdongle) 3. [Patch BBB's `g_dbgp` module (optional, but highly @@ -236,7 +237,7 @@ Then:\ CONFIG_CONSOLE_USB=y (Console -> USB dongle console output) -Also Debugging \-\--> Output verbose XYZ ) (**FIXME** somebody verify +Also Debugging \---> Output verbose XYZ ) (**FIXME** somebody verify these): CONFIG_DEBUG_CBFS=y (Output verbose CBFS debug messages ) diff --git a/docs/misc/index.md b/docs/misc/index.md @@ -3,6 +3,7 @@ - [High Pitched Whining Noise on Idle (how to remove in Debian or Devuan)](#debian_powertop) + - [High Pitched Whining Noise on Idle (how to remove in Parabola)](#high_pitch_parabola) - [X60/T60: Serial port - how to use (for dock owners)](#serial) @@ -25,12 +26,12 @@ Start powertop automatically at boot time {#debian_powertop_autostart} ----------------------------------------- Included with libreboot is a script called 'powertop.debian'. Run this -as root and it will setup powertop to run with \--auto-tune at boot +as root and it will setup powertop to run with --auto-tune at boot time. Load the file in your text editor to see how it does that. -\$ **sudo ./resources/scripts/misc/powertop.debian** + $ sudo ./resources/scripts/misc/powertop.debian -Might want to run with \--calibrate first +Might want to run with --calibrate first If powertop doesn't work, another way (reduces battery life slightly) is to add *processor.max\_cstate=2* to the *linux* line in grub.cfg, @@ -50,18 +51,20 @@ most people can't hear or doesn't bother most people). This is not perfect! The full solution is still not discovered but this is a step towards that. Also, in some instances you will need to run -'sudo powertop \--auto-tune' again. This needs to be implemented +'sudo powertop --auto-tune' again. This needs to be implemented properly in coreboot itself! On the X60 with coreboot or libreboot, there is a high pitched sound when idle. So far we have use processor.max\_cstate=2 or idle=halt in GRUB. These consume power. Stop using them! -Be root\ -**\$ su -** +Be root + + $ su - -Installed powertop:\ -**\# pacman -S powertop** +Installed powertop: + + # pacman -S powertop and added the following to /etc/systemd/system/powertop.service : @@ -78,13 +81,14 @@ and added the following to /etc/systemd/system/powertop.service : [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target -Finally, as root do that:\ -**\# systemctl enable powertop**\ -**\# systemctl start powertop** +Finally, as root do that: + + # systemctl enable powertop + # systemctl start powertop The next time you boot the system, the buzz will be gone. -Might want to run with \--calibrate first +Might want to run with --calibrate first If powertop doesn't work, another way (reduces battery life slightly) is to add *processor.max\_cstate=2* to the *linux* line in grub.cfg, @@ -107,8 +111,9 @@ included inside the ROM. Connect your null modem cable to the serial port on the dock and connect the other end to a 2nd system using your USB Serial adapter. -On the 2nd system, you can try this (using GNU Screen):\ -**\$ sudo screen /dev/ttyUSB0 115200** +On the 2nd system, you can try this (using GNU Screen): + + $ sudo screen /dev/ttyUSB0 115200 How to quit GNU Screen: Ctrl+A then release and press K, and then press Y. @@ -227,13 +232,14 @@ battery goes to a critically low charge level, a beep occurs. Nvramtool is included in libreboot, and can be used to enable or disable this behaviour. -Disable or enable beeps when removing/adding the charger:\ -\$ **sudo ./nvramtool -w power\_management\_beeps=Enable**\ -\$ **sudo ./nvramtool -w power\_management\_beeps=Disable** +Disable or enable beeps when removing/adding the charger: + $ sudo ./nvramtool -w power\_management\_beeps=Enable + $ sudo ./nvramtool -w power\_management\_beeps=Disable + +Disable or enable beeps when battery is low: + $ sudo ./nvramtool -w low\_battery\_beep=Enable -Disable or enable beeps when battery is low:\ -\$ **sudo ./nvramtool -w low\_battery\_beep=Enable**\ -\$ **sudo ./nvramtool -w low\_battery\_beep=Disable** + $ sudo ./nvramtool -w low\_battery\_beep=Disable A reboot is required, for these changes to take effect. @@ -246,11 +252,13 @@ Get the panel name with **sudo get-edid | strings**\ Or look in **/sys/class/drm/card0-LVDS-1/edid** Alternatively you can use i2cdump. In Debian and Devuan, this is in the -package i2c-tools.\ -\$ **sudo modprobe i2c-dev**\ -\$ **sudo i2cdump -y 5 0x50** (you might have to change the value for --y)\ -\$ **sudo rmmod i2c-dev**\ +package i2c-tools. + + $ sudo modprobe i2c-dev + $ sudo i2cdump -y 5 0x50 (you might have to change the value for +-y) + + $ sudo rmmod i2c-dev You'll see the panel name in the output (from the EDID dump). If neither of these options work (or they are unavailable), physically diff --git a/docs/misc/patch.md b/docs/misc/patch.md @@ -9,12 +9,15 @@ This is just a quick guide for reference, use 'man' to know more. Apply a patch ============= -To apply a patch to a single file, do that in it's directory:\ -**\$ patch < foo.patch** +To apply a patch to a single file, do that in it's directory: + + $ patch < foo.patch + Assuming that the patch is distributed in unified format identifying the -file the patch should be applied to, the above will work. Otherwise:\ -**\$ patch foo.txt < bar.patch** +file the patch should be applied to, the above will work. Otherwise: + + $ patch foo.txt < bar.patch You can apply a patch to an entire directory, but note the "p level". What this means is that inside patch files will be the files that you @@ -22,23 +25,26 @@ intend to patch, identified by path names that might be different when the files ane located on your own computer instead of on the computer where the patch was created. 'p' level instructs the 'patch' utility to ignore parts of the path name to identify the files correctly. -Usually a p level of 1 will work, so you would use:\ -**\$ patch -p1 < baz.patch** +Usually a p level of 1 will work, so you would use: + + $ patch -p1 < baz.patch Change to the top level directory before running this. If a patch level of 1 cannot identify the files to patch, then inspect the patch file for file names. For example:\ **/home/user/do/not/panic/yet.c** -and you are working in a directory that contains panic/yet.c, use:\ -**\$ patch -p5 < baz.patch** +and you are working in a directory that contains panic/yet.c, use: + + $ patch -p5 < baz.patch You usually count one up for each path separator (forward slash) removed from the beginning of the path, until you are left with a path that exists in the current working directory. The count is the p level. -Removing a patch using the -R flag\ -**\$ patch -p5 -R < baz.patch** +Removing a patch using the -R flag + + $ patch -p5 -R < baz.patch [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -47,14 +53,17 @@ Removing a patch using the -R flag\ Create a patch with diff ======================== -Diff can create a patch for a single file:\ -**\$ diff -u original.c new.c > original.patch** +Diff can create a patch for a single file: + + $ diff -u original.c new.c > original.patch -For diff'ing a source tree:\ -**\$ cp -R original new** +For diff'ing a source tree: -Do whatever you want in new/ and then diff it:\ -**\$ diff -rupN original/ new/ > original.patch** + $ cp -R original new + +Do whatever you want in new/ and then diff it: + + $ diff -rupN original/ new/ > original.patch [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -67,14 +76,16 @@ git is something special. Note: this won't show new files created. -Just make whatever changes you want to a git clone and then:\ -**\$ git diff > patch.git** +Just make whatever changes you want to a git clone and then: + + $ git diff > patch.git -Note the git revision that you did this with:\ -**\$ git log** +Note the git revision that you did this with: -Alternatively (better yet), commit your changes and then use:\ -\$ **git format-patch -N**\ + $ git log + +Alternatively (better yet), commit your changes and then use: + $ git format-patch -N Replace N with the number of commits that you want to show. [Back to top of page.](#pagetop) @@ -87,11 +98,13 @@ git apply it really is. Now to apply that patch in the future, just git clone it again and do -with the git revision you found from above:\ -**\$ git reset \--hard REVISIONNUMBER** +with the git revision you found from above: + + $ git reset --hard REVISIONNUMBER + +Now put patch.git in the git clone directory and do: -Now put patch.git in the git clone directory and do:\ -**\$ git apply patch.git** + $ git apply patch.git If you use a patch from git format-patch, then use **git am patch.git** instead of **git apply patch.git**. git-am will re-create the commits diff --git a/docs/release.md b/docs/release.md @@ -30,6 +30,7 @@ Other bugfixes: - re-added "unset superusers" to the grub.cfg, which was needed for some users depending on the distros that they used + Libreboot 20160902 {#release20160922} ================== diff --git a/www/amd-libre.md b/www/amd-libre.md @@ -13,6 +13,7 @@ tell them that you demand libre hardware: - <https://community.amd.com/places?filterID=all%7Eobjecttype%7Espace> - <https://www.amd.com/en-us/who-we-are/contact> (has contact links for multiple countries) + - **AMD's CEO, Lisa Su, can be contacted directly via email. Tell her that you demand libre hardware: <lisa.su@amd.com>** diff --git a/www/faq.md b/www/faq.md @@ -40,6 +40,7 @@ service when you connect the ethernet cable: sudo service network-manager restart + On Parabola, you can try: sudo systemctl restart network-manager diff --git a/www/git.md b/www/git.md @@ -34,6 +34,7 @@ Not a developer? You can still help! - Work towards convincing hardware manufacturers and designers to start caring about free software. Perhaps even build your own hardware. + - Spread the word about libreboot! Tell your friends about it, and talk about it on public internet-based discussion networks (e.g. *social networks*). diff --git a/www/gpg.md b/www/gpg.md @@ -2,14 +2,15 @@ title: GPG ... - $ **gpg \--recv-keys** + $ gpg --recv-keys + The GPG key can also be downloaded with this exported dump of the pubkey: [lbkey.asc](lbkey.asc). - $ **sha512sum -c sha512sum.txt** - $ **gpg \--verify sha512sum.txt.sig** + $ sha512sum -c sha512sum.txt + $ gpg --verify sha512sum.txt.sig Old GPG key (no longer used): diff --git a/www/lists.md b/www/lists.md @@ -23,6 +23,7 @@ Backup of old Libreboot mailing lists - [User mailing list (HTML)](old/libreboot/html/lists.gnu.org/archive/html/libreboot) + - [User mailing list (mbox format)](old/libreboot/mbox/lists.gnu.org/libreboot/) - [Developer mailing list diff --git a/www/rsync.md b/www/rsync.md @@ -6,40 +6,40 @@ of these in your crontab: Libreboot project, UK (main rsync mirror) ----------------------------------------- -**rsync -avxP \--delete \--stats rsync.libreboot.org::mirrormirror +**rsync -avxP --delete --stats rsync.libreboot.org::mirrormirror /path/to/docroot/libreboot/** University of Kent, UK (backup mirror) -------------------------------------- -**rsync -avxP \--delete \--stats +**rsync -avxP --delete --stats rsync://rsync.mirrorservice.org/libreboot.org/release/ /path/to/docroot/libreboot/** Princeton university, USA (backup mirror) ----------------------------------------- -**rsync -avxP \--delete \--stats +**rsync -avxP --delete --stats rsync://mirror.math.princeton.edu/pub/libreboot/ /path/to/docroot/libreboot/** linux.ro, Romania (backup mirror) --------------------------------- -**rsync -avxP \--delete \--stats rsync://ftp.linux.ro/libreboot/ +**rsync -avxP --delete --stats rsync://ftp.linux.ro/libreboot/ /path/to/docroot/libreboot/** partyvan.eu, Sweden (backup mirror) ----------------------------------- -**rsync -avxP \--delete \--stats +**rsync -avxP --delete --stats rsync://mirror.se.partyvan.eu/pub/libreboot/ /path/to/docroot/libreboot/** mirror.si, Slovenia (backup mirror) ----------------------------------- -**rsync -avxP \--delete \--stats rsync://libreboot.mirror.si/libreboot +**rsync -avxP --delete --stats rsync://libreboot.mirror.si/libreboot /path/to/docroot/libreboot/** Are you running a mirror? Contact the libreboot project, and the link will be